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    A 15-year-old student at Manchester High School was charged with taking out a knife during a verbal altercation with another student, police said.

    On Friday, Manchester police were called to the high school around noon to investigate the incident between the two students.

    Several witnesses said one of the students in the argument was holding a knife at his side, police said.

    A student resource officer at the school did find a knife on the 15-year-old student involved. 

    The teen was charged with having a weapon on school grounds, second-degree threatening, breach of peace and carrying a dangerous weapon. 

    There were no other details immediately available. 



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

    Police and medics responded to what was being called a medical situation at Manchester High School Wednesday.Police and medics responded to what was being called a medical situation at Manchester High School Wednesday.

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    A Stamford man was charged with strangling and sexually assaulting a minor, police said. 

    On Sept. 21, Gregg Gustafson, 47 was arrested by Stratford police officers.

    An investigation into Gustafson was launched by the Stratford Police Department in February, police said. 

    The Stamford man was released on bond and is expected to appear in court on Oct. 5.



    Photo Credit: Stratford Police

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    A mother walking with her 22-month-old son in Stratford had to try fighting off two dogs attacking her toddler, police said.

    On Thursday, a Rottweiler and Pitbull approached a mother and her son walking on Quenby Place around 2:50 p.m.

    Stratford Police said the Rottweiler began attacking the toddler and when the mother intervened, both dogs starting biting her.

    One person used a shovel to stop the attacks, police said.

    The toddler has been released from Bridgeport Hospital, while the mother remains there for non-life threatening injuries. Stratford police chief Eannotti describes the wounds as bites on the woman's upper and lower torso. 

    The dogs' owner, located at Reut Drive, reported that the dogs escaped from an enclosed, fenced off area, police said. Animal Control will need to determine charges and fate of dogs, Eannottie said.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    Uber customers in Connecticut will soon notice an upgrade with upfront pricing. 

    The company said it will now provide exact pricing for Connecticut riders, which riders have been requesting for quite some time. 

    After offering exact pricing with UberPOOL and UberX, in some markets, it was a success so Uber will now bring it to Connecticut.

    “I think it would be easier. It’s such a broad range, you never know what it’s going to be,” Sabrina Milone, a student at Trinity College Hartford, said.

    “It would be nice. It has happened where you have taken a trip and there has (sic) been fees and it ends up charging you twice as much --, three times as much -- because of surge pricing and stuff like that. So I would love that,” Nick Healy, of Hartford, said.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

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    One person was pinned between a building and a car that hit them in New London on Friday night.

    Police were dispatched to Golden Street around 5:49 p.m. to investigate the report of a car hitting pedestrians.

    Responding officers said they saw one car off of the roadway between the city's information center and the stone structures located outside the building.

    A witness said two people were sitting in the area of the building when the accident happened. One person was partially pinned between the car and the building, while another laid in the flower bed, New London Police said. 

    The pedestrians and driver were transported to the Lawrence and Memorial Hospital for treatment. Their conditions are unclear. 

    Anyone who may have witnessed the accident or who may have information about the accident are asked to call the New London Department Detective Bureau at (860)447-1481, or the main number at (860)447-5269, or by texting NLPDTip + the information to Tip411(847411), or by clicking "Submit a Tip" on our Facebook page.



    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

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    WARNING: This video contains graphic language. Viewer discretion advised. 

    Unsettling footage obtained exclusively by NBC News shows the moments leading up to the fatal police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott in Charlotte, North Carolina. 

    The footage, taken by Scott's wife, does not clearly show the exact moment he was shot by police on Tuesday. Scott is seen on the ground moments after the shots were fired and surrounded by officers. 

    "He better not be f---ing dead, he better not be f---ing dead," Scott's wife Rakeyia Scott can be heard shouting at the police officers. "He better live, he better live!" 

    "He has no weapon — don't shoot him!" she is heard saying.

    Police say Scott had a handgun on him and posed "an imminent, deadly threat." The family says he was not armed and did not pose a threat to the officers.

    The killing of Scott, 43, sparked three nights of fiery protests and violent clashes between protesters and law enforcement. Activists and the Scott family have pressed city officials to release bodycam or dashcam footage of the fatal encounter, which reignited debates about race and policing nationwide.


    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

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    The life of a Rhode Island coyote who was set to be euthanized has been spared, but it is unclear if the decision will hold up, according to necn affiliate WJAR.

    Police in Middletown initially said the animal living on Aquidneck Island was a public safety concern would be shot and killed. The coyote, named Cliff, has become comfortable around people and is tracked with a GPS collar.

    Friday, Middletown Police Chief Anthony Pesare issued a release rescinding the order to have Cliff killed. Instead, police intend to capture and move him.

    Newport City Councilman John Florez, however, tells WJAR it is illegal to transport wild animals unless they are going to zoos. Police are working with Florez on a plan to move Cliff to a zoo in the area.

    As of Friday, an online petition to save Cliff's life had 34,340 signatures, approaching its goal of 35,000.



    Photo Credit: File

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    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu plans to meet with Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump in New York on Sunday, officials involved in planning the meetings told NBC News.

    Netanyahu, in town for the United Nations General Assembly, has had a tense relationship with President Barack Obama, and was accused of siding with Obama's opponent, Mitt Romney, in the 2012 presidential campaign. This time around, Netanyahu has appeared wary of appearing to take sides.

    But he has reason to press the candidates on issues critical to Israel in the final weeks of the campaign. His country has not been a major campaign subject, and neither Clinton nor Trump plan to visit Israel before Election Day.



    Photo Credit: AP

    Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu looks on during a press conference at the Foreign Ministry in Jerusalem, Thursday, Oct. 15, 2015.Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu looks on during a press conference at the Foreign Ministry in Jerusalem, Thursday, Oct. 15, 2015.

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    A wave of intense airstrikes has left nearly two million people in the Syrian city of Aleppo without water, UN officials said Saturday as activists said at least 25 more civilians had been killed.

    UN children's charity, UNICEF, said this week's renewed airstrikes — which further dashed hopes of reviving last week's cease-fire — had damaged a water pumping station which supplies about 250,000 people in rebel-held eastern parts and violence is preventing repair teams from reaching it.



    Photo Credit: Syrian Civil Defense White Helmets via AP

    In this photo provided by the Syrian Civil Defense White Helmets, men stand in rubble after airstrikes hit eastern Aleppo, Syria, Friday, Sept. 9, 2016. The Syrian Civil Defense, also known as the White Helmets, said helicopters dropped crude barrel bombs on the area.In this photo provided by the Syrian Civil Defense White Helmets, men stand in rubble after airstrikes hit eastern Aleppo, Syria, Friday, Sept. 9, 2016. The Syrian Civil Defense, also known as the White Helmets, said helicopters dropped crude barrel bombs on the area.

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    The dedication ceremony has begun in Washington, D.C. for the Smithsonian's highly anticipated National Museum of African American History and Culture, more than 100 years in the making.

    Centuries of struggles and strife, decades of planning and pain, and years of hoping for a place that African-American history can call home will culminate as President Barack Obama officially opens the museum Saturday morning.

    "It doesn't gauze up some bygone era or avoid uncomfortable truths," Obama said in his weekly radio and internet address. "Rather, it embraces the patriotic recognition that America is a constant work in progress, that each successive generation can look upon our imperfections and decide that it is within our collective power to align this nation with the high ideals of our founding." 

    With thousands of items occupying 85,000 square feet of exhibition space, the new Smithsonian will chronicle the complex relationship between the United States and a people it once enslaved, and tell the story of those who worked to make the necessary changes to bring the country to where it is today.

    The museum's dedication will begin at 10 a.m., with speeches by Obama, civil rights leader U.S. Rep. John Lewis, former President George W. Bush and former first lady Laura Bush.

    Thousands are already gathering on the National Mall to watch Obama, the nation's first black president, cut the ribbon to open the museum.

    It will open to the public at 1 p.m. following the dedication ceremony.

    "It's a historic event," said Leslie Howard, who traveled from New Orleans to attend the dedication. "And the fact that we have our first black president to dedicate it shows you how God works."

    Seeing the dedication was a family event for many; Alicia Frayer came from Charleston with her husband and three daughters to attend. "I'm inspired by history," she said. "It's a major part of our hustory, and the fact that our history and culture are here for everyone to see is so important." 

    Many celebrities are coming to the museum's dedication as well; Oprah Winfrey, who has donated more then $20 million to the museum, tweeted that she was on her way to attend the opening. The museum tweeted out video of Octavia Spencer and Janelle Monae arriving.

    D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton tweeted her personal connection to the museum's story.

    D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser spoke before the ceremony, honoring its opening and using the opportunity to call for statehood for the nation's capital, where residents do not have voting representation in Congress. "While we are proud to host this museum ... we know it will show how far Washington has to go," Bowser said.

    The museum is offering extended hours for the grand opening weekend from 1 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Saturday and 7 a.m. to midnight Sunday, but timed entry passes are no longer available. While entry is free, like at other Smithsonian facilities, the museum is instituting a timed pass system to control crowds and alleviate wait times. 

    If a visitor didn't score a ticket, they can watch the museum's dedication ceremony in large-screen viewing areas at the Washington Monument grounds, or livestream the ceremony on the museum's website.

    A free three-day festival celebrating the talent and creativity of African-American artists will also take place on the Washington Monument grounds. The Freedom Sounds festival will feature jazz, R&B, gospel and hip-hop artists. The Roots, Living Colour and Public Enemy will headline the festival Saturday, and a surprise special guest is slated to perform Sunday. 

    Anyone heading toward the museum this weekend should be prepared for large crowds and heightened security.

    For more information about the museum, check NBC 4 Washington's full coverage here.



    Photo Credit: Photography by Alan Karchmer
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    The Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture opens to the public on Saturday, Sept. 24.The Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture opens to the public on Saturday, Sept. 24.

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    The $220 million incentive deal to keep Sikorsky in Stratford does much more than just enrich an already flush-with-cash helicopter manufacturer.

    The agreement is designed to also provide a boost to the suppliers who provide components and parts for the helicopters across Connecticut.

    One of those companies is Cambridge Specialty, that makes parts specifically for the new King Stallion. Tony Ouellette has worked at Cambridge for six years, after spending eighteen years at Pratt and Whitney.

    “The aerospace industry has supported my family, put my girls through college, put my wife through grad school and its supported the way we like to live.”

    He says the news about Sikorsky provides even more security for his family, but also optimism for the next generation of workers in advanced manufacturing.

    “it gives them a sense that they’re going to have a job. They’re going to be able to be supporting their families and Sikorsky will be able to do that for them.”

    Governor Dannel Malloy toured Cambridge Specialty Friday morning. He said the Sikorsky deal is a "no brainer" because of how it benefits so many companies in Connecticut.

    The deal mandates that Sikorsky spend $11 billion on payroll and $6 billion on Connecticut suppliers. There is also a sales tax exemption on supplies purchased from Connecticut companies.

    Another benefactor of the news is seven of Connecticut's community colleges. They have programs specifically designed for workforce training at employers like Sikorsky, Pratt and Whitney, and Electric Boat.

    The program costs $7,500 for the two semester course, and financial aid packages are available for students who qualify.

    The lab at Naugatuck Valley Community College looks more like the work floor at Cambridge Specialty than at a community college, with special machines for production dotting the room.

    Scott Matta, 52, is trying to start a second career with an education at NVCC.

    “I’m hoping to get out into the work field and do 20 years,” he said during an interview Friday.

    He drove trucks in Bristol and Southington for 30 years and health issues forced him to change careers. He hopes there's something waiting for him when he graduates at a place like Pratt, which announced last week it would hire as many as 8,000 new employees to work in Connecticut over the next decade or so.

    “8,000 new jobs. I might not have been wanting to go that path but that path is there now.”

    The General Assembly is expected to vote on the Sikorsky package on Wednesday. Democrats in the House have already said they have the votes to pass it.

    Majority Leader Rep. Joe Aresimowicz, (D - Berlin), who is also a high school football coach described the status of the bill by saying, “This was a competition between Connecticut and some other states who have gotten contracts in the past and we won and being a football coach, when we go in on Wednesday we just have to push the ball over the goal line.”



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    The Quinnipiac University student pictured in a racially insensitive social media post said she doesn't condone the photo shared or its implications. 

    Quinnipiac officials have cleared 18-year-old Sarah Goodrich of any wrongdoing.

    Her roommate who posted the photo on Snapchat with the caption, “Black lives matter,” is no longer a QU student, the university announced.

    "I chose to put a charcoal Origins mask on," Goodrich said, explaining the context when her former roommate snapped the photo last Sunday night.

    At the time, the Quinnipiac freshman had no clue the photo of her would quickly spread on the internet, sparking outrage on campus and beyond.

    "I know how much of a strong a movement that is," Goodrich said of Black Lives Matter. "Seeing someone make fun of it, especially with previous things that have recently happened, I immediately knew how awful that looks. That’s why it was so important to me that I needed to clear up that is not what I condone."

    Goodrich said she was afraid for her safety this week, after the photo was shared with thousands. 

    "My parents were very scared as well, because there is the chance that somebody does recognize me in the mask and that I’m the one who put it out there. So I was very scared to walk around and be confronted,” she said. 

    After sharing with school officials she was not responsible for the offensive post, Goodrich said the university has been very sympathetic. Campus security provided her escorts before the university released a statement saying she was not at fault.

    "(QU) wanted to do everything they could to clear up what happened and kind of take all that directed hatred and tell people that’s not where it should be directed," she said.

    The roommate who took the picture chose to leave Quinnipiac on her own, Goodrich said.

    "The fact that she not only put words in my mouth, but she put them across my face, and she just felt absolutely horrible and I think that’s why she made the decision that she did," Goodrich said.

    Goodrich said she hopes others can learn from her former roommate’s poor judgment.

    "You have to be so careful what you put on (social) media," she said. "Even if you think something is a joke, there are things that are just so beyond that, you cannot just joke about."

    Several of Goodrich’s black friends from high school reached out to her this week. Goodrich assured them she was not behind the controversial Snapchat post and they encouraged her to set the record straight.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    A 7-year-old riding her bike was hit by a car in Coventry on Friday night, police said. 

    At 5:18, police responded to the scene on Nathan Hale Drive for a car versus bicycle crash. 

    The young girl was riding her bicycle when she was struck and suffered possible head and neck injuries from the impact, police said. 

    LifeStar was called to transport the girl to the hospital.

    The driver does not appear to be at fault, however, the case remains under investigation. 

    Anyone with information is asked to call (860) 742-7331


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    State police are investigating after a serious rollover accident on Interstate 84 eastbound in Manchester Saturday morning.

    Police confirmed the crash happened between exits 61 and 62. Serious injuries have been reported and the HOV lane is currently closed. 

    Police said this is a one-car crash.

    The Accident Reconstruction Team had been called in to investigate. No other information was immediately available.

    This is a developing story. Check back for updates.



    Photo Credit: Connecticut Department of Transportation

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    One person was killed and two others injured in an accident in Windham Friday night, state police said.

    Police said the car, driven by Morgan Armitage, 18, of Windham, was driving on Beacon Road near Ballamahack Road around 10:54 p.m. when the car swerved into the left shoulder and struck a tree. A passenger, identified as Carlos Yantin Jr., 20, of Willimantic, was killed in the crash.

    Armitage and a second passenger, Joshua Morales, 22, of Willimantic, were both transported to Windham Hospital with minor injuries.

    State police are investigating this crash. Further details were not available.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

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    The man famous for getting in Hillary Clinton’s face during the campaign that launched her political career has some debate advice for Donald Trump.

    Stay at his lectern.

    Rick Lazio should know. The former Republican congressman didn't — and paid the price for a performance that has become a textbook example of what not to do when your opponent is a woman.

    Lazio, today a partner with the Jones Walker law firm, ran against Clinton in 2000 for the U.S. Senate. At their first debate in Buffalo, New York, he crossed the stage to Clinton's lectern, pointing his finger as he urged her to sign a pledge about limiting the funding of their race. He was seen as hectoring, his campaign faltered and she went on to win.

    Lazio's misstep is being recalled as Clinton and Donald Trump prepare for their debate on Monday, pitting the first woman to run as a major party presidential candidate versus the former reality TV star who has made browbeating opponents a key to his success. "Little Marco," "Lyin' Ted" and "Low-energy Jeb" have given way to "Crooked Hillary," but will he fling insults at her when they meet at New York's Hofstra University? Will Clinton goad him to try to show he is not suited for the presidency?

    Trump said that he would curb his disparaging tone at the debate, to be moderated by NBC News' Lester Holt. The 90-minute debate will be televised by NBC and streamed on this site at 9 p.m. ET Monday. 

    "I'm going to be very respectful of her," he told Fox News' "Fox and Friends." "I think she deserves that and I'm going to be nice. And if she's respectful of me, that'll be nice."

    That hasn't stopped him from mocking her on Twitter.

    "Hillary is taking the day off again, she needs the rest," he tweeted Tuesday about her bout with pneumonia. "Sleep well Hillary — see you at the debate!"

    For Clinton's part, she zeroed in on Trump's derisive comments when she spoke on Steve Harvey's radio show.

    "I am going to do my very best to communicate as clearly and fearlessly as I can in the face of the insults and the attacks and the bullying and bigotry that we have seen coming from my opponent," Clinton said. "I can take it, Steve. I can take that kind of stuff. I have been at this, and I understand it is a contact sport."

    Lazio, who said that neither Trump nor Clinton had earned his support, has several suggestions for Trump: Present a positive vision, be aware of non-verbal communication and don't go for the knock-out punch, but rather, amplify Clinton's negatives. Demonstrate enough knowledge of policy details to establish his credibility as president without trying to duel with someone who has been in and around Washington for nearly 25 years. And with nearly two-thirds of the public feeling that the country is on the wrong track, distinguish himself as the change agent and Clinton as more of the failed and uninspiring status quo.

    "Have your team prepared and on high alert afterward to drive your debate message," he wrote. “There are two debates — as I well discovered — the actual event and what gets covered by the media and watched by the public afterward.

    "And finally....stay at the podium!"



    Photo Credit: Getty/NBC Universal
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Republican Donald Trump (L) and Democrat Hillary Clinton.Republican Donald Trump (L) and Democrat Hillary Clinton.

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    Connecticut reached the two million registered voter mark earlier this month.

    Friday morning, Facebook provided an unexpected increase in registration with direct pushes on personal pages across the country. With National Voter Registration Day set for next Tuesday, Connecticut's top elections official, Denise Merrill, said it was a welcomed sight.

    “It is always amazing to me how many people see these things," the Secretary of the State told NBC Connecticut in an interview. "So, even today, today is the first day that people have been seeing this Facebook feed, we’re already getting hundreds if not thousands of people registering to vote in Connecticut.”

    Another major contributor has been the recently implemented, "motor voter program" which signs people up to vote when they visit the Department of Motor Vehicles.

    There was significant criticism of the program, mainly from Republicans, during the most recent legislative session for fears that the registration of more voters would lead to even longer wait times for routine transactions.

    Merrill acknowledged the timing wasn't great to roll out a new avenue for voter sign-ups.

    "It was a miracle of bad timing. It was just at the low point for DMV with the lines and all of that.”

    However, she adds, "it wasn't a big leap," and over the summer there were seldom if any complaints that the motor-voter program was slowing down the delay-plagued agency.

    In the end, the program has led to major gains in voter registration. So far, more than 20,000 people have signed up to vote through DMV,

    “When you think that we registered 15,000 voters in one month, that’s more voters than we’ve registered from any source, ever," Merrill said.

    Next week, voter registration could increase even more, with Facebook expected to push even more users to register.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

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    Connecticut residents on the hunt for some fun in the sun Saturday, found it at Sessions Woods in Burlington, where the Connecticut’s Department of Energy and Environmental Protection held a free Hunting and Fishing day.

    The goal was to show residents what the great outdoors of Connecticut have to offer and expose children to different sports.

    Visiting the Connecticut Hunting and Fishing Day is an annual tradition for the Cable kids of Torrington. Their father Perry said he hoped his three boys would learn gun safety and a better appreciation for spending time outside.

    “I grew up in the woods, so that’s where I got to play. They don’t get to do that as much,” Perry said.

    The family also got to try a new activity called archery skeet shooting.

    “So, you shoot the bow, and they launch one of the disks and you gotta shoot it,” explained his youngest son Evan.

    “It’s just a different experience from shooting from a non-mobile target,” added oldest son Patrick.

    The siblings joined hundreds of others at Sessions Woods, where dozens of booths were set up on Saturday. Some children gathered around an empty pit to learn how to start a fire, while others learned about fire prevention and careers in forest management.

    There were several areas to practice target shooting with rifles, pistols, and bows and arrows.

    “It’s so fun to do everything that they have here,” said Travis Cable.

    “What the state’s doing is just magnificent for introducing people to things that they might not be familiar with in the state of Connecticut,” said Rick Boucher who represented the Connecticut Waterfowlers Association at booth where wetland preservation was the topic.

    One of the most popular activities were the touch tanks where kids could actually pick up bluegill and perch. The star of was a ten pound carp.

    “The hands on activities are definitely the most popular because for a lot of the youth that come they’ve never had an opportunity like this before,” said Mike Beauchene, a fisheries biologist for DEEP.

    Children fishing for fun found it at the casting competition where the winners were entered into a raffle to win a fishing pole.

    An event just like this got Christine Peyreigne of Weston interested in working with hunting birds. She hoped to get the next generation involved, showing off her red-tailed hawk during a show dedicated to birds of prey.

    “It’s definitely something that’s under spoken about because it’s such a relatively unknown sport in this region. So getting kids involved is something that’s really important,” said Peyreigne.

    The annual event draws bewteen 800 to 1,200 people every year. Organizers said they held two such events this month in honor of the 150th anniversary of the Bureau of Natural Resources.

    For more information on the event visit the DEEP website.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    The New York Times editorial board endorsed Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton Saturday, writing the endorsement is "rooted in respect for her intellect, experience, toughness and courage over a career of almost continuous public service."

    The Times touted Clinton's record as first lady, New York senator and secretary of state in their endorsement, claiming she has shown the ability to work with politicians from opposing parties to enact her policy agenda.

    "When Mrs. Clinton was sworn in as a senator from New York in 2001, Republican leaders warned their caucus not to do anything that might make her look good," the editorial says. "Yet as a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, she earned the respect of Republicans like Senator John McCain with her determination to master intricate military matters."

    The editorial also praised her foreign policy record as secretary of state, but does mention her missteps in that role.

    "As secretary of state, Mrs. Clinton was charged with repairing American credibility after eight years of the Bush administration’s unilateralism," the editorial board wrote. "She bears a share of the responsibility for the Obama administration’s foreign-policy failings, notably in Libya. But her achievements are substantial."

    Clinton's ability to bounce back from her failings, however, is another one of her strengths as a politician and presidential candidate, according to the endorsement.

    "She is one of the most tenacious politicians of her generation, whose willingness to study and correct course is rare in an age of unyielding partisanship. As first lady, she rebounded from professional setbacks and personal trials with astounding resilience," the editorial board wrote.

    The endorsement only made passing reference to Republican nominee Donald Trump, who "discloses nothing concrete about himself or his plans while promising the moon and offering the stars on layaway," according to the Times.

    The editorial board added it will publish another editorial to explain why Trump is the "worst nominee put forward by a major party in modern American history."



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    PITTSBURGH, PA - JULY 30: Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton looks on during a campaign rally with democratic vice presidential nominee U.S. Sen Tim Kaine (D-VA) at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center on July 30, 2016 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine are continuing their three-day bus tour through Pennsylvania and Ohio. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)PITTSBURGH, PA - JULY 30: Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton looks on during a campaign rally with democratic vice presidential nominee U.S. Sen Tim Kaine (D-VA) at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center on July 30, 2016 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine are continuing their three-day bus tour through Pennsylvania and Ohio. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

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    Groton police are looking to identify a shoplifting suspect.

    Groton Town police said that around 3:15 p.m. Saturday a female suspect was involved in a shoplifting incident at Walmart.

    Anyone with information or who recognizes the suspect in the picture above is asked to contact Officer Mike McCarthy at (860) 441-6712.



    Photo Credit: Groton Police Department

    According to Groton police, the suspect pictured above was involved in a shoplifting incident at Walmart Saturday afternoon.According to Groton police, the suspect pictured above was involved in a shoplifting incident at Walmart Saturday afternoon.

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