Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

News Top Stories

older | 1 | .... | 1605 | 1606 | (Page 1607) | 1608 | 1609 | .... | 2521 | newer

    0 0


    Wallingford police have arrested a man accused of breaking into unlocked cars in a parking lot Tuesday night.

    Police said William Flores, 26, of Wallingford, was arrested after responding to a report of a man trying to enter parked cars in the parking lot of Gaetano’s Restaurant on North Main Street.

    Several witnesses reporting seeing a man, identified as Flores, pulling on door handles at different vehicles in the lot. One witness reported seeing Flores open the door of an unlocked Nissan Pathfinder and rummage through it.

    Officers said when they found Flores they found items that matched those reported missing by the Pathfinder’s owner.

    Flores was charged with third-degree burglary and sixth-degree larceny. He was held on a $10,000 bond and is scheduled to appear in court on Nov. 22.

    Wallingford police remind residents to lock their cars and secure their valuables.



    Photo Credit: Wallingford Police Department

    0 0


    A yearslong standoff between two different approaches in the American economy could finally be at an end with Donald Trump's election, according to a CNBC analysis.

    The Federal Reserve's monetary policy has been to keep interest rates near zero to pump up the economy, but growth has been tepid.

    The government's fiscal policy is its approach to the tax code and government spending. President Barack Obama's first term started with a stimulus package but Congress hasn't been able to get Congress to pass much more since then.

    Now that Republicans will control the White House and both houses of Congress, that standoff could be over, and that means he could be a massive force for good for the U.S. economy.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Republican president-elect Donald Trump gives a thumbs up to the crowd during his acceptance speech at his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of Wednesday, November 9, 2016. Donald Trump defeated Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to become the 45th president of the United States. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)Republican president-elect Donald Trump gives a thumbs up to the crowd during his acceptance speech at his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of Wednesday, November 9, 2016. Donald Trump defeated Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton to become the 45th president of the United States. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

    0 0


    One man is in critical condition after a crash and stabbing in Norwich on Tuesday night and another has been arrested.

    Police responded to the area of 45 Union St. just after 10:30 p.m. to investigate a crash with injuries and learned that four men had been in the car, there was some sort of altercation and two fled the scene.

    The driver was found nearby on Broadway and he had been stabbed twice in the chest, police said.

    Officers gave him first aid, then requested an ambulance and 40-year-old Kristopher Goodrow, of Niantic, was transported to William W. Backus Hospital, then flown to Hartford Hospital because his injuries are life-threatening, police said.

    Around 8:30 a.m. Wednesday, police arrested 51-year-old Cedric Edwards, of Norwich, who is suspected in the stabbing and altercation.

    He was charged with first-degree assault, first-degree robbery, third-degree assault, sixth-degree larceny and first-degree reckless endangerment.

    Edwards is being held on a $250,000 and will be arraigned tomorrow.

    Police said they are still investigating and anyone with information should call Detective Anthony Gomes at 860-886-5561 extension 3155, e-mail agomes@cityofnorwich.org or call the Norwich Police Department Anonymous Tip Line at 860.886.5561 extension 4.



    Photo Credit: Norwich Police

    0 0


    Even though they were swept by Democrats at the top of the ticket in Connecticut, down the ballot, the Connecticut GOP made sweeping gains in State House and Senate races.

    The Democrats’ House majority was trimmed from an 87-64 majority, to a far less impressive projected 79-72 margin, according to current election results.

    The major story of the evening was the swing of control in the State Senate.

    A pair of Democratic incumbents lost, while an open seat previously held by a Democrat was captured by the GOP.

    In the district that includes Ansonia, Derby, and Hamden, Republican challenger George Logan appeared to narrowly defeat longtime Democratic incumbent Senator Joe Crisco who has held the seat since the early 1990’s.

    In Meriden, former State Senator Len Suzio recaptured a seat he held several years ago in a rematch of a race he lost narrowly two years ago. Sen. Dante Bartolomeo held a last minute campaign appearance with US Sen. Chris Murphy, but the notoriety wasn’t enough to put her over the top.

    Finally, in the 18th Senate district that includes Groton, Stonington, and Waterford, Republicans won a seat that had previously held by Sen. Andrew Maynard, a Democrat, who announced his retirement earlier this year. Heather Somers, who gained name recognition as the Republican nominee for Lieutenant Governor in 2014, defeated former State Representative Timothy Bowles.

    Since none of the election results are final and some votes appear to not have even been counted yet according to the Secretary of the State’s website, the 18-18 tie is a projection. Both Democrats and Republicans late Tuesday night communicated to NBC Connecticut that they did not expect the number on either side to change.

    With the 18-18 split, there will be more pressure than ever on Lieutenant Governor Nancy Wyman, who presides over the State Senate.

    Since the executive branch is controlled by Democrats, they will maintain control of the State Senate because of the tie-breaking procedure, which is in the hands of the Lieutenant Governor.

    Wyman, a Democrat, is widely respected by both sides of the aisle, and will act as the tie-breaking vote.

    Republicans were one seat short of obtaining their first majority in the State Senate in 20 years.



    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

    0 0


    A car crashed into glass doors at Norwalk Community College on Tuesday. 

    The 56-year-old driver told police he was picking up his sister-in-law from the school at 9:24 p.m.

    He said he parked his 2003 green Subaru Legacy outside the entrance to the East Campus building, police said. 

    Instead of putting his foot on the brake, the driver stepped on the accelerator, which caused his car to drive over the curb and onto the sidewalk, according to police. 

    The car eventually struck the glass doors of the building and stopped, causing heavy damage to the doorway.

    The driver was transported to Norwalk Hospital for minor back pain. He was issued an infraction ticket. 


    0 0


    President-elect Donald Trump vowed on the campaign trail to get rid of the Affordable Care Act, but state officials in Connecticut said Wednesday that the state's health care exchange will continue to be “a vital link” for the 800,000 residents who get health insurance through it. 

    “I want to reassure Connecticut consumers that Access Health CT will continue to be a vital link, connecting them to high-quality, affordable health insurance. In Connecticut, we’ve seen more than 800,000 residents use the state healthcare exchange to find coverage,” Lt. Gov. Nancy Wyman, chair of the Board of Access Health CT, said in a statement. 

    Republicans, who swept both the U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S. Senate, have already suggested they will eliminate or overhaul the Affordable Care Act and and Trump has vowed to “repeal and replace” it. 

    “During this open enrollment period, just as we’ve done before, Access Health CT stands ready to assist consumers in finding and enrolling in the healthcare plan that best meets their needs. Our leadership on healthcare is well-established,” Wyman said in a statement. “If there are any changes in the federal ACA, we will address them—and, as always, the priority will continue to be ensuring affordable, accessible, high-quality healthcare for our residents.” 

    Gov. Dannel Malloy said residents should enter into their health contracts now and any changes to the law would take time, even with Republicans in control of the White House and Congress.

    "No one should miss the opportunity to have coverage or to continue to have coverage because of this change in election," he said.

    Open enrollment ends Jan. 31.



    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

    0 0


    Two military jets based out of Marine Corps Air Station Miramar collided Wednesday over the Pacific Ocean off the coast of San Diego, California.

    One pilot was found in the ocean while the other landed safely at Naval Air Station North Island.

    The F/A-18 Hornets were participating in a training mission just before noon when the mid-air collision occurred, military officials told NBC 7. One pilot ejected over the water at the time of the collision.

    A distress call was received at 12:11 p.m. and the pilot was recovered by at 12:41 p.m. by crew members of USS Carl Vinson.

    Both pilots are being treated and were described as in stable condition by military officials.

    The single-seat jets are part of Third Marine Aircraft Wing.

    The cause of the crash is currently under investigation, military officials said.

    No other information was immediately available.

    NBC 7 Newschopper launched and headed to MCAS Miramar north of San Diego, where the jets were based.



    Photo Credit: Lance Cpl. Eryn Edelman / Dept. of Defense, file

    In this Oct. 4, 2014, file photo, a U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18 Hornet flies during the Marine Air Ground Task Force demonstration at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, San Diego, California.In this Oct. 4, 2014, file photo, a U.S. Marine Corps F/A-18 Hornet flies during the Marine Air Ground Task Force demonstration at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, San Diego, California.

    0 0


    It’s about to become a lot harder to get around on the east side of midtown Manhattan.

    That’s because the NYPD and Secret Service are placing extra security measures around Trump Tower, the East 56th Street skyscraper where President-elect Donald Trump lives. The tower will also likely become the Republican’s base of operations as he prepares to transition to the White House on Jan. 20.

    An NYPD representative told NBC News that the department is “assisting the Secret Service with security measures for the President-elect.” Trump’s personal security will be handled by the Secret Service, which has provided him and several members of his family with security details for several months.

    The NYPD is likely to use its manpower to help with crowd control at the skyscraper as supporters, protesters and media gather outside the building in the coming months.

    As of Wednesday, foot traffic by the building was being regulated by NYPD officers posted at Fifth Avenue and East 56th Street. Protesters, supporters and members of the media have been corralled into pens around the building, and security screens have been set up at the side entrances of the building to obscure the identities of people entering and leaving the office building.

    The Federal Aviation Administration has also released temporary flight restrictions over midtown Manhattan along with parts of western Queens and Brooklyn until Jan. 21, the day after Trump’s inauguration. Helicopters and planes cannot enter the restricted area unless they are arriving at or departing from heliports in Manhattan or are law enforcement or emergency aircraft.

    It won’t be the first time that the NYPD and Secret Service have worked together, either. The two agencies coordinated security for Pope Francis’ 2015 visit, election night parties for Trump and Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton, and the yearly United Nations General Assembly.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images, File

    Trump Tower on 5th Avenue in Manhattan this March. The man who gave the tower its name has been elected the 45th president of the United States, requiring greater security for the skyscraper.Trump Tower on 5th Avenue in Manhattan this March. The man who gave the tower its name has been elected the 45th president of the United States, requiring greater security for the skyscraper.

    0 0


    The day after Donald Trump's victory, the head of the nation's largest Muslim civil rights and advocacy organization asked the president-elect to respect the rights of all Americans.

    At the same time, the Council on American-Islamic Relations will work with Trump and his administration as a way to strengthen the nation, CAIR National Executive Director Nihad Awad pledged in a statement.

    And Awad tried to calm those who may be concerned about the future for Muslims in America. At one point, Trump campaigned on a promise to ban Muslims who don't live in the U.S. from entering as a way to keep out terrorists, and in November 2015, Trump proposed Muslims be required to register in a national database.

    "To those in the American Muslim community who are fearful of the future, know that America is your home and you have the same rights and responsibilities as all other Americans,” Awad said.

    Last fall, hundreds of demonstrators gathered in San Diego to condemn discrimination against refugees and Islamophobic attitudes.

    Trump has said he would suspend arrivals from Syria, portraying them as a potential security threat. Of the approximately 12,000 Syrian refugees admitted into the U.S. in 2016, the vast majority identify as Muslims.

    San Diego, the nation's eighth-largest city, has received 626 Syrian refugees since Oct. 1, more than any other in the United States.

    On Wednesday, CAIR called on people of all faith, racial and political backgrounds to commit to working with each other.

    "Regardless of who won or lost yesterday's election, American Muslims are here to stay. We are not going anywhere, and will not be intimidated or marginalized,” Awad said in the written statement.



    Photo Credit: AP, File

    A file photo of Nihad Awad, the National Executive Director of the Council of American-Islamic Relations.A file photo of Nihad Awad, the National Executive Director of the Council of American-Islamic Relations.

    0 0


    For the first time, an openly LGBT person has been elected as governor of a U.S. state: Kate Brown, a Democrat whom NBC News projected to win over Bud Pierce.

    It was some of the brightest news to come out an Election Day that saw Donald Trump elected president and many in America's lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer community, NBC OUT reported.

    Brown's win was "one for the history books," said Aisha Moodie-Mills, executive director of the Gay & Lesbian Victory Fund, in a statement.

    And there was more good news for the community out of the vote, including more than 150 openly LGBTQ candidates running for office and the possible defeat of a Republican governor who gained national notoriety for ushering in anti-LGBTQ legislation.



    Photo Credit: AP

    Oregon Gov, Kate Brown speaks to the crowd of supporters after being elected at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland, Ore., on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. (AP Photo/Steve Dykes)Oregon Gov, Kate Brown speaks to the crowd of supporters after being elected at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland, Ore., on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016. (AP Photo/Steve Dykes)

    0 0


    Republicans who opposed Donald Trump found themselves in an odd position on Wednesday, as reality sunk in that the Republican nominee they warned would lead the party to ruin instead led them into the White House with a Republican Congress.

    With the sudden prospect of a historic governing majority in front of them, a number of Trump critics took a new look at the candidate they had criticized as unqualified or offensive, NBC News reported.

    "This needs to be a time of redemption, not a time of recrimination," House Speaker Paul Ryan said at a news conference.

    Old foes wished him well: Jeb Bush, who called Trump the "chaos candidate" in the primaries and refused to vote for him, offered congratulations and prayers. The National Review's editors, who devoted an issue to opposing his candidacy under any circumstances, congratulated him too and urged Congress to "do what they can to reinforce Trump's better instincts."



    Photo Credit: AP

    Republican presidential candidate, Donald Trump concludes a plane-side rally in a hanger at Pittsburgh International Airport in Imperial, Pa., Sunday, Nov. 6, 2016.Republican presidential candidate, Donald Trump concludes a plane-side rally in a hanger at Pittsburgh International Airport in Imperial, Pa., Sunday, Nov. 6, 2016.

    0 0


    This election could have a major impact on businesses in Connecticut.

    Some owners are optimistic while others have concerns following republican wins statewide and nationally.

    At Northeast Express Transportation in Windsor Locks, owner Kevin Maloney oversees a staff of 80 handling delivery and distribution.

    He says recently it’s been tough for this longtime family-run company.

    “The business community, in particular the small business community, has suffered under the Obama administration,” Maloney, said.

    Maloney and others have high hopes that a Donald Trump presidency would spur job growth.

    That includes through the president-elect’s promises to repeal Obamacare, cut regulations, and lower taxes on corporations.

    The National Federation of Independent Business said healthcare costs are a burden.

    “For more business owners here in Connecticut it’s been a very negative effect. Premiums have gone up, deductibles have gone up,” Andy Markowski, NFIB’s state director, said.

    At the Connecticut Business & Industry Association in Hartford, leaders are cautious after Trump’s surprising win.

    “One of the things Donald Trump talks a lot about is get our economy booming again. There’s things he can do but he’s not very specific on how that’s going to happen,” Joe Brennan, CBIA’s president & CEO, said.

    Brennan says businesses in his group believe making the country more competitive is a good thing.

    But some companies have concerns especially when it comes to changes to immigration and trade deals which have benefited Connecticut.

    “We’re one of the leading states when it comes to international trade. A big part of our economy is companies that sell their products and services overseas,” Brennan, said.

    The CBIA also believes people in the state sent a message in state races that they are concerned about economy.

    The organization thinks voters picked winners, not solely based on political party, but also who would be best for growth and job creation.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

    0 0


    After staying up late to track the 2016 presidential election results, University of New Haven sophomore Khaaliq Crowder said it was a struggle to fall asleep.

    “When I saw a Buzzfeed news article saying (Donald) Trump is president I just, I was in such denial and this cannot be,” he said.

    Crowder has found one way to cope with the stress of his preferred choice for president, Hillary Clinton, not winning.

    “Trying to listen to music to numb, it’s very therapeutic for me,” Crowder said.

    At the UNH Student Center for Diversity and Inclusion, Director Juan Hernandez said the message to those who are shocked is to take the results as a call to action to become more politically involved.

    “Run for office, locally, statewide,” Hernandez said, “because right now you’re seeing that I think something the Republicans have done an amazing job at is actually taking of general assemblies.”

    UNH sophomore Zachary Glowacki is not stressing out the day following the election as he proudly wore his red “Make America Great Again” hat on campus.

    “Everybody thinks he’s going to cause a World War because he’s a hot head but I don’t believe he will, I believe he will act like a president like everything other president would and do the right things to make this country better, which is why his quote is Make American Great Again.”

    Crowder is still reluctant to give Trump a chance as he worries what his presidency will mean for his future.

    “We’re just going to have to give him a try, and um, I really don’t know to be honest,” he said, “but this one line from Kendrick Lamar’s song, “We’re gonna be alright.”

    One suggestion if you remained stressed out by the election results is try taking break from reading Facebook feeds and Twitter wars, at least for a little.


    0 0


    New Haven police are investigating shootings that happened on Wednesday night and left two people in the hospital.

    At 7:30 p.m., Yale-New Haven Hospital staff memebers informed police about two gunshot victims that were brought to the emergency room in private cars, police said. 

    Brian Faulks, 28, of New Haven, was shot several times and remains in serious but stable condition. 

    Erin K. Jones, 38, also of New Haven, was shot and is in critical condition at the hospital.

    Detectives believe the shootings happened on Franklin Street at the Farnam Courts Housing Complex.

    Detectives are interested in speaking with anyone who witnessed the shootings or who may have information valuable to the case: (203) 946-6304. Calls may be made anonymously.


    0 0


    After months at sea, sailors aboard the USS New Hampshire are back home in the arms of their loved ones Wednesday.

    It was a moment Sarah Eastwood was waiting for. But she didn't expect her boyfriend of five years, Petty Officer 2nd Class Benjamin Gaston, to get down on one knee and propose when he walked off the ship.

    "I said yes of course," said Eastwood, shaking and choking back tears.

    Moments before Gaston arrived, Eastwood said the couple is "really excited to just start our new lives," adding Gaston's contract with the Navy ends in February.

    It was a sweet homecoming for dozens of families and friends.

    "Dad! I want to tell you something," were the first words out of 4-year-old Carter Wolff's mouth. He and his 7-year-old brother, Blake, got to give the first hug to their father, Chief Petty Officer Brett Wolff. The two, sprinting over and jumping into Wolff's arms.

    The first kiss was shared by Haley Price and Petty Officer 3rd Class Johnathan Price. The two got married just before the ship deployed.

    "We're all kind of used to this feeling. It's just part of life," said Shawn Smith, waiting to greet his brother Clayton, who was on the USS New Hampshire.

    The Smiths are a military family. Smith and his twin brother, Shane, serve the Navy. Their brother Christopher is deployed with the Air Force. Their father, Ronald, is retired Army.

    "I am absolutely proud of him," said Ronald Smith of his son, Clayton.

    "Interesting times over sea, but it's nice to be back home where everything is familiar," Clayton Smith said of his experience aboard the USS New Hampshire. "All the light sockets play the stuff that I want to plug-in..."

    The Virginia-class, fast-attack submarine travels about 46,000 standard miles. That's equal to about 1.84 trips around the world at the equator.

    The submarine made stops at ports in Norway, Scotland, and France.

    Thirty-three sailors and four officers earned their Submarine Warfare Qualification, seven officers were promoted to the next rank, 12 re-enlisted during deployment.

    The USS New Hampshire was commissioned on Oct. 25, 2008. It's the third Navy ship to be named after the state of New Hampshire.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

    0 0


    Residents of the Thames River Apartments will soon have to find a new place to live.

    The New London Housing Authority Board of Commissioners voted 4-1 Tuesday to pass a resolution to file an application for disposition and disposal of the Crystal Avenue high-rises, according to Board Chairwoman Betsy Gibson.

    That means tenants will eventually receive HUD vouchers to relocate to wherever they want to live, and eventually the apartment complex will be demolished, Gibson said.

    The families will be first on the list when new housing is built, she added.

    The 124-unit complex has been plagued by mice, rodents, crumbling walls and unsanitary living conditions.

    Gibson said she plans to set up a meeting next week with the residents and city to talk about plans and answer questions about how the board plans to move forward.

    The New London Housing Authority will have to incur the relocation costs of tenants, Gibson said.

    The process could take six months to a year.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

    0 0


    Donald Trump's presidential election stirred anti-union sentiments in California, NBC News reported.

    YesCalifornia, which is pushing for California to secede and become a separate country, staged a daylong "informational session" Wednesday outside the State Capitol in Sacramento.

    The organization, a political action committee formed in August 2015, is working for a referendum on the 2019 state ballot that would start the long path to legal secession.



    Photo Credit: AP

    Protesters march in opposition of Donald Trump's presidential election victory in San Francisco, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016.Protesters march in opposition of Donald Trump's presidential election victory in San Francisco, Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016.

    0 0


    A man accused of hitting and killing a mother and injuring her 7-year-old daughter in Meriden in October, then fleeing from the scene, has turned himself in to police.

    Alex Checa, 21, of Meriden, turned himself in to Meriden police on Wednesday on an active warrant for his arrest.

    Checa has been arrested in connection with the hit-and-run just after 8:30 p.m. on Oct. 7 at the intersection of Springdale and Lewis avenues that killed 40-year-old Dania Cedeno-Delrosario, of Meriden, and injured her daughter.

    Officers who responded to the scene found Cedeno-Delrosario suffering from life-threatening injuries. She died at Hartford Hospital at 10:49 p.m. and police records say she suffered a traumatic brain injury.

    Police said Cedeno-Delrosario and her 7-year-old daughter, Denisse, were trying to cross Springdale Avenue when they were hit and the mother pushed her daughter out of the way a split second before the car hit them.

    One piece of evidence police found at the scene was a side mirror from the vehicle and investigators determined it belonged to a 2005 Nissan Altima, but it did not lead them directly to the car because hundreds of similar models are registered in the state.  

    A month into the investigation, police said a tip from an anonymous NBC Connecticut viewer led them to Checa, who finally turned himself in to authorities.

    Checa's family lives in Meriden and told NBC Connecticut that they were heartbroken about the case and were shocked to learn that Checa might be involved.

    Court records state the car Checa was driving belongs to his girlfriend. The vehicle is in Patterson, New Jersey and due to be will be transported to Meriden on Thursday. 

    When Checa went to police, he told them he had noticed a scrap metal truck drive by him on Lewis Avenue that night, then a woman's head hit his windshield, according to the arrest report. However, he told his friend that someone hit his car and left.

    Checa went on to tell police that he did not come forward because he was scared and did not know what to do and admitted to replacing the side mirror and having the windshield replaced, according to police.

    Checa, whose license was suspended in May 2014, has been charged with evading responsibility, causing the death of a person, tampering with or fabricating physical evidence and operating a motor vehicle with a suspended license.

    He is due back in court on Dec. 15.



    Photo Credit: Connecticut State Police

    0 0


    The State Department has issued an unusually severe warning to Americans considering traveling to North Korea, saying tourists to the authoritarian country may well be propping up its dangerous nuclear program, NBC News reported.

    "The [Democratic People's Republic of Korea] funnels revenue from a variety of sources to its nuclear and weapons programs, which it prioritizes above everything else, often at the expense of the well-being of its own people," according to the message dated Wednesday.

    "It is entirely possible that money spent by tourists in the DPRK goes to fund these programs. We would urge all travelers, before travelling to the DPRK, to consider what they might be supporting," it added.

    The State Department also warned that travelers to the Kim Jong Un-ruled country face "serious risk of arrest and long-term detention" for actions that would not be considered crimes in the U.S.



    Photo Credit: AP

    In this May 10, 2016, file photo, North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un watches a parade from a balcony at the Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang. The U.S. State Department issued a warning to anyone wishing to travel there that they may be inadvertently funding the country's nuclear program.In this May 10, 2016, file photo, North Korea's leader Kim Jong Un watches a parade from a balcony at the Kim Il Sung Square in Pyongyang. The U.S. State Department issued a warning to anyone wishing to travel there that they may be inadvertently funding the country's nuclear program.

    0 0


    Voters in Massachusetts approved the measure to legalize recreational use of marijuana, which is causing Gov. Dannel Malloy to take a closer look at Connecticut regulations. 

    "As our shared border will attest, we’ll have to look at those presumption," Malloy said the day after the election. "Our biggest border is with Massachusetts."

    On Nov. 8, Massachusetts became the first state in the east to legalize marijuana, an anticipated vote that Malloy said was not a surprise. Malloy notes that while he's always been an opponent to recreational marijuana use, he is willing to "re-examine" his views following Massachusetts' decision. 

    "I’ve never been an advocate of that on the other hand, of course, when multiple states move in a direction you have to re-exam your own personal thoughts on the issue," Malloy said.

    While the drug is illegal under federal law, the people in the Commonwealth joined others Tuesday in California and Nevada to legalize the drug. Prior to the election, four western states already allow recreational use of the drug.

    On Tuesday, people in Connecticut watched election results from across the state line this year.

    “Tax it the same way and that will bring in more revenue to fix the roads and fix the infrastructure of Connecticut,” John Kaminsky of Cromwell, said.

    In Connecticut this year, regulators and legislators expanded the state’s medical marijuana program.

    Some residents are against any expansion.

    “If they have to do it at home medically that’s fine,” Beth Burke of Windsor, said.

    Retail sales in Massachusetts would likely begin in 2018.

    Though in about a month the state would decriminalize small amounts and allow people to grow marijuana at home.


older | 1 | .... | 1605 | 1606 | (Page 1607) | 1608 | 1609 | .... | 2521 | newer