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    Some of the biggest names in the Connecticut business world saw significant gains on Wall Street in the past 24 hours.

    They included the Farmington-based United Technologies Corporation, the New Britain-based Stanley Black and Decker, and Lockheed Martin, the corporate parent of Stratford-based Sikorsky.

    Economic observers say there is a direct effect from the presidential election.

    "After Trump's speech there was a second chance to take a deep breath and take a look that it may not be as chaotic as we thought it would be."

    In the hours leading up to the election there was an international sell-off that led to a halt in Dow futures trading, heightening uncertainty.

    In the two days since, there has been more optimism, which Stanley Black and Decker has benefited from, Cadden said.

    Because of Trump's discussion about infrastructure improvements, Cadden said, "it’s not surprising that the construction stocks would see a significant increase."

    Smaller employers in Connecticut are excited for a different reason, the new Republican influence in the Connecticut State Senate.

    The 18-18 split with Democrats holding the tie-breaking vote by virtue of Lieutenant Governor Nancy Wyman is the first such divide since 1893.

    Connecticut business owners say such balance means more certainty on budget and tax matters.

    "We're going to hold their feet to the fire," said Douglas Johnson, the President of Marion Manufacturing in Cheshire.

    He says he hopes the Republican influence leads to less talk about tax hikes and more discussion about tax rebates and incentives.

    Johnson said, "We can see what happens into the early parts of the session and if these changes come true that we think we’re going to see, absolutely, people are going to be able to release some of that pent up money and the improvements that we need to do internally."


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    Kidde is recalling 3.6 million smoke alarms in the United States, and another 1.5 mllion in Canada, the company and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission said on Thursday.

    The recall involves the Kidde NightHawk talking combo smoke/carbon monoxide alarm with model number KN-COSM-IB and manufacture dates between June 1, 2004 and Dec. 31, 2010. 

    The alarm can fail to continue to chirp when it reaches its seven year end-of-life, even if the batteries are replaced, leading consumers to believe it is still working. Kidde has received eight reports of incidents with the recalled alarms; no injuries have been reported.

    Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled alarms and contact Kidde   for a free replacement alarm. 

    Consumer Contact: Kidde toll-free at 855-239-0490 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday or online at www.kidde.com and click on "Product Safety Notice" for more information.


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    Electric Boat (EB) employees build state-of-the-art submarines for the Navy, and many served themselves.

    On the eve of Veterans Day, the company saluted those veterans who made the sacrifice to protect Americans' freedom.

    There were multiple services throughout the day to make sure all shifts at the shipyard were able to attend. Employees have holiday off.

    The SubTones, EB's chorus, sang the National Anthem and the Navy Hymn.

    Engineer Darrell Comena gave the invocation. And there were remarks from EB Veterans Network Lead Anthony Paolino, MDA-UAW Financial Secretary Bill May, and Supervisor of Shipbuilding Capt. Jeffrey Heydon.

    The first Veterans Day observance at EB was in 1999. It's been a tradition since.

    Staff also made sure to tout their new initiatives to mentor and hire more veterans.

    "Keep this country safe for those who are going to be here after I leave the earth, and my kids, and everything," said EB employee Angel Rosa, retired U.S. Air Force. "It was a great honor to do that."

    Rosa served the Air Force for 23 years as a mid-air refueling specialist.

    "I am the son of two veterans of World War II. My father was Army Air Corps, my mother was Navy," said veteran and EB employee David Gallup, choking back tears.

    Gallup said the military is in his blood.

    "I didn't know it at the time. I didn't know what it would mean until I got older and life and the importance of the service," he said.

    In a way, these veterans are still serving by helping to build the Navy's fast-attack submarines that keep Americans safe.

    "I'm proud to serve, and I'm sure (those in the military) are proud to serve and keep this nation free and safe," Rosa said.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    Amid classic IRS scams, the agency always maintained that it would never call a person on the phone about taxes they may owe, which has caused people to lose a lot of money. 

    Now that the IRS has hired debt collectors to call people on their behalf, how will you know if it’s scam call or the real deal?

    The IRS listed the companies they hired: CBE Group, Conserve, Performant, and Pioneer.

    These companies will collect on accounts where tax payers owe money, but the IRS is no longer actively pursuing it. 

    "That will be very confusing," said Rashida Akhand of Marlborough. "Which one is it?"

    Akhand has been called several times by people claiming to be the IRS, but she never fell for the scam because she followed one simple rule.

    "IRS don’t call you," said Akhand, "(The) IRS sends you a letter."

    Written verification is one of the ways you will be able to spot the fake callers. The IRS said a person will get two separate letters to notify them about being transferred to a private collection agency before the calls start coming.

    Officals also said the approved collection companies will never demand payment by a pre-paid money card or wire transfer.

    Lois Greisman of the Federal Trade Commission said that should be a red flag.

    "No one in the government is ever going to ask for payment by wire transfer or a gift card such as iTunes," said Greisman.

    While that is important to know, what is not known is how the scam IRS callers will fare in a market of real ones.

    "That’s a great question," said Greisman. "There is really no way to know. We are seeing an increase of these kinds of scams over the last year and unfortunately, that trend appears to be continuing."

    The Treasury Inspector General said during a two year period, they got more than 730,000 complaints about fakers claiming to be calling to collect for the IRS. Nearly 4,500 people were victims during that time and lost some 23 million dollars.

    "They are menacing and they are ruthless in their pursuit of their victims," said Bruce Foucart of Homeland Security. "They convey authority and sense of urgency that leaves their victims terrified."

    Some people have taken to YouTube to warn others when they were contacted by scammers. They recorded themselves talking to the scammer who threatened jail for those who didn’t pay right away. The videos collectively have over 1 million views. But even with people spreading the word, some are still getting taken advantage of by this scam. With the added confusion of legitimate IRS debt collectors contacting people, it could get worse.

    The IRS declined our request for an interview, but in a press release said the collection agencies will start next spring.

    Remember, if you get a call from someone claiming to be the IRS or collecting for the IRS and you are not sure if it's real, you can always hang up and contact the IRS to verify that its' legitimate.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

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    As demonstrations against President-elect Donald Trump take place across the country, a New Haven-based activist group organized a protest for Thursday afternoon.

    The New Haven Workers Association – Unidad Latina en Accion is calling their protest “United Against Hatred, We are Here to Stay.”

    The group is holding their demonstration outside Federal Court on Church St. across from the New Haven Green. It is expected to last from 5 p.m. until 6:30 p.m.

    Throughout his presidential campaign, Trump made building a wall on the Southern Border a centerpiece of his immigration plan.

    Trump also says he wants to end sanctuary cities, where local police do not alert federal law enforcement of people living in the country illegally.

    New Haven is one of those cities with a population of undocumented immigrants, many of whom live in the Fair Haven neighborhood where Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) raids and deportations have taken place in the past.

    “Trump has given his followers permission to hate,” organizers wrote on the Facebook event page for the protest.

    “While in the past 8 years we have endured the highest-ever amount of deportations under Obama and expected to continue resisting the same from Clinton, a Trump presidency threatens the very fabric of our community. We gather without fear to say that our unity trumps his hate.”

    Another demonstration titled Solidary Rally (in wake of Donald Trump presidency) is scheduled for Friday afternoon at 5:30 p.m. on the New Haven Green, according to the event Facebook page.

    Tune into NBC Connecticut News at 5 and 6 for live coverage of the New Haven anti-Trump protest.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    A car hitting a pole in Naugatuck on Thursday night caused some power outages for residents in the area. 

    At 8 p.m., Naugatuck Police repsonded to the collision on Hill Street between May Street and High Street. 

    There were no serious injuries reported. 

    The utility pole will need to be replaced, police said.

    Utility crews are responding to the area and the road will remain closed until the pole is replaced.

    Drivers are asked to avoid the area. 



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    Despite Donald Trump's election victory, his campaign committee continues to seek money from supporters, calling into question the amount of debt the campaign racked up in the final days of the race, NBC News reported.

    An email to supporters with the subject line "Thank You," has a bright red "Contribute" button at the bottom of the email.

    Campaign finance law says a candidate can continue to raise money after Election Day to pay off any debts or to raise money for re-election.

    Debt is a possibility. At the end of the last fundraising report on Oct. 20, Trump had an uninspiring $16 million cash on hand and was also $2 million in debt.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    Republican president-elect Donald Trump delivers his acceptance speech as his son Barron Trump and wife Melania Trump looks on during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City.Republican president-elect Donald Trump delivers his acceptance speech as his son Barron Trump and wife Melania Trump looks on during his election night event at the New York Hilton Midtown in the early morning hours of November 9, 2016 in New York City.

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    A protest in Portland, Oregon, against Donald Trump's election boiled over into what police described as a "riot" overnight after some demonstrators armed with bats smashed stores and cars, and others lit fires.

    Police arrested 26 people, but said many in the crowd were trying to stop those responsible from vandalizing property.

    Trump initially tweeted saying that the "professional protesters" had been "incited by the media" and called the situation "very unfair!" He followed that up with a more positive message early Friday: "Love the fact that the small groups of protesters last night have passion for our great country. We will all come together and be proud!"

    People have taken to the streets in New York, San Francisco, Chicago, Denver and elsewhere, rallying around the slogan "not my president."



    Photo Credit: AP
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Several dozen students from various high schools in the Portland, Ore., metropolitan area gather in the city's downtown Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, to protest the election of Donald Trump.Several dozen students from various high schools in the Portland, Ore., metropolitan area gather in the city's downtown Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2016, to protest the election of Donald Trump.

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    A Central Connecticut State University student said he is trying to spread unity throughout campus after some students feel a Trump presidency could have their school divided.

    Dozens of CCSU students marched and chanted across campus Wednesday. Among them, Jose Diaz. The 23-year-old is an immigrant from Mexico. He's in the U.S. on a work permit and is part of program helping immigrants receive an education.

    After hearing Donald Trump won the presidency, he worries about his future here in the states.

    "I see the way he expresses the way towards immigrants, undocumented immigrants, and people overall. That specifically makes me scared," said Jose Diaz.

    Fueling the fear. Social media posts he receives. Some post, calling Diaz undocumented, and demanding his deportation.

    At the rally, Diaz said the criticisms were shouted not tweeted.

    "They were saying profanity," said Diaz.

    The rally's purpose students said wasn't to show opposition for Tump. Instead, to show unity among fellow organizations on campus. And unity for fellow students no matter who they support.

    "After they came and talked to us they understood it," said Diaz.

    Understanding. An idea without borders. And an idea Diaz said he hopes others will support. So everyone has the greatest future possible.

    "We define our future, it's the things that people do, and what we do together, is what our future will look like," said Diaz.

    Since the rally organizations here on campus have been supporting each other more students said.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    A report from the investigative arm of Congress finds the U.S. Army needs to do a better job of caring for injured soldiers in special units set up to care for troops wounded in combat, or who become seriously ill or injured in noncombat situations, NBC 5 Investigates in Dallas-Fort Worth and The Dallas Morning News report.

    Congress ordered the report after the news groups revealed hundreds of injured soldiers had complained of harassment, abuse and a lack of care from the commanders of warrior transition units or WTUs.

    Among the Congressional report's findings were that soldiers' complaints of mistreatment are not always reaching top Army officials with oversight of the Warrior Transition Units.

    More than a thousand miles from Washington D.C. in Frankston, Texas, the report feels like some vindication to retired Army Master Sgt. Ken Adams: "I knew I was right about how a lot of stuff was being done and how a lot of soldiers' lives were being impacted."



    Photo Credit: NBC 5 News

    Retired Army Master Sgt. Ken Adams is one of many injured soldiers who complained of mistreatment from commanders of Army Warrior Transition Units.Retired Army Master Sgt. Ken Adams is one of many injured soldiers who complained of mistreatment from commanders of Army Warrior Transition Units.

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    Life for the undocumented has always carried a level of risk and uncertainty. But now the election of Donald Trump to the presidency, after a campaign pledging mass deportation, has elevated their concern.

    "It means fear. It means careful," said Maru Galvan, who remains undocumented 16 years after she and her husband immigrated to California from Mexico, raising two children and opening a carpentry shop. "We have to be more careful."

    Since the election, there have been cases of undocumented workers hesitant to go to their job, and children of undocumented parents expressing fear of going to school, according to immigrant rights advocates. Some expressed concern that some who denounce the undocumented will be emboldened.

    "They think they have the right now to be violent, more racist," Galvan said.

    California is home to more than two million undocumented immigrants according to the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC).

    The undocumented population of Los Angeles County has been estimated as high as 800,000, or nearly 12 percent of the county's 10 million residents. Undocumented immigrants live in every county of the state with 170,000 estimated in San Diego County, according to the PPIC.

    The presence of undocumented immigrants has been a divisive issue for decades, with advocates for strict enforcement of immigration law insisting that those who entered the U.S. unlawfully simply have no legal right to stay.

    Supporters of extending rights to those without papers, including elected officials from the city, county and school district, came together in a coalition Thursday at Los Angeles City Hall. They offered reassurance to the undocumented that local government is not in sync with the policy positions and comments of the President-elect during his campaign -- creating a deportation force, building a wall along America's southern border, and requiring Mexico to pay for it.

    "California is unlike the rest of the country," said Hilda Solis, a member of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors.

    "We want people in the community to be calm and continue their daily lives," said Gil Cedillo, Los Angeles city councilman for the first district, which has a predominantly Latino population.

    "This city, this police department, will not cooperate with immigration," said Cedillo, referring to department policies not to inquire about immigration status in the course of responding to calls for service, nor to permit federal immigration enforcement officials to question people under their watch in jail.

    "Nothing has changed in LAPD polices," said Deputy Chief Robert Arcos.

    Los Angeles designated itself a sanctuary city decades ago, but some have expressed concern that under the incoming administration in Washington, federal funding to the city could be cut if it does not comply with immigration law.

    U.S. Senator-elect Kamala Harris offered her continued support for providing services to the undocumented during a noon hour visit to the office of the Coalition for Humane Immigration Reform of Los Angeles (CHIRLA).

    "At this point in time we are all being challenged to fight for our ideals," said Harris. She said she will join the push for the comprehensive immigration form that the Obama Administration has sought, but acknowledged the decreasing likelihood with Trump's presidency and Republicans holding a majority in both houses of Congress.

    Since 2012, an executive order by President Obama known as DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) has offered permits to stay that are renewable every two years. 

    "My main concern is the children. They have a lot of fear," said Vicky Cerpa, a CHIRLA volunteer who herself went a decade undocumented. She obtained legal residency through the amnesty granted by the the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act, signed by then-President Ronald Reagan.

    "You have scared children," said Steve Zimmer, board president of the Los Angeles Unified School District, directing his comments to President-elect Trump. "One of most important things you can do is make sure that children who have qualified for DACA know that they are safe and their status is secure."

    Opponents of Trump's announced crackdown on illegal immigration expressed the belief that as president he will find the wall and mass deportation not feasible. Other Trump critics said the emphasis should be on, not reassurance, but a call for action.

    "Our message to the community: don't mourn -- organize," said Nativo Lopez of Hermandad Mexicana, speaking with the coalition in city hall. "Yes my message is a tad different from the group here. Be concerned. Be alarmed. Rise and organize to defend your families. That is your God-given right," Lopez said.

    "The struggle is just beginning," said Cerpa, citing the impact of the election. "It didn't end. It's just beginning."



    Photo Credit: KNBC-TV

    Maru Galvan is undocumented and lives in Los Angeles County. She is fearful of being deported after Donald Trump was elected president.Maru Galvan is undocumented and lives in Los Angeles County. She is fearful of being deported after Donald Trump was elected president.

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    A man was killed in a crash after leading police on a high-speed chase that went through Connecticut and Massachusetts early Friday morning.

    Massachusetts State Police pursued the suspect when he drove through 91 Northbound in Longmeadow at high speed. The driver continued to flee from police before losing control and crashing while trying to take Exit 2 in Springfield.

    Police estimate the driver, who has not been identified yet, was driving around 100 mph before the crash.

    The driver was taken to Baystate Medical Center in Springfield where he died from his injuries. He was the only one in the vehicle, according to police.

    The incident remains under investigation.

    The highway has since been reopened for the morning commute.



    Photo Credit: WWLP

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    Four people were transported from an Enfield home to the hospital on Thursday night to be treated for exposure to carbon monoxide. 

    Firefighters responded to 104 South Road at 7:10 p.m. and found four people with symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning. 

    All four were transported and high levels of carbon monoxide were found in their blood, according to fire officials. 

    Firefighters left the scene just after 11 p.m. 

    The building is uninhabitable and officials said it appears someone tampered with the heating system.


    File photoFile photo

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    A 43-year-old man who answered a knock on his door in Hartford on Thursday night was shot by a stranger and police are investigating.

    Police responded to an apartment on Harold Street around 10:45 p.m. after a resident reported three gunshots and officers found a victim suffering from gunshot wounds to the chest and thigh, two spent 45-calibre bullet casings, a damaged magazine, five live 9 millimeter rounds and a hat at the bottom of the porch stairs, police said.

    Police said the man's wounds are not serious and he is in stable condition at Hartford Hospital.

    The victim told police he heard a knock on the door, so he opened it and someone he did not know shot him.

    The major crimes division was brought in and met with three witnesses who were in the apartment.

    Shotspotter did not go off, according to police.



    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

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    Dry, mostly sunny weather has set in and it will last through the weekend.

    Friday will be windy with a mix of sunshine and clouds. There's a chance for a sprinkle. Temperatures will be in the upper 50s.

    A wind advisory in in effect though tonight for inland Connecticut, excluding Litchfield County.

    It will be breezy and chilly on Saturday, though with more sunshine, as temperatures rise to near 50 degrees.

    Sunday should be completely sunny, with temperatures in the upper 50s.

    Early next week, Monday looks to be dry with highs near 60.

    The rainfall deficit (since 2015) will hit 20 inches in the Hartford area on Tuesday.

    It's possible that some rain is nearby Tuesday into Wednesday, but there's a great deal of uncertainty.

    The rain potential comes from a storm that will be offshore.

    Minor coastal flooding is also possible early next week as a result of a full moon, one that will be closer to earth than most other full moons.

    The storm could enhance the coastal flooding during high tide by a small amount.

    Dry weather likely returns Thursday.


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    Businesses across the nation are ready to show their appreciation for former and current members of the military. This Friday on Veterans Day, vets and service members can score deals and freebies on all sorts of goodies. See lots of them below, and find even more here.

    Applebee's
    Veterans and active-duty military members can each get a free meal from a limited menu on Veterans Day, plus a $5 coupon that can be redeemed Nov. 12-27. Proof of military service is required.

    Bar Louie
    Veterans and active military receive a free appetizer or entree today.

    Bonefish Grill
    Veterans and active duty military can enjoy free Bang Bang Shrimp. It's for dine-in only amd you must show a military I.D. 

    Bruegger's Bagels

    Bring your military ID to Bruegger's Bagels for a free small drip coffee.

    Buffalo Wild Wings
    Vets and military members can each get a free small order of traditional or boneless wings and a side of fries. Proof of military service is required. Proof includes permanent or temporary U.S. military ID cards, a DD 214, veteran's card or a photo of yourself in uniform, or if you're dining in uniform. This offer is available at participating locations only, so call your local spot in advance to check.

    California Pizza Kitchen
    Vets and military members can choose from a free pizza, full-size salad or pasta from a CPK's Veterans Day menu. You must show your military ID or other proof of service. Offer valid at participating locations, not including restaurants at airports, stadiums or universities.

    Chili's Bar & Grill
    Vets and military members can get a free meal from a special Veterans Day menu. Proof of military service required.

    Chipotle
    Veterans, service members and military spouses can buy one small burrito, bowl, salad or order of tacos and get a second one free. The offer is available on Veterans Day from 3 p.m. to closing. Proof of service is required.

    Denny's
    Vets and military members can get a free Build Your Own Grand Slam from 5 a.m. to noon. Valid military ID is required.

    Friendly's
    Veterans and active members of the military can get a free breakfast, lunch or dinner on Veterans Day. Must show valid military ID or honorable discharge card.

    IHOP
    Vets and active-duty military personnel can get a red, white and blue breakfast (buttermilk pancakes with glazed strawberries, blueberry compote and whipped topping). The free offer is available at participating locations between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Some locations will also offer a combo of two eggs, hashbrowns and two bacon strips or pork sausage links. Proof of military service required; can be U.S. Uniformed Services ID Card, U.S. Uniformed Services Retired ID Card, a current Leave and Earnings Statement (LES), veterans organization card (such as American Legion, VFW, etc.), a photo of yourself in U.S. military uniform, a DD214, military dogtags, citation or commendation, or show up in uniform.

    Krispy Kreme
    Vets and active-duty military personnel can get a free doughnut and small coffee at Krispy Kreme. No ID is required.

    Longhorn Steakhouse
    Veterans and active military get a free appetizer or dessert, plus 10 percent off the bill for the whole table.  

    On The Border 
    Vets and military members can receive a free Lunch Combo meal of their choice all day on Veterans Day. Military ID or proof of service required.

    Olive Garden
    Olive Garden restaurants will offer a free entrée from a special menu to active-duty military and military veterans. The special menu features six of Olive Garden's most popular items, it comes with unlimited soup and salad as well as breadsticks.

    Outback Steakhouse
    Free Bloomin' Onion and a Coca Cola for active and retired military who show I.D.

    Red Lobster
    Veterans, active-duty military members and reservists can enjoy a free appetizer or dessert from Red Lobster's Veterans Day menu on Nov. 10 and 11. Valid military ID required.

    Red Robin
    Veterans and active duty military can get a free Red's Tavern Double Burger and Bottomless Steak Fries. 

    Ruby Tuesday
    Bring your militaty ID to a Ruby Tuesday and get a free appetizer. 

    Starbucks
    Free Tall Brewed Coffee 

    Texas Roadhouse
    Free lunch. Click here for option.



    Photo Credit: Shutterstock

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    A Tolland High School senior who made it her mission to give back to wounded warriors donated a $1,000 check to an Enfield veteran on Friday. 

    Annalee Hughes made the donation in front of her classmates at Tolland High School. 

    The veteran she chose this year was Conor Beck, a retired U.S. Marine who served as a lance corporal E3 in Afghanistan. 

    Beck was wounded in June 2011 when his unit encountered an improvised explosive device. He suffered a traumatic brain injury, retired from the Marines and was awarded a Purple Heart. 

    "It's all about our veterans so I wanted to help them. I wanted to help them in any small way that I could," said Hughes, who started recycling for wounded warriors four years ago

    "I kind of got behind on medical bills and other financials, so it's definitely a huge thing to me to be able to knock some of that stuff out," Beck said. 

    Annalee was able to make the donation by collecting bottles and cans. 

    It started as a summer job, where she would go to the Tolland Senior Center once a week to collect the recycling. 

    But four years ago, she decided to give that money back to wounded warriors and every year has chosen a local veteran to donate to. 

    Once word spread throughout the community, donations started pouring in. 

    "Cars would come full of bottles and bags of bottles and cans and put them on the front door step and sometimes we can't even get in the door," said Milli Arnold, Annalee’s grandmother. "It's really heartwarming and it's wonderful for her because it gives her so much more purpose." 

    Even though Annalee will be graduating this year, she plans to continue recycling for wounded warriors and says "I am very proud to do it."



    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

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    Waterbury Hospital is on diversion after a patient who was transported to the hospital in cardiac arrest was found with a bag labeled as sodium cyanide.

    Officials from the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection said firefighters and medics responded to American Electroplating, at 1358 Thomaston Ave., because someone was suffering a health issue.  

    At the hospital, someone found a plastic bag in the patient's pocket that had sodium cyanide written on it and noticed powder the patient's clothing, according to DEEP.

    The fire department isolated the HVAC in the hospital, shut down the emergency department and crews isolated the ambulance, along with the engine and their crews. 

    Hospital staff members set a protocol into motion once the person was in the emergency department and ambulances were diverted to other hospitals, according to Waterbury Hospital officials.

    The hospital has hired an environmental contractor to decontaminate the ER and DEEP and the fire department are working on a plan for the apparatus and gear, DEEP officials said.

    Patients and staff are OK and the emergency department is accepting walk-in patients, according to hospital staff.



    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

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  • 11/11/16--09:43: Route 44 Closed in Ashford

  • Route 44 in Ashford is closed after a tree fell onto wires, according to state police.

    The road is closed between Route 79 and Route 89.

    It is not clear how long the road will be closed.

    State police are asking drivers to avoid the area.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    Donald Trump's transition team continued to fill out their list of potential cabinet picks, many of whom are part of the establishment, or, in Trump's words, part of the swamp that he promised to drain, NBC News reported.

    Sources told NBC News that Texas Rep. Mike McCaul, chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, is being considered for Secretary of Homeland Security; former Michigan Rep. Mike Rogers, a past chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, is on the list for Director of the CIA; while Texas Rep. Jeb Hensarling, chairman of the Financial Services Committee, is in the mix for Treasury Secretary.

    One of the more unexpected names to come up Thursday was JP Morgan CEO Jamie Dimon. Dimon's chief of staff confirmed to NBC News that, though Trump has had no formal conversation with him, some of Trump's senior advisers have told Dimon he would make an "excellent" Treasury Secretary.



    Photo Credit: AP

    President-elect Donald Trump and his wife Melania walk with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. on Capitol Hill, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016, after a meeting.President-elect Donald Trump and his wife Melania walk with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. on Capitol Hill, Thursday, Nov. 10, 2016, after a meeting.

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