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    Police have arrested a second suspect linked to the stabbing and killing a Sterling teen who went missing last month.

    Dustin Warren, of Sterling, was arrested and charged on Friday with tampering with evidence, hindering prosecution and interfering with a police officer.

    In January, the other suspect, Kevin Weismore, 19, was charged with the murder of 18-year-old Todd Jeremiah, or TJ, Allen. The arrest warrant said Weismore told police that he planned on selling marijuana to Allen and stabbed him after Allen pulled out a gun. 

    Police said they have not found a gun and Allen's mother, Christina Moses, said she doesn't believe her son ever owned one. 

    Allen had been reported missing just after 7:30 p.m. on Dec. 26 when he did not return home after leaving home to go dirt biking. Earlier this month, state police said they found Allen's body not far from Weismore's home. 

    Police obtained a search warrant for Allen's phone and records showed the last known location was in the area of Laiho Road, Margaret Henry Road and Sawmill Hill Road in Sterling, according to the arrest warrant.

    Weismore went on to tell police that he met up with Allen to sell marijuana to him, but Allen took a gun from his backpack, pointed it at the ground, said he did not have the money, then pointed the gun at him, according to the arrest warrant.  

    According to police, Weismore gave detectives information that led them to Allen's body in a wooded area near 61 Laiho Road. 

    “I knifed TJ, stabbing him in the stomach once using my right hand, and then stabbing him in the neck a few times. I stabbed him in the neck once and he kept moving so I did it a couple more times,” Weismore’s statement to police reads, according to the warrant.

    The statement goes on to say that Weismore dragged Allen’s body behind a rock pile to hide it, then threw the gun off a cliff. Weismore also said he burned all his clothing, according to police.

    The warrant said Weismore admitted to a friend what he’d done the next day and that friend helped him dump Allen’s dirt bike into a pond in Killingly.

    Warren's bond was set at $125,000. 


    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

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    Attorneys for the four suspects charged in a brutal attack streamed live on Facebook said after court Friday they want the group released from jail. 

    The public defenders held a news conference after the Friday hearing saying they want their clients released because they "are young people who do not deserve to be there."

    The attorneys argued the group should not be tried in the media and noted that in the days following their arrests, they have seen death threats spread across the Internet. 

    In court Friday, a judge ordered that sketches of the suspects not show their faces. State prosecutors agreed to proceed with an indictment while attorneys for the four asked that 911 tapes be preserved. 

    The group is expected to appear in court again Feb. 10. 

    Sisters Tanishia and Brittany Covington, Jordan Hill and Tesfaye Cooper face hate crime charges, as well as kidnapping and battery after Cook County prosecutors identified them as four black suspects seen in a racially charged attack on a white teenager that was broadcast live on social media. 

    Prosecutors say the group kidnapped and tortured a suburban 18-year old who has mental disabilities in the video, now seen by millions. 

    A Cook County judge ruled because of safety and security concerns, cameras will not be allowed in the courtroom.

    Lawyers for the defendants didn't want them shown because they say it could contaminate the jury pool.



    Photo Credit: Chicago Police Department

    Sisters Tanishia and Brittany Covington, Jordan Hill and Tesfaye Cooper face hate crime charges, as well as kidnapping and battery after prosecutors identified them as four suspects seen in an attack on a white teenager that was broadcast live on social media.Sisters Tanishia and Brittany Covington, Jordan Hill and Tesfaye Cooper face hate crime charges, as well as kidnapping and battery after prosecutors identified them as four suspects seen in an attack on a white teenager that was broadcast live on social media.

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    Syrian refugees, undocumented immigrants, and elected officials made their sentiments clear when it comes to the executive actions made by President Donald Trump in his first full week in office.

    They don't like it and they are going to fight back.

    On the issues of crackdowns on sanctuary cities, the ban of immigrants and refugees from some Arab nations, and the possible removal of protections from people who came to America as children but haven't reached citizenship, they were all represented at the State Capitol.

    “The process for coming here took about eight months and we went through six interviews," said Maher Al-Kalaf through an interpreter. "Each one was about four hours, so it was a kind of tiring process coming here.”

    Maher came to the United States with his wife and six children, after escaping from Syria during its Civil War.

    Supporters of his family said Connecticut needs to remain a haven for families and keep welcoming them. Maher said he was just looking for a better life.

    “The main reason for coming here is to find peace, security, and education for the kids," he said.

    Sen. Richard Blumenthal described Trump's executive orders as being, "contrary to American values and American constitutional law."

    On his order condemning what are known as , "sanctuary cities," Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin said the city hasn't violated any federal laws, but said police will not work to detain undocumented immigrants just because they reside in Hartford.

    He said, "We will not be bullied into enforcing policies that are unconstitutional or will make us less safe."

    One counter protester, who wouldn't give his full name, held up a sign across from where Trump protesters were in Hartford. He said when he heard about the rally, he thought it was important to make sure that people knew not everyone in Connecticut was against Trump's orders.

    Kevin said, “I don’t believe that we should be able to choose that we can enforce some laws but not others.”

    Eric Cruz Lopez says he's trying to live the American dream. Born in Mexico, he made his way to America when he was seven years old with his mother. He says he hoped Connecticut lawmakers continue to stand up to Trump, to allow him and his family to remain in Bridgeport.

    “I want to know that my community is going to be safe. I want to know that I’m going to be safe and I don’t just care for undocumented immigrants. I care for the rest of my communities in Connecticut and across this country.”



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    Under tight security concerts resumed at the Toyota Oakdale Theatre in Wallingford on Friday.

    The event called Hyperglow comes after the double deadly shooting following the Meek Mill concert in December.

    Two people were killed and two others were hurt.

    For Friday’s Hyperglow, there were extra police on patrol and ambulance crews on standby.

    “It’s a big party, lots of good music, lots of people dancing with each other,” Dan Schumann of Rocky Hill, said.

    This was the first concert since gunfire rang out in an Oakdale parking lot last month following a Meek Mill concert.

    “It definitely had some influence on my going (Friday). But all in all, I’d say it’s definitely a different crowd,” Vinny Penisse of Southington, said.

    Wallingford police were expected to have at least two officers at the theatre on Friday.

    That came after a meeting between law enforcement and Oakdale staff about security measures.

    The venue plans on a show-by-show basis to beef up its ranks with uniformed officers.

    “Definitely, I think that’s a lot more comforting than just brushing off what happened a few weeks ago,” Schumann said.

    In a statement on Thursday, the Oakdale wrote that it does not reveal its security plans but it depends on the concert and works with police.

    Those headed into the venue for Hyperglow say being safe take everyone’s work.

    “We have to be vigilant about what’s happening around us no matter where we are, especially at this event,” Nathan Desroberts of Higganum, said.

    The Oakdale did not return our requests for comment on Friday.

    And police are still searching for whoever opened fire there in December.



    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

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    As tax season gets underway, the Connecticut Department of Revenue Services (DRS) and the Internal Revenue Service are once again warning about the W-2 scam.

    According to the DRS, this email scam first appeared last year. It uses a corporate officer's name to request employee Forms W-2 from company payroll or human resources departments.

    “It can appear to come from where you work. It can look very real. It is very easy to do that and these are smart thieves by in large,” said Department of Revenue Services Commissioner Kevin Sullivan.

    Thinking it is a legitimate request, payroll and human resource officials have been tricked into sending employee names, social security numbers and income information.

    “That material that information was then used to create corporate tax returns and steal from these particular companies,” said Sullivan.

    This is not the only way people are being fooled before they file. On Friday, Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro, D-Third District, discussed the spike in IRS phone scams during tax season. She says her office has received numerous constituent complaints about these calls.

    “They dig up just enough information to sound legit,” DeLauro said.

    Manu Malhotra of Hartford says he has received that call many times. He says he has always handled the situation appropriately, but knows how convincing they can be.

    “I get a lot of calls fake calls saying I’m calling for the IRS, saying you have taxes pending so you don’t pay your taxes in next 10 to 15 minutes over the call, police will come to your home and arrest you,” said Malhotra.

    Congresswoman DeLauro promised to keep educating the public, but said everyone should be aware the IRS communicates by mail, not phone calls.

    “A real IRS agent would never ask for your credit card info over the phone, nor would they threaten you with arrest or discipline,” DeLauro said.

    In regards to the W-2 scam Sullivan says it never hurts to double check.

    “The boss won’t be mad, the head of payroll won’t be mad if you say I would like to get you that information but let me just confirm with the person that ordered it,” said Sullivan.

    He also recommends people contract DRS at (860) 297-5962 or outside the Hartford calling areas at (800) 382-9463 to make a report.



    Photo Credit: Bloomberg via Getty Images

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    Merriam-Webster defines "dictionary" as "a reference book listing alphabetically terms or names." But for President Donald Trump right now, the dictionary has become a sassy antagonist, NBC News reported.

    The one-hundred-and-sixty-some-year-old classroom fixture has been using Trump's favorite social media platform, Twitter, to correct his spelling, remind his advisers what "facts" are, and highlight a zeitgeist in which "fascism" has become one of the lexicon's most searched entries. 

    With successful tweets responding to scrutinized gaffs, including White House Counselor Kellyanne Conway's defense of "alternative facts," Merriam-Webster established itself as one of the few remaining arbiters of truth, one of the reasons its Twitter account now has more than 270,000 followers. The public reaction has been "big league," as the president might say.

    Lauren Naturale, the dictionary's Content and Social Media Manager told NBC News that the "response was overwhelmingly positive" to the tweets, adding they are "among the most viral tweets we've ever had."



    Photo Credit: Joanne K. Watson/Merriam-Webster via Getty Images

    In this handout image provided by Merriam-Webster, Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary and mobile website are displayed September 23, 2016 in Springfield, Massachusetts.In this handout image provided by Merriam-Webster, Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary and mobile website are displayed September 23, 2016 in Springfield, Massachusetts.

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    East Hartford police said they are investigating an overnight shooting outside of a convenience store on Main Street that has sent one person to the hospital.

    Police said the shooting took place this morning after 2:30 a.m. outside of Krauszer’s Food Store.

    The victim was alive when police arrived on scene and was rushed to the hospital, police said.

    According to police, the victim’s current condition and identity have not been released, nor do they have a description of the suspect at this time.

    Police said that no store employees were involved with the incident.

    The incident remains under investigation.

    If you may have witnessed this shooting or have any information related to the incident, please contact the East Hartford Police Department.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    Vernon police said they are investigating an overnight shooting in Rockville on Vernon Avenue where a vehicle was hit by several shots.

    According to police, the incident took place at around 2:00 a.m. on Saturday at the TKB social club.

    Police said that while they found that a vehicle had been stuck by gunfire several times, the people inside of it had not been hit.

    As many as seven hundred people may have been attending a dance party that was being held at the club on Friday night, police said.

    Vernon police are asking anyone who may have witnessed this shooting or has any information related to the incident to please contact them at 860-872-9126.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    A loving and caring mother. Those are the words Jeffrey Haynes used to describe his ex-wife, Maria Haynes after the Waterbury mother was killed in a hit-and-run Tuesday night.

    Jeffrey says just hours before the crash, Maria came by to see their two young daughters.

    "They were torn apart to know what they saw of her that day was the last they would ever see of their mother," said Jeffrey. "The girls are resilient and tough. They learned that from their mom because no matter what she was going through, she always kept her head up."

    Jeffrey says Maria had two other children from a previous marriage.

    David Watson says he and Maria were at the Hill Street Mini Mart that night when she decided to head home. She told him she'd see him soon.

    On Friday, Waterbury police released surveillance video showing a dark-colored SUV driving on Hill Street just moments after.

    "We are definitely asking for the public's assistance on this, anything that anybody may have seen," said Deputy Chief Fred Spagnolo.

    Police believe the vehicle involved is heavily damaged. Investigators say the vehicle should have damage to the passenger front headlight/grill area, hood, and possibly windshield.

    Jeffrey says he doesn't know how the person responsible can sleep at night.

    "Somebody has to know, and I hope and pray they have the courage to come forward," said Jeffrey.

    A candlelight vigil is planned for Saturday at 7 p.m. at 290 Hill Street.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

    A woman was struck and killed by a hit-and-run driver on Hill Street in Waterbury Tuesday night.A woman was struck and killed by a hit-and-run driver on Hill Street in Waterbury Tuesday night.

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    Bristol police said a solar panel energy company is placing misleading fliers that look like package delivery notices on doors around town hoping residents will call their company.

    The fliers are in the form of a sticky note that reads “Final Notice Please Call for Information.” The note provides a phone number and directs residents to call the number at certain times.

    Bristol police said the fliers are a form of advertising and do not violate any town ordinance, but said residents should only to call the number if they are interested in the solar panels.

    Meriden police warned of similar tags and called them a scam. That department warned the delivery tags could be a trick to get personal information or sell services by getting people to call the printed phone number. The state Department of Consumer Protection warned against calling the phone number.

    If you want to a file a state consumer complaint, contact the Department of Consumer Protection by calling (860) 713-6100 or (800) 842-2649 or email.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

    This is a sample of a fake delivery tag left on a door in Meriden.This is a sample of a fake delivery tag left on a door in Meriden.

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    Wallingford police arrested a Meriden man after a traffic stop lead to the seizure of more than 13 grams of marijuana and multiple MDMA, or “molly” capsules, police said Saturday.

    Police said they pulled over a vehicle on South Turnpike Road near the Oakdale Theatre around 10 p.m. Friday night for a traffic violation. When officers approached the car they smelled marijuana, police said. The occupants said they were headed t the Electronic Dance Music show at the Oakdale.

    Police searched the car and found 13 molly capsules and 13.7 grams of marijuana, police said.

    Andrew Dargon, 28, was arrested and charged with possession of narcotics. He also had two active arrest warrants and was charged with two counts of violation or probation, police said.

    He was released on a total of $42,000 in bonds and scheduled a court date of Feb. 10.

    The Oakdale Theatre was under tight security Friday after a deadly double shooting following a Meek Mill concert in December. 



    Photo Credit: Wallingford Police Department

    Andrew DargonAndrew Dargon

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    East Hartford police said a drunk driver crashed into a pole Saturday and caused serious damage that closed Main Street for several hours.

    Police allege that a female driver was drunk when she crashed her car into a pole in the area of Main Street and Pitkin Street around 2:45 a.m. That driver, who has not been identified, was charged with DUI.

    The crash took down traffic lights and wires and the road was closed for several hours while crews worked to make repairs.

    As of 1:30 p.m. the lights had been repaired and the road had reopened.


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    A group of protesters mobilized at John F. Kennedy Airport following the detainment of two Iraqi refugees Saturday morning.

    The demonstrators held homemade signs that read "No ban, no wall" and "Refugees welcome" in front of Terminal 4's international arrivals area Saturday afternoon. One sign even called for President Trump's impeachment and the deportation of the first lady.

    "We're here to tell Trump that we are not going anywhere," said lawyer and refugee advocate Jacki Esposito, who helped organize the protest. "Today is the beginning of a long opposition from us, and our neighbors all over the country."

    Within hours, several groups of protesters gathered at the airport as word of the demonstration spread on social media.

    The New York Taxi Workers Alliance also joined the protest, drawing attention to the anti-Muslim violence suffered by their Sikh and non-Muslim brown drivers.

    "Today, drivers are joining the protest at JFK Airport in support of all those who are currently being detained #NoBanNoWall," the nonprofit organization tweeted.

    U.S. Representatives Jerry Nadler and Nydia Velazquez met with Customs and Border Patrol supervisors at the airport as the two worked to provide legal access to the detainees.

    "These are people who are no threat to the United States and who have worked with the armed forces for years and who were given visas on those basis," said Nadler. "It is shameful not to mention [that they've worked with the US for years] and probably implies religious discrimination."

    "It is a sad day for the American people. This is not who we are, this is an affront to our American values," said Velazquez. "This is a matter of life and death. These types of actions undermine our national security, and our president, Donald Trump, doesn't get it."

    In a statement posted to his Twitter account, Gov. Andrew Cuomo called the words inscribed at the foot of the Statue of Liberty to remind people that America is a melting pot, not a divider, of cultures.

    "We are a nation of bridges, not walls, and a great many of us still believe the words 'give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses...'," he said. "This is not who we are. And not who we should be."

    Community organizer Daniel Altschuler and Reform Immigration For America, an immigrant rights advocacy group, also attempted to free the refugees from custody, but were turned away and asked to leave the airport, Altschuler said in a tweet.

    "We were just thrown out of airport for being here to free refugees. Told we have no "legitimate purpose." #MuslimBan @RI4A @AmericasVoice," he tweeted.

    Altschuler noted that CBP officials initially didn't allow Nadler or Velazquez to see the detained refugees. At around noon, he tweeted that the White House didn't provide guidance to CBP on what to do with the other detainees.

    Nearly four hours after news of the detainment broke, Rep. Nadler announced that one of the Iraqi detainees, Hameed Jhalid Darweesh, was released from custody.

    "Pleased to announce w/@NydiaVelazquez the release of Hameed Jhalid Darweesh from detention at JFK," he tweeted.

    Nadler added that he was working with Velazquez to release 11 other refugees who are being held at U.S. airports.

    Two Syrian families who arrived at Philadelphia International Airport from Doha, Qatar were briefly detained by Customs and Border Patrol officials before they were sent home on an 18-hour return flight, according to a family member from Allentown, Pennsylvania.

    The detainment comes just a day after President Donald Trump signed an executive order temporarily closing U.S. borders to refugees of Muslim-majority nations for 90 days, and for Syrian refugees, indefinitely.

    The order also suspended a program that last year in the U.S. resettled 85,000 people displaced by war, political oppression and religious prejudice.



    Photo Credit: NBC New York
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    Waterford police are looking to identify two suspect accused of stealing over $200 worth of merchandize from an Ulta beauty supply store.

    Police said the incident happened on Jan. 26 around 8:30 p.m. at the store in the Waterford Commons.

    Anyone who recognizes the suspects pictured above is asked to contact Waterford police at 860-442-9451.



    Photo Credit: Waterford Police Department

    Waterford police said the subjects pictured above are accused of stealing over $200 in merchandise from an Ulta store at the Waterford Commons.Waterford police said the subjects pictured above are accused of stealing over $200 in merchandise from an Ulta store at the Waterford Commons.

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    “Cutting off a dream.” That’s the reaction from a Syrian man living in Connecticut to President Trump’s actions on refugees.

    Other refugees headed to the state are now in limbo.

    Integrated Refugee & Immigrant Services has helped more than 500 refugees, many from Syria, settle in the state in the last year. Today NBC Connecticut spoke to a man from Syria who is one of many affected by President Trump’s swift moves yesterday.

    “It’s a bad feeling. We can’t understand why,” said Mohamad Chaghlil of New Haven.

    Chaghlil arrived in New Haven weeks ago after escaping war-torn Syria. His mother was supposed to follow but is now stuck in Jordan uncertain of when she can come to the US.

    Less than 24 hours after President Donald Trump enacted travel restrictions the effects are being felt across the world, including at Integrated Refugee & Immigrant Services in New Haven.

    “We have a long list on our calendar of families that are supposed to arrive next week, the week after, the week after that, and they won’t be coming,” IRIS Executive Director Chris George said.

    The president ordered a clamp down on refugee entry and a temporary restriction on travelers from seven predominately Muslim countries. President Trump argues his plan will help keep “radical Islamic terrorists” out of the country. But several human rights groups have blasted the orders, calling them harmful.

    “The more you think about it, it was a dark day for America. Welcoming refugees to the United States is our oldest, most noble tradition,” George said.

    Refugee advocates hope the outcry will force the president to change his mind.

    And for one refugee, he would like Americans to think about why people would flee their country and want to restart their lives elsewhere.

    “It’s a very bad situation. Everybody has to think about the other side always,” Chaghlil said.

    The president’s executive order blocked refugees from coming to the US for four months. It indefinitely banned Syrian refugees and it restricts people from six other countries for three months.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

    Mohamad ChaghlilMohamad Chaghlil

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    Less than 24 hours after President Donald Trump signed an executive order clamping down on refugee admissions and temporarily restricting travelers from seven predominantly Muslim countries, the impact was already resonating at airports around the world.

    The Trump administration has yet to issue guidance to airports and airlines on how to implement the executive order. "Nobody has any idea what is going on," a senior Homeland Security official told NBC News.

    Protesters gathered at John F. Kennedy Airport where 12 refugees were detained Saturday. The New York Taxi Workers Alliance said Saturday that it would stop all pickups at JFK from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. ET in solidarity with protesters. 

    Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe said that a family was detained at Dulles International Airport, where demonstrators were also gathering.

    West coast activists were set to host a #MuslimBan protest at 3 p.m. PST Saturday at the international arrivals section of San Francisco International Airport. Protesters are expected to be carrying signs that say #NotInOurName, #NeverAgain, END the #MuslimBan and I STAND WITH MUSLIM TRAVELERs, according to an event page.

    Protests were also set for Los Angeles International Airport, Philadelphia International Airport and various others throughout the country.

    This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Protestors rally during a demonstration against the Muslim immigration ban at John F. Kennedy International Airport, January 28, 2017 in New York City.Protestors rally during a demonstration against the Muslim immigration ban at John F. Kennedy International Airport, January 28, 2017 in New York City.

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    Demonstrations are taking place at multiple airports and in multiple cities across America over an order signed Friday by President Trump that restricts travel into the U.S. for people from certain Middle Eastern and North African countries.

    Photo Credit: Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

    Protestors rally during a protest against the Muslim immigration ban at John F. Kennedy International Airport, Jan. 28, 2017, in New York City. President Trump signed a controversial executive order the day before that halted refugees and residents from predominantly Muslim countries from entering the United States.Protestors rally during a protest against the Muslim immigration ban at John F. Kennedy International Airport, Jan. 28, 2017, in New York City. President Trump signed a controversial executive order the day before that halted refugees and residents from predominantly Muslim countries from entering the United States.

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    New Haven police are investigating after a person was shot in the area of Level and Lodge Streets Saturday night. 

    Police said they were called to the scene around 7 p.m. 

    The victim, whose identity has not been released, was brought to Yale New Haven Hospital where he is listed in stable condition. 

    According to authorities, he is being treated for a gunshot wound to his leg. 

    Police said a suspect has not been identified yet and the incident remains under investigation. 



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    A federal judge blocked the government from deporting immigrants being held due to President Donald Trump's executive immigration order, an attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union, which filed the complaint, told MSNBC's Chris Hayes.

    The stay applies only to those currently within the U.S., but not to anyone who tries to come to the U.S. going forward. And it does not mean detainees will be released, only that they can't be deported, according to ACLU attorneys.

    This is a developing story. Please stay tuned for updates.


    A demonstrator in San Francisco holds a sign in protest of an executive order placing travel restrictions on those from certain Middle Eastern and North African countries and restricting refugees from entering the U.S.A demonstrator in San Francisco holds a sign in protest of an executive order placing travel restrictions on those from certain Middle Eastern and North African countries and restricting refugees from entering the U.S.

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    Vernon police are investigating after one person was shot at a home on Talcott Avenue Saturday night. 

    Police said the victim, who has not yet been identified, was transported to by helicopter to Hartford Hospital. 

    Other details about the shooting or the victim were not made immediately available. 

    Police said the incident remains under investigation and more details will be released as they become available. 



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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