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  • 06/01/17--10:43: Bear Kills Donkey in Kent

  • A black bear attacked and killed a pet donkey on Fuller Mountain Road in Kent on May 21.

    Megg Hoffman said she did not hear any noises the morning she found her donkey, Radar, dead and two of her other three donkeys hurt but there were signs of a bear on the property days earlier.

    The week before Radar was killed Hoffman found bear paw prints in her barn and it appeared the bear had broken in, but did not hurt the animals.

    She believes it was the same bear that returned a week later and killed Radar.

    Radar and weighed approximately 270 pounds and officials with the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection estimate the bear weighs about 300 pounds.

    DEEP set a trap to try and catch the bear, but it was not successful so they removed it after about a week.

    “If you don’t catch an animal within that time, you’re either not likely to catch it and the bear’s moved on, or every day that goes by, there’s less likelihood that you know for sure if that was the bear involved in this particular attack,” Dennis Schain, spokesperson for DEEP, said. “If you get it right away, it’s probably the one that was there because it’s coming back for more.”

    Hoffman said the donkeys typically are in a fenced-off area. She has now added an electric fence and is putting the donkeys in the barn at night.

    Hoffman said she wants the bear killed.



    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

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    A casino, hotel and event complex in the Philippine capital of Manila is on lockdown amid reports of gunfire and explosions early Friday local time, NBC News reports.

    "We ask for your prayers during these difficult times," Resorts World Manila tweeted on the verified account.

    The U.S. State Department is urging people to avoid the area, which is near Ninoy Aquino International Airport.

    Unverified photos and videos on social media indicated gunfire and explosions in the area, and first responders were seen at the complex. Officials did not comment on details of the incident. NBC News could not immediately confirm the pertrators or injuries.

    White House spokesman Sean Spicer tweeted that President Donald Trump has been briefed about the situation.



    Photo Credit: Bullit Marquez/AP
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Smoke rises from the Resorts World Manila complex early Friday, June 2, 2017, in Manila, Philippines. Gunshots and explosions rang out early Friday at a mall, casino and hotel complex near Manila's international airport in the Philippine capital, sparking a security alarm amid an ongoing Muslim militant siege in the country's south.Smoke rises from the Resorts World Manila complex early Friday, June 2, 2017, in Manila, Philippines. Gunshots and explosions rang out early Friday at a mall, casino and hotel complex near Manila's international airport in the Philippine capital, sparking a security alarm amid an ongoing Muslim militant siege in the country's south.

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    Branford police are trying to get two very expensive woman’s rings back to their rightful owner.

    Police said patrol officers received the rings within the past 10 days after someone at a local restaurant misplaced them and they are now being held for safe keeping until they can be returned to the owner.

    Police are not releasing descriptions of the rings or where they were found to eliminate the possibility of fraudulent claims for the jewelry.

    Anyone who has lost or misplayed rings should call Detective Ryan Tobin at 203-481-4241 and provide a detailed description of the jewelry.



    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

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    Flyers that warn about penalties for supporting illegal immigration have been posted in Washington, D.C., and the city's mayor is telling people to remove them.

    Official-looking flyers with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security logo and the words U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement say "SANCTUARY CITY NEIGHBORHOOD PUBLIC NOTICE" and warn of jail time.


    But ICE says they did not post the flyers.

    “The immigration enforcement notices appearing across Washington, D.C. were not issued or sanctioned by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE)," a spokeswoman said.

    "Just like false reports of immigration checkpoints or random sweeps, notices like these are dangerous and irresponsible," the spokeswoman continued. "Any person who actively incites panic or fear of law enforcement is doing a disservice to the community, endangering public safety and the very people they claim to support and represent.”


    D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser instructed residents to tear down the flyers. "DC is a sanctuary city. Clearly the flyer is meant to scare and divide our residents. We won't stand for it. #DCValues," she wrote.


    D.C. police and the Department of Public Works also have been told to take them down. 

    The flyer cites portions of U.S. immigration law and lists phone numbers for ICE and U.S. Customs and Border Protection tip lines.

    It's not clear who posted the flyers. 

    D.C. is a proud sanctuary city that issues provisional driver's licenses to undocumented residents. Police do not ask about residency status, and in January Bowser announced the creation of a legal defense fund to help immigrants.

    Stay with News4 for more details on this developing story.



    Photo Credit: Twitter/BalkansBohemia
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    Fake ICE flyer posted in Washington, D.C.Fake ICE flyer posted in Washington, D.C.

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    The National Weather Service confirmed the same storm that prompted Wednesday's tornado warnings in Connecticut produced an EF-1 tornado in New York.

    The tornado touched down in the Town of Wappinger New York which is located in Dutchess County, on the Connecticut border.

    It was estimated that the tornado initially touched down at 7:14 p.m. and was on the ground for 1.25 miles.

    The weather service says that maximum winds were estimated at 100 mph.

    Luckily nobody was injured, however there was extensive damage. Damage included numerous snapped trees and a roof that was lifted off a shed. 



    Photo Credit: Josh Searles

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    ShopRite in West Haven is closing at the end of July.

    The market at 1131 Campbell Ave. will close on July 29 and 148 employees will be affected, according to the notice given to the Connecticut Department of Labor.

    "The closure has been prompted by the company's decision to discontinue the operation of business at that location," a letter ShopRite sent to the Department of Labor says. 



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    Clinton police are searching for the man who stole a donation jar at a Shell Gas station.

    The theft at the gas station on High Street was reported at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, police said.

    The man is seen taking a donation jar from the cashier counter when the clerk turns around and walks away for a brief moment, surveillance video purports. The suspect hides the jar under is jacket and walks out of the gas station, police said.

    The owner of the Shell Gas station is Syrian and police said the jar was collecting money for various human right efforts for victims of the war in Syria.

    The suspect is described as being in his twenties, with long hair and heavy set. He was seen wearing a maroon “Kyrie Irving” Cleveland Cavaliers basketball jersey. After stealing the donation jar, he got into a silver SUV, which is believed to be a Chevy.

    Anyone with any information is asked to contact the Clinton Police at (860) 669-0451.



    Photo Credit: Clinton Police Department

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    The Dairy Bar and the Jones Building at UConn in Storrs were evacuated after a construction crew working at the site of an old barn that burned down earlier this month hit a gas line but the scene is now clear.

    A university spokesperson said crews were “flattening” the ground when they hit the line around 11 a.m.

    People were kept from the area because of elevated gas readings, but electricity was never turned off to the Dairy Bar so the ice cream remained refrigerated.

    No one was been injured and the accident happened after summer break began, so few people are on campus. 

    The construction crew was working at the site of a three-alarm fire earlier this month that destroyed a historic 1922 barn that was adjacent to the Dairy Bar and several other buildings.

    The barn contained landscaping equipment, tools and office space.

    The contractor is working on a project to level the area where the barn was and reconnect an underground water line that serves nearby pastures.




    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    The City of New Haven has released its plan to revamp Union Station.

    As part of the city's "100 Years Forward" initiative, the city detailed its $65 million plan to renovate the historic building. 

    "After recent news of Aetna’s increasingly likely departure from Connecticut, it is now more important than ever for the state to act boldly to develop dense, vibrant urban spaces that attract workers, jobs, and investment," Mayor Toni N. Harp said. "In this plan, the City and Park New Haven are prepared to make Union Station fulfill its potential as both a gateway to the state and an iconic hub of a developing mixed-use neighborhood."

    The project includes a new 645-space parking garage, train station amenities, intermodal transit connectivity and critical station maintenance.

    The plan is to spend $21 million  for necessary upgrades to the building's structural and mechanical  systems, $26 million for the parking garage that will include bike and pedestrian facilities and $15 million towards Union Station's retail stores and restaurants. 

    “Perched at the crossroads of MetroNorth, Amtrak, and the new Hartford-to-Springfield line, Union Station is poised to become Connecticut’s own version of Grand Central Terminal,” Harp added. “This city recognized the potential built into Union Station a generation ago, when the state was about to tear it down, and has since brought it all the way back to solvency and profitability. Now, New Haven is ready to commit to this project for the long term, in the best interests of the city, region, and state.”

    The city said Union Station in New Haven has more than 700,000 Amtrack customers and more than one million Metro-North riders passing through. 



    Photo Credit: City of New Haven

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    World leaders on Thursday reacted quickly to President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw from the Paris climate change agreement, with former Vice President Al Gore calling the move "reckless and indefensible." 

    Negotiated by 195 countries, the agreement is aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions that are contributing to climate change. While it is not a binding treaty, the agreement calls on countries to make voluntary national pledges to reduce emissions and provide periodic updates on their progress.

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    The U.K.'s representatives in the United Nations released a statement calling Trump's decision "tragic" that Trump "has so little regard for the long-term future country."

    In statements prior to Trump's official announcement, China, Germany, the U.K. and Russia all reaffirmed their commitment to the Paris Accord and slowing climate change. 

    Some top Republicans, however, supported the move.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images
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    Al Gore, left, and Elon Musk were among the world and business leaders who reacted to President Donald Trump's decision to leave the Paris Accord on June 1, 2017.Al Gore, left, and Elon Musk were among the world and business leaders who reacted to President Donald Trump's decision to leave the Paris Accord on June 1, 2017.

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    President Donald Trump in announcing the U.S. withdrawal from the climate change agreement, said, “I was elected to represent the citizens of Pittsburgh, not Paris.”

    Maybe he should have chosen a different city.

    Pittsburgh’s Mayor Bill Peduto, a Democrat, quickly tweeted that Hillary Clinton had received 80 percent of his city’s vote.

    “As the Mayor of Pittsburgh, I can assure you that we will follow the guidelines of Paris Agreement for our people, our economy and future,” Peduto wrote.

    Peduto is part of global coalition of city leaders leaders committed to mitigating climate change in cities. Last year, he addressed a lunch hosted by the World Affairs Council of Pittsburgh, which cited his experience in building a new economy in the city and making it a leader in green initiatives.


    The city’s Office of Sustainability notes that Pittsburgh is working to reduce greenhouse gas emissions within the city limits and mitigate its contribute to global climate change.

    “We have already begun to experience the effects of climate change in Pittsburgh with colder winters, and we know Pennsylvania can expect longer and hotter summers, decreased winter snowpack and increased rainfall,” the city’s website says. “We need coordinated, concentrated and comprehensive carbon mitigation action now to reduce the severity of regional impacts and prepare for a low carbon economy.”

    Trump carried Pennsylvania in a close race, but in a recent poll received poor marks on climate and the environment. A Franklin & Marshall University poll in May found that although he gets strong support from Republicans and conservatives, just over half the state's voters gave him an "F" in climate change and the environment. 


    Perhaps Pittsburg, Kansas, would have been a better choice for the comparison. Crawford County voted overwhelmingly for Trump, giving him 57 percent of the vote to 34 percent for Clinton.



    Photo Credit: Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP
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    President Donald Trump speaks about the U.S. role in the Paris climate change accord, Thursday, June 1, 2017, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington.President Donald Trump speaks about the U.S. role in the Paris climate change accord, Thursday, June 1, 2017, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington.

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    Top lawmakers met with Gov. Dannel Malloy Thursday morning, six days before the adjournment date for the General Assembly, and they said they will not be able to reach an agreement by the end of the regular session.

    Rep. Joe Aresimowicz, the Speaker of the Connecticut House, said lawmakers have decided that their new deadline to come up with a budget compromise is June 30.

    The date is not arbitrary, as that's the last day of the state's fiscal year.

    Lawmakers would have to call themselves into a Special Session for the second straight time in order to pass a budget. Similar fiscal crises sent the General Assembly into a Special Session in 2015, and in order to balance the 2016 budget, lawmakers met in a Special Session last year.

    Sen. Len Fasano, (R- North Haven), the top Republican in the Connecticut Senate, said a nonpartisan analysis of spending plans showed there is only agreement on 25 percent of spending issues. 

    Gov. Malloy acknowledged that chasm and added that there are big gaps between Democrats and Republicans on everything from municipal aid to how to raise revenue.

    "I've wanted to get this done sooner rather than later," Malloy said. "That's why I've convened people and tried to move this along. I'm trying."






    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

    File photoFile photo

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    NBC Connecticut Meteorologists are tracking showers and thunderstorms moving through the state.

    The thunderstorms are capable of producing gusty winds and small hail. 

    The thunderstorm threat will come to an end statewide by 7 p.m. 

    Here's a look at interactive radar which shows the showers and thunderstorms moving across the state. 



    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

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    A father and son have been arrested after a barricade situation at a building in West Haven on Wednesday.

    Reports of an argument between someone with a gun and another with a wrench prompted a large police presence at the Armstrong Building on Saw Mill Road near the West Haven train station at approximately 12:04 p.m.

    The SWAT team was called to the former factory building and people were evacuated. 

    Mark J. Fabrizi, 49, and his son Mark T. Fabrizi, 26, both from Startford, were arrested and charged with assaulting two other men, police said. One victim suffered serious injuries, while the other had minor ones. 

    The father was chaged with assault with a firearm, unlawful restraint, assault, threatening, reckless endangerment and disorderly conduct.

    The son was charged with conspiracy to commit Assault with a firearm and conspiracy to commit unlawful restraint.

    Saw Mill Road was closed from Railroad Avenue to Elm Street and police urged people to avoid the area during the incident. 



    Photo Credit: West Haven Police Department

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    Some results of water quality testing in Plainville have been released. 

    "The test results show the water is safe to drink, although it's very hard," Plainville Town Manager Robert Lee said.

    Lee said more than 150 residents complained about the water quality, submitting complaints like: the water smells, it's hard and it tastes bad.

    "I wash with the Plainville water and I drink water from Maine," Jim Charette, a Plainville resident, told NBC Connecticut.

    Nearly two months ago, state and local officials tested the water affecting more than 6,000 homes.

    All of the results  of the water testing were not readily available, but some were, like the one from the Connecticut Department of Public Health. 

    "Based on feedback from CTDPH toxicologist there were no health concerns identified with the water quality results," the Connecticut Department of Public Health's report said. 

    On June 8, the town plans to present all results at a public forum, where the public is encouraged to ask questions on the findings and possible solutions. 

    "Whether the hardness should be dealt with on a system-wide basis or it should be dealt with on an individual basis," Lee said.

    The forum will be on June 8 at the Plainville Middle School at 7 p.m.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    A 76-year-old man is accused of having sexual contact with a minor, police said. 

    Frank P. Venn, of New Haven, was arrested at his home on 68 Oakley Street last week.

    Glasonbury Police said Venn's arrest on May 24 stems from an investigation by the department's youth unit.

    Venn was charged with fourth-degree sexual assault, risk of injury to a child/impairing morals and risk of injury to a child/sexual contact, police said.

    His bond was set at $250,000. 


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    President Donald Trump's decision to withdraw from the Paris climate change agreement will endanger human health and make it hard to prevent even more damage from global warning, medical groups said Thursday, reported NBC News.

    Many studies clearly lay out the risks from climate change — including respiratory and heat-related illnesses, insect-borne infections, water-borne diseases, and threats to safe food and water.

    A 2015 study found that a rise in the average summer temperature of just under 2 degrees F led to a 1 percent higher death rate in New England, for instance.

    Heat can raise blood pressure and worsen cholesterol levels. Longer, hotter summers can aid the spread of mosquitoes that carry diseases such as malaria, dengue, Zika and yellow fever — and warmer winters may fail to kill off populations of the insects.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    In this photo, a sign from wetter times warns people not to dive from a bridge over the Kern River, which has been dried up by water diversion projects and little rain, on February 4, 2014 in Bakersfield, California.In this photo, a sign from wetter times warns people not to dive from a bridge over the Kern River, which has been dried up by water diversion projects and little rain, on February 4, 2014 in Bakersfield, California.

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    A Hamden man is accused of possessing child pornography, police said. 

    Starting in February 2015, Hamden Police started an investigation regarding child pornography allegedly belonging to Luis Rivas-Vasquez.

    Rivas-Vasquez's computer equipment was seized by police from his residence at 25 Willow Street. 

    Police discovered 13 movie files of suspected child pornography. 

    The 56-year-old turned himself in at the Hamden Police Headquarters on May 31.

    Rivas-Vasquez was charged with possession of child pornography and his bond was set at $35,000. 



    Photo Credit: Hamden Police Department

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    President Donald Trump announced his intention for the United States to leave the Paris climate agreement on Thursday in a lengthy and rambling speech that veered into inaccurate territory several times, NBC News reported.

    In his speech, Trump painted a picture of a global cabal dictating America's actions and economy.

    "We can't build the [coal] plants, but [China] can, according to this agreement," Trump said.

    But the Paris accord doesn't bar America, or any of the countries that are a part of it, from doing anything.



    Photo Credit: AP

    President Donald Trump speaks about the U.S. role in the Paris climate change accord, Thursday, June 1, 2017, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington.President Donald Trump speaks about the U.S. role in the Paris climate change accord, Thursday, June 1, 2017, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington.

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    The Connecticut Medical Examiner’s Office released new details into the death of 15-month-old Michael Citron.

    In December 2016, Citron died in a foster home under the care of the Department of Children and Families (DCF). The new report shows that Citron died from acute chlorpheniramine intoxication administered by someone else.Chlorpeniramine is a specific type of cold and allergy medication that is available over the counter.

    The “manner of death”, a metric used to determine whether a death was a homicide, natural or accident was ruled “undetermined”.

    This month, the Connecticut Office of the Child Advocate said in a report that chlorpheniramine can cause central nervous system excitation, hallucinations, seizures and cardiac dysrhythmias, or improper beating of the heart

    Both the Bridgeport Police Department and the DCF have ongoing investigations into baby Citron's death. Neither responded to requests from NBC Connecticut regarding the newly released report.

    "This is a catastrophic failure of the system that was supposed to provide for Michael Citron's safety and now he is dead,” family attorney Chris Kenworthy said. He is representing the biological mother as the death investigations are ongoing. "Our intention is to figure out what happened and to hold the agencies and individuals responsible accountable.”

    Kenworthy said state agencies have kept the Citron family in the dark while waiting for the autopsy report and other records.

    “DCF should be an open book with the interest of preventing this from happening in the future,” Kenworthy said.

    DCF has long been criticized for the death of children in their care. A month before Citron’s death, politicians criticized DCF Commissioner Joette Katz for her handling of numerous cases of child deaths.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecituct

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