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    A day after burying her daughter, the mother of a woman killed during Saturday’s white nationalist rally in Charlottesville said she has received death threats. She also criticized President Donald Trump’s claim that violence on "both sides" lead to her daughter's death.

    "Whether there was violence on both sides or not is irrelevant," Bro told MSNBC's Katy Tur. "The guy mowed my daughter down and, sorry, that’s not excusable."

    In the exclusive interview, Bro said that the White House has reached out to her three times since her daughter’s death, but that she hasn’t had a chance to speak to President Trump.

    Despite the threats, Bro said she refuses to live in fear and has vowed to continue to carry on her daughter’s legacy by establishing a foundation in her name.



    Photo Credit: AP Photo/Joshua Replogle
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    Susan Bro, the mother of Heather Heyer, holds a photo of Bro's mother and her daughter, Monday, Aug. 14, 2017, in Charlottesville, Virginia. Heyer was killed Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017, when police say a man plowed his car into a group of demonstrators protesting the white nationalist rally. Bro said that she is going to bare her soul to fight for the cause that her daughter died for.Susan Bro, the mother of Heather Heyer, holds a photo of Bro's mother and her daughter, Monday, Aug. 14, 2017, in Charlottesville, Virginia. Heyer was killed Saturday, Aug. 12, 2017, when police say a man plowed his car into a group of demonstrators protesting the white nationalist rally. Bro said that she is going to bare her soul to fight for the cause that her daughter died for.

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    Eight attached condos lifted right off their foundation on Thursday as crews worked on the failing concrete basements underneath.

    The building represents eight of the 46 condo units in the Lakeview Complex in Vernon. Eleven have concrete crumbling so badly that the only thing owners can do is replace the basement walls and foundations.

    Ed Oswecki figured out pretty quickly his condo association had a problem with crumbling concrete after noticing his own basement was collapsing. He originally showed the NBC Connecticut Troubleshooters the damage in January.

    Oswecki and fellow condo owners knew they had to act fast. They now have contractor Don Childree making a massive repair. First he jackhammered out much of the old concrete, disconnected all the utilities, slid steel girders in, put wood cribbing underneath the girders, then lifted the 336 ton building with 26 hydraulic lifts. This cost the condo owners almost one million dollars. They are all footing the bill on their own.

    State Representative Tim Ackert came by to see the condos getting lifted. He says many others in his district have the crumbling concrete issue, but not the means to pay for it. Ackert, along with fellow lawmakers from the affected area, believe they need to come up with some kind of aid, even if it is not a complete solution, in the upcoming special session involving the state budget.

    There’s no word yet on when that special session will take place though.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    The Office of the Hartford Registrars of Voters has received a fine of nearly $10,000 for the debacle that unfolded at polling locations across the city on election day in November 2014.

    A newly released settlement outlines what the State Elections Enforcement Commission (SEEC) found were was failures by the Registrars of Voters office leading up to and during the election.

    Nearly three years later, representatives from the SEEC found that what occurred on election day in 2014 was, "nothing short of a statewide embarrassment."

    Voter lists were not delivered to polling places on time causing 14 locations to open late or open without those lists. In fact, the voting list for the Hartford Seminary polling place, where the governor voted, did not arrive until after 7 a.m. The SEEC also found that moderators at the affected locations were not instructed how to handle the problems.

    The investigation was not able to determine exactly how many voters were turned away or how many voters might have decided to stay home when word of the problems spread.

    Then-Democratic registrar, Olga Vazquez, defended her office back in 2014.

    "Everyone seems to be pointing fingers here," Vazquez said in the evening of November 4, 2014. "Let's look at the whole process. We need to look at this and say collectively how can we improve moving forward."

    The SEEC found of Vazques, that her, "wantonly poor decision making reflected either a too-casual approach to her work, or a serious deficiency in her ability to do her job."

    The review also found the following:


    • Failure to Timely Deliver Registry Lists to Moderators.
    • Failure to Timely Mark Off Absentee Ballot Voters from the Registry List.
    • Failure to Timely Deliver a Final Registry List to the Town Clerk.
    • Failure to Timely Open a Polling Place.
    • Failure to Properly Check in Voters During the Hours of Voting.
    • Failure to Deliver List of Polling Place Moderators to the Secretary of the State.
    • Failure to Resolve Discrepancies in the Results.


    In 2014, there were two other Registrars besides Vazquez. The SEEC found those three registrars had adequate time to prevent problems but did not work together effectively, which resulted in what was a “slowly unfolding calamity”.

    The Hartford Registrars of Voters office was ordered to pay a civil penalty of $9,600.

    Vazquez, meanwhile, has since been succeeded by someone else. Despite attempts, NBC Connecticut has not yet been able to reach Vazquez for comment.

    Read the full State Elections Enforcement Commission here:

    [[440937853, C]]

    Hartford Corporation Counsel Howard Rifkin released this statement to NBC Connecticut:

    "These settlements stem from election administration issues in 2014 and 2015, and it was my office’s judgment that the cases should be resolved. Hartford’s current Registrars of Voters have attended State-mandated training and certification as part of Connecticut’s broader efforts to improve election administration."



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    A Bay Area woman is desperate to find her husband who went missing after a van plowed through the crowds in central Barcelona, killing at least 14 people —one from the United States — and injuring more than 100 others.

    Heidi Nunes said she and her husband, Jared Tucker, were in Europe celebrating their first wedding anniversary, visiting Paris and Venice before arriving at the Catalan city. 

    The couple, from Walnut Creek, California, was walking in Barcelona's Las Ramblas shopping district when Nunes decided to look at some jewelry while Tucker went to use the bathroom. 

    Moments later, a van veered onto the promenade and barreled down the busy walkway in central Barcelona on Thursday, swerving back and forth as it mowed down pedestrians and turned a picturesque tourist destination into a bloody killing zone.

    "Next thing I know there’s screaming, yelling," Nunes told NBC News. "I got pushed inside the souvenir kiosk and stayed there hiding while everybody kept running by screaming, and then the police eventually made us evacuate."

    Nunes said she has not seen or heard from Tucker, a 34-year-old construction worker, since the deadly attack. She told NBC News that she's aware of a picture circulating online appearing to show her husband looking injured and being helped by a stranger. 

    A picture taken moments shortly the attack depicts a happy couple enjoying sangrias on the promenade. Nunes said the clothes he was wearing in that photo "is what he’s wearing now," and hopes that detail provides a clue and helps someone to recognize him.  

    She said she has reached out to the U.S. embassy in Spain for help and has called local hospitals searching for him.

    "We’re waiting for a list at the emergency places we’re at but the lists don’t seem to be updated very rapidly," she told NBC News. "So we were going to start driving to hospitals to start looking."

    One American was killed in the attack, while another sustained minor injuries, a State Department official told NBC News Friday. Neither was identified, and Spanish authorities say several casualties have yet to be identified.

    A biographical page for Nunes on the El Sobrante Christian School website says the sixth-grade teacher grew up in Sacramento and "enjoys spending time with her son and attending his soccer and lacrosse games."  

    San Jose resident Caroline Bet Adam, who is also in Spain on vacation, told NBC Bay Area she got off a bus moments after the attack and saw people screaming and running. Her family is shaken but safe.

    Another Bay Area resident, Isaura Ochoa, is studying abroad in Europe and was just blocks away from the deadly scene.

    "Everything seemed out of control," Ochoa said. "All of a sudden people started running in opposite directions of where everything was -- everyone ran into a store."

    Early Friday morning, five people carrying fake bomb belts were killed in a shootout with police in Cambrils, a seaside resort town about 80 miles from Barcelona. Six people, including an officer, were injured in the attack. The government for Spain's Catalonia region said the back-to-back vehicle attacks were connected and the work of a large terrorist group.

    Four people have been arrested, but the driver of the van in the Barcelona attack fled on foot and remained at large Friday morning.

    The Associated Press contributed to this report.



    Photo Credit: Heidi Nunes

    Heidi Nunes and Jared TuckerHeidi Nunes and Jared Tucker

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    Violent police encounters in California last year led to the deaths of 157 people and six officers, the state attorney general's office said Thursday in a report that provides the first statewide tally on police use-of-force incidents.

    All of the state's 800 police departments supplied detailed data from 2016, including demographic information on the civilians and officers, the type of call that led to the violence and the officers' justification for using force.

    The departments reported 782 incidents resulting in serious injury or death, or where a firearm was discharged. Those cases involved 832 civilians and about 19 percent, or 157, of those people were killed.

    Forty-two percent of civilians who were involved in the incidents were Hispanic, 30 percent white and 20 percent black. More than 50 percent of the officers involved were white, according to the report.

    The times officers used force represent a tiny fraction of the millions of police encounters in the state of nearly 40 million people.

    "In California, we strive to improve public trust between law enforcement agencies and the communities they are sworn to protect by opening lines of communication," Attorney General Xavier Becerra said in a statement. "A necessary part of the discussion is knowing the facts and having the data to inform the creation of effective plans to advance sound criminal justice policies."

    Departments are now required to report any use of force that causes "serious injuries" under a proposal passed by lawmakers and implemented by former Attorney General Kamala Harris. Though some departments already tracked such data on their own, many did not.

    Few other states collect such comprehensive data. Texas requires the attorney general to track statistics on officer-caused and officer-sustained injuries and death, Colorado requires every police shooting be reported and Connecticut tracks every incident of serious force, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.


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    A pedestrian was struck and killed in Stamford Thursday night and police are trying to identify the man who died. 

    The man was struck by a 2008 Toyota Prius on High Ridge Road, or Route 137, just before 11:30 p.m., according to police.  

    Police said the man, who appears to be 60 to 70 years old, was crossing High Ridge Road from west to east, near Olga Drive and the Burger King restaurant. He was not in the crosswalk at the time. 

    The man was pronounced dead at the scene and police are trying to figure out who he is because he was not carrying any identification.

    He is 5-feet-4 to 5-feet-7, weighs approximately 140 pounds, and has medium-length gray hair and a receding hair line. 

    He was wearing a blue button-down short-sleeve shirt over a brown button-down shirt, red pants, and gray-and-blue Asics sneakers. 

    He was also wearing a Timex watch with a white face on his left wrist and a blue latex glove on his right hand. 

    The driver, a 65-year-old Stamford resident, remained at the scene and is cooperating with the investigation. 

    Anyone with information should call the Collision Analysis and Reconstruction Squad at 203-977-4712. 



    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

    Stamford PoliceStamford Police

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    State Police are investigating a burglary at a Citgo gas station at 2 School Street in East Granby. 

    Police said the burglary was reported at 5:30 a.m. 

    No additional information was available.



    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

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    The Center City statue of Frank Rizzo, Philadelphia's polarizing former police commissioner and mayor, was defaced late Thursday with the words "Black Power" written in white spray paint.

    The vandal also wrote "The Black community should be their own police" on the steps of the Municipal Services Building on John F. Kennedy Boulevard where the statue stands.

    Vandalism of the bronze statue follows renewed calls for its removal in the wake of the deadly violence at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, and national discussion over how to handle statues and monuments linked to racism and other emotionally charged issues. 

    A Rizzo supporter covered the vandalized midsection of the statue with a sheet overnight. City crews later used soap and brooms to clean up the graffiti and by daybreak the words were gone from the statue of a waving Rizzo at its prominent location across from City Hall.

    Philadelphia police took the suspected vandal, who investigators say drove off in a Toyota station wagon, into custody before 7 a.m. It is unclear what charges he could face.

    The latest act of vandalism came after protesters clashed with police near the statue and a man from Maplewood, New Jersey, was arrested after cameras allegedly captured him throwing eggs at the statue. And, on Friday morning a mohawked man placed trash at Rizzo's feet.

    The bronze statue, unveiled in the late 1990s, depicts Rizzo bounding down the steps of the Municipal Services Building. It was donated to the city.

    Driven by Philadelphia Councilwoman Helen Gym, there is growing support for removing the tribute to Rizzo, who died of a heart attack in 1991. Some call it a reminder of Rizzo's “racist relationship towards Philadelphia’s African-American community" in the late 1960s and 1970s. 

    The first-term Democrat tweeted that “all around the country, we're fighting to remove the monuments to slavery & racism. Philly, we have work to do. Take the Rizzo statue down.”

    Mayor Jim Kenney hasn't rejected the idea.

    "If there's a group of people or folks in the city who want to reconsider the placement of the statue, whether it be removed or relocated, that's up to them to go through the same process as the people who erected it," Kenney said.

    It's not the first time activists have demanded the statue be removed. Last year, an anti-police brutality group called Philly Coalition for Real Justice petitioned for its removal.

    Rizzo, a hard-charging, big-mouthed icon of head-cracking law enforcement in Philadelphia, served as police commissioner for four years before serving two terms as the city’s mayor from 1972 to 1980. His friends, family and fans remember him as a devoted public servant unafraid to speak his mind. Thousands of people signed a recent online petition to keep the statue in place.

    Rizzo's detractors saw his police force as corrupt and brutal.

    Lowlights from his time as police commissioner include an incident in 1970 of officers raiding the Philadelphia headquarters of the Black Panthers and forcing the men to strip in public.

    For those who knew and covered him, like former cop and retired Inquirer reporter Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. and NBC News correspondent Andrea Mitchell, Rizzo can't be easily compared to other politicians. And Rizzo doesn't belong in the same category as long-gone Confederate leaders whose statues are coming down across the country.

    Gibbons remembers Rizzo fondly for his tough policing, describing the 6 feet, 2 inch Italian American from South Philly as the guy who “when he entered a room, everything else stopped.”

    “He is not by any means Robert E. Lee, or Chief Justice Roger Taney, who wrote the Dred Scott decision," said Mitchell, who began her career as a radio and television reporter for KYW during much of the Rizzo years. "He was a twice-elected mayor of Philadelphia, who was clearly controversial in his years as police commissioner. But from a distance, I would say he is not analogous to those Confederate leaders who tried to overthrow the government.”

    When Rizzo said in 1978 that he wouldn't seek a third term in office he vowed to "defend the rights" of whites who had been "kicked around too long," The Washington Post reported

    But Mitchell said that, “For all of this flaws, Rizzo never publicly defended white separatists."



    Photo Credit: NBC10 Brandon Hudson

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    A dog was abandoned in East Windsor and police are trying to find him a forever home.

    Reagan, an American Bully mix, was abandoned with only a bowl of food and water, according to a post on the East Windsor Police Facebook page. 

    He will need an owner who can responsibly care for him and anyone interested in meeting him can set up an appointment to meet him.

    “He is too darn happy to waste away in our shelter,” police said in a Facebook post.

    East Windsor is waiving the adoption fee for Reagan.

    Several animals are looking for forever homes. If you are looking to expand your family with a pet, come to the third annual Clear the Shelters event on Saturday.

    Click here for a list of Clear the Shelters Locations in Connecticut. 

    Hundreds of shelters across the country are teaming up with NBC Owned Television Stations and Telemundo for the nationwide pet adoption drive on Saturday to help find loving homes for animals in need.

    Almost 54,000 pets found their forever homes in 2016.



    Photo Credit: East Windsor Police
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    Four Connecticut swimming areas are closed after water tests revealed high bacteria levels or blue-green algae, according to the state Department of Energy and Environmental Protection.

    The swimming area at Indian Wells State Park in Shelton is closed because of bacteria levels and the water there will be retested on Aug. 23.

    The swimming areas at Silver Sands State Park in Milford and Lake Waramaug State Park in Kent are closed because of bacteria levels. The water at both parks will be retested Monday.

    The swimming area at Kettletown State Park in Southbury is closed because of the presence of blue-green algae blooms and it will remain closed until that condition subsides.



    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

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    Gov. Dannel Malloy has announced changes in state funding for education in the absence of a state budget, which will result in less funding for 54 school districts and no Education Cost Sharing Funding for 85 towns. 

    The plan prioritizes funding to the 30 most vulnerable school districts. 

    It also restores $40 million to non-profits so they can "provide vital services for our most vulnerable residents."

    [[441006273,C]]

    "The municipal aid that is funded as part of this executive order reflects the nearly impossible decisions Connecticut is forced to make in the absence of a budget," Malloy said. "In turn, it will force some of our municipalities, both large and small, to make similar difficult choices of their own."   

    The governor called on state lawmakers to come together to come to an agreement on a budget.

    “The deep cuts in state aid called for today by the Governor would have a severe impact on towns – but they are not unexpected,” Joe DeLong, executive director of the Connecticut Conference of Municipalities, said in a statement. “Local governments would not be in this position if the General Assembly had done their job earlier and put forth a state budget that protected the interests of cities and towns and their property taxpayers.”



    Photo Credit: Shutterstock / maroke

    File photoFile photo

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    A plan to farm scallops and oysters on the Niantic River met strong opposition from residents at a community meeting for the Waterford East Lyme Shellfish Commission Thursday. The plan would give the Niantic Bay Shellfish Farm 6.4 acres of the Niantic River for farming.

    Opponents are concerned that the public will no longer be able to enjoy the river once farming begins.

    “I like to swim in the river and I’d like to continue to swim in the river. I’m afraid that won’t happen if this proposal is passed,” Frances Violante said.

    Other Waterford residents are worried that shellfish farming will negatively impact the health and appearance of the Niantic River.

    “We’re working hard to help save the river and save the hills,” Robert Dutton said. “I don’t think this is going to help save the river.”

    The plan has already received the commission’s approval, but still needs the authorization of the U.S. Amy Corps of Engineers to install the needed infrastructure for the farm.

    Opponents are asking the engineers to take a second look at the plan to delay the farm’s opening.

    Timothy Londregan III, the owner of the Niantic Bay Shellfish Farm, believes opponents concerns are unwarranted.

    “It’s doing a good that we really need, “Londregan said, “Shellfish aquaculture is a net positive for communities and the environment.”

    Residents will have until next Saturday to submit their concerns in writing to the Army Corps of Engineers.





    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

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    Three girls, all younger than 10, were found slain Friday morning inside a home in Clinton, Maryland, police say.

    An adult family member arrived at the home Friday morning and found the children dead in the house, located on the 6400 block of Brooke Jane Drive, Prince George's County police said. 

    "We are now in the midst of a major investigation into what happened to these children and who killed them," police department spokeswoman Jennifer Donelan said.

    "We have not determined who the person responsible is yet," she said.

    Police stressed at an afternoon press conference that they believed the incident was confined to that home and that there was not a danger to the larger community.

    Police said they were called to the house shortly after 7:35 a.m. They were met by people who they called "members of the family."

    Inside the home, they found the girls with "trauma to the body," Donelan said at the press conference.

    They were pronounced dead at the scene. 

    Police said they couldn't confirm if the girls are related or how they knew each other. Citing the ongoing investigation, they also wouldn't say what had happened to the family members at the scene that morning.

    More family members of the victims are being contacted. "We believe we have made contact with a parent," Deputy Chief Sammy Patel said.

    The scene was heartbreaking to police; counseling services are being offered to those who responded to the home.

    State's Attorney Angela Alsobrooks said Prince George's County had woken to ""yet another nightmare."

    "We are so very, very devastated for these young, beautiful children and their families," Alsobrooks said.

    Stay with News4 for more details on this developing story.



    Photo Credit: Prince George's County Police Department

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    A dog attacked an animal control officer at the Mansfield animal shelter on Friday morning and the officer has serious injuries.

    Town officials said the animal control officer has been taken to Hartford Hospital and the injuries are not life-threatening.

    Mansfield Fire Chief Fran Raiola previously said officers and firefighters responded to the shelter at 230 Clover Road for a person suffering from multiple dog bites.

    Two dogs have been quarantined after the attack, according to Raiola.

    The animal shelter will be closed Friday and an adoption scheduled for Sunday had been canceled.

    State police are investigating.





    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

    A person was attacked by a dog at the Mansfield Animal Control shelter on Friday.A person was attacked by a dog at the Mansfield Animal Control shelter on Friday.

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    A Middletown mother has been arrested after police officers found her children living in deplorable conditions and eating dog food off the floor, according to police.

    Police officers responded to an undisclosed location just before 2 p.m. Thursday after the fire marshal spotted trash blocking a third-floor apartment.

    Middletown firefighters had responded to the home because a cigarette thrown from a third-floor window set an air conditioner on fire and fire officials needed to speak with the people in the third-floor apartment, police said.

    When officers went to the apartment, 27-year-old Chloe Edwards, of Middletown, answered the door and the officers were “taken back” by the smell coming from the residence, police said.

    Five children were in the apartment, which police said was uncomfortably warm. Officers noted that there were several flies in the apartment and the carpet was stained with food, urine, cockroach carcasses and feces.

    In the kitchen, flies and cockroaches covered dishes that filled the sink, according to police, and the only food in the refrigerator included two jars of sauce, a can of pasta and two small jars of baby food, the arraignment report states.

    Two bedrooms were in deplorable condition, according to police.

    One had three beds with broken frames and no pillows, blankets or sheets. Police said the mattresses were stained with dog vomit, feces and some sorts of liquids. Police also saw cigarette butts beer cans and dry spaghetti.

    The bed in another bedroom was also missing sheets, pillows and blankets and a folding knife was on the floor. Police said white paint was strewn about and there were exposed nails on wooden boards.

    When officers opened the back door to the back landing of the apartment, they found a three- to four-foot high pile of trash and, near the front entryway, police saw an electrical socket without a cover and exposed wires, police said.

    Police called the state Department of Children and Families. While waiting for DCF, two of the children said they were hungry and ate dry dog food they found on the floor. Four of the children were transported to DCF, police said.

    The other juvenile was not Edwards’s child, police said. Edwards knew her through a “third party” and the child’s mother had reported her missing, police said

    The city of Middletown Health Department declared the apartment “unfit for occupancy.”

    Edwards was charged with five counts of risk of injury to a minor and is being held on $10,000 bond.




    Photo Credit: Middletown Police

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    A 47-year-old Tolland woman is accused of driving under the influence and going the wrong way on Route 9 in Middletown early Friday morning. 

    Police said troopers responded to the report of a wrong-way driver around 2:20 a.m. and saw a gray 2002 Honda CRV going north in the southbound lanes, so a trooper positioned his state police cruiser in front of it to stop the woman, but 47-year-old Jennifer West, of Tolland, swerved around the cruiser and kept going the wrong way on the ramp toward Interstate-91, police said. 

    State police forced the Honda to stop on the I-91 south exit 22 ramp in Cromwell and determined West was under the influence of alcohol and, or drugs, police said. 

    West was charged with reckless driving, disobeying the signal of an officer, driving the wrong way on a divided highway, reckless endangerment in the second degree and operating under the influence of alcohol and/or drugs. 

    She was released after posting $2,500 bond and scheduled to appear at Middletown Superior Court on Sept. 21. 

    In the event you see a driver going the wrong way, state police urge people to slow down and safely move to the right or to the shoulder. If there is no shoulder, move as far to the right as possible. 

    If you can avoid it, do not slam on your brakes, especially if there is a vehicle directly behind you, and don’t swerve off the road or into other lanes. 

    To alert the other driver, honk the horn, flash your headlights and turn on the hazard lights. It's possible that you might be able to make the wrong-way driver aware that they are traveling in the wrong direction. 

    As soon as it is safe to do so, call 911, report the wrong-way driver and give your location, including direction of travel and closest exit. If you are able, provide a description of the vehicle. 

    Never turn around and follow a wrong-way driver, state police warn. 

    It's good practice when driving on the highway at night, especially after midnight, to travel in the right lane. Wrong-way drivers often travel in the left lane thinking they are in the right lane for their direction of travel. 

    Police note that some wrong-way drivers are impaired, but others might be experiencing a medical emergency or have become disoriented or confused by signage.  



    Photo Credit: Connecticut State Police

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    Three men assaulted another man on the dance floor at Los Imperios in West Hartford and police are asking anyone with information about the attack to come forward.

    Police said security from the bar called police at 12:02 a.m. Friday and said a man had been assaulted and was unconscious in the bar area.

    Officers who responded found a man without a shirt bleeding from the head. He came to and West Hartford Fire Department Medics treated him, but he refused further treatment.

    The victim was uncooperative, but a witness told police three men attacked the man on the dance floor.

    Security staff did not see the assault and did not detain anyone, police said.

    One attacker might have had dreadlocks and was wearing a dark red zip-up jacket. Another wore a dark hoodie, police said.

    Police ask anyone with information about the assault or who has video or photos to call Detective Robert Magao in the special investigations division at 860-570-8841.

    Police said they also received several complaints from neighbors about patrons leaving and motorcycles racing up and down the street.

    In addition to the two officers assigned to be outside of the business, four additional police cruisers and a supervisor were sent into the area.

    In July, police revoked Los Imperios entertainment license after a series of violations and suspensions.





    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

    File photoFile photo

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    Steve Bannon has departed the White House, where he was President Donald Trump’s chief strategist. His tenure lasted seven months. White House chief of staff John Kelly and Bannon mutually agreed that Friday would be Bannon’s last day, according to a statement from the press secretary that said they were “grateful for his service.”


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    What began as a vacation to celebrate a Bay Area couple's first wedding anniversary ended in tragedy, Jared Tucker’s family said, when the 42-year-old was killed in Thursday’s terror attack in Barcelona.

    Tucker's father, Dan Tucker, who lives in Martinez, told NBC Bay Area on Friday that his daughter-in-law, Heidi Nunes, has identified her husband's remains at a Spanish morgue. 

    The Walnut Creek couple visited Paris and Venice before arriving in Barcelona, Nunes said Thursday. They were walking in the Catalan city's Las Ramblas shopping district when Nunes decided to look at some jewelry while Tucker went to use the bathroom. 

    Moments later, a van veered onto the promenade and barreled down the busy walkway in the city center Thursday, swerving back and forth as it mowed down pedestrians and turned a picturesque tourist destination into a bloody killing zone. Thirteen people were killed, along with another person in a separate attack hours later in Catalonia.

    "Next thing I know there’s screaming, yelling," Nunes told NBC News. "I got pushed inside the souvenir kiosk and stayed there hiding while everybody kept running by screaming, and then the police eventually made us evacuate."

    Nunes had said she hadn't seen or heard from Tucker, a construction worker, since the deadly attack. She told NBC News Thursday that she was aware of a picture circulating online appearing to show her husband looking injured and being helped by a stranger. 

    Dan Tucker said he and his son, one of five children, own a swimming pool construction business together. Jared Tucker, has three teenage daughters from previous relationships, was visiting Europe for the first time and was due to return to the United States on Friday, his father said.

    A State Department official told NBC News Friday morning that one American was killed and another was missing. The State Department have not confirmed Tucker is the American who died.

    Spanish police intensified their manhunt for an unknown number of suspects still on the loose Friday. They shot and killed five people early Friday who were wearing fake bomb belts as they attacked the seaside resort of Cambrils with a speeding car. Police also arrested four others believed linked to the Cambrils attack and the carnage Thursday on the famous Barcelona promenade.

    The Associated Press contributed to this report.



    Photo Credit: Heidi Nunes

    Heidi Nunes and Jared TuckerHeidi Nunes and Jared Tucker

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    A Vernon man is accused of stealing from a grieving family when he went to their home with someone who went to provide comfort after the loss of a family member. 

    Police said they received several calls just before 8 p.m. Thursday about a disturbance on Loveland Hill Road, in front of Rockville High School, and found 44-year-old Miguel Estrada was being held down inside a car. 

    Officers learned that Estrada has been at a home on Hartyl Drive in Vernon earlier in the evening with a friend who had gone to the house to comfort the family whose close family member who died earlier that morning. 

    Police said Estrada didn’t know the grieving family.

    While he was inside the home, Estrada allegedly went into one of the bedrooms and stole a change container.

    The homeowner caught him and told to leave, then later found a purse discarded in a bathroom and noticed credit cards and cash were missing, police said. 

    The victim and family members then went to Estrada’s home and were waiting down the street for police to arrive when they saw Estrada in a vehicle, confronted him and restrained him until police arrived.

    Estrada was uncooperative and tried to walk away from officers, according to police. He was taken into custody after a briefly struggle and had credit cards that belonged to the victim, pills and tablets police believe to be ecstasy. 

    Estrada was arrested and charged with possession of narcotics, sixth-degree larceny, interfering with police and interfering/resisting police. 

    He was held overnight on a $20,000.00 bond and will appear in Rockville Court today. 

    Cameron Melton, 29, of Vernon, was driving the car Estrada was and police said he had an extraditable warrant from New Hampshire for violation of probation and was charged as a fugitive from justice.





    Photo Credit: Vernon Police

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