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    One person was killed in a crash caused by a wrong way drive on Interstate 91 in Wallingford Sunday. 

    Emergency crews responded to the crash around 2:45 p.m., according to Connecticut State Police.

    Police said the accident was on I-91 south near exit 15 and caused lane closures for hours in the area. 

    All lanes re-opened around 7 p.m. Sunday. 



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

    Life-threatening injuries were reported after a wrong-way crash on I-91 southbound in Wallingford Sunday.Life-threatening injuries were reported after a wrong-way crash on I-91 southbound in Wallingford Sunday.

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    Advocates for both survivors of campus sexual assault and the accused are bracing for a decision from Education Secretary Betsy DeVos, who is currently considering changes to Obama-era directives for how schools deal with such allegations under the federal law known as Title IX, NBC News reported.

    DeVos has indicated that she intends to reexamine Title IX enforcement and sexual assault guidance for schools, holding three 90-minute listening sessions with advocates for survivors, representatives of the falsely accused and higher education officials in July.

    Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is a federal statute intended to protect people from sex discrimination in education programs or other activities that receive federal financial assistance.

    Some advocates said they hope DeVos will leave the existing guidance in place and continue to work with schools to do more to prevent sexual violence and help student victims.




    Photo Credit: Alex Brandon/AP (File)

    FILE - Education Secretary Betsy DeVos pauses while speaking with the media after a series of listening sessions about campus sexual violence, July 13, 2017, in Washington.FILE - Education Secretary Betsy DeVos pauses while speaking with the media after a series of listening sessions about campus sexual violence, July 13, 2017, in Washington.

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    Britain's Prince William and his wife, Duchess Catherine, are expecting their third child, Kensington Palace announced early Monday.

    The royal couple is "very pleased" to make the announcement, the Palace's statement read on Twitter.

    "The Queen and members of both families are delighted with the news," the statement continued.

    The Duchess is suffering from hyperemesis gravidarum, a condition of severe morning sickness during pregnancy, according to the Palace, which added that a planned event for her today was canceled. Kate, who suffered from the condition with her first two pregnancies as well, is being cared for at Kensington.

    The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge have two other children together. Prince George was born in 2013, and Princess Charlotte was born in 2015.

    William and Kate were married in April 2011.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    BERLIN, GERMANY - JULY 19: Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge with Prince George of Cambridge and Princess Charlotte of Cambridge as they arrive at Berlin Tegel Airport during an official visit to Poland and Germany on July 19, 2017 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Ian Vogler - Pool/Getty Images)BERLIN, GERMANY - JULY 19: Prince William, Duke of Cambridge, Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge with Prince George of Cambridge and Princess Charlotte of Cambridge as they arrive at Berlin Tegel Airport during an official visit to Poland and Germany on July 19, 2017 in Berlin, Germany. (Photo by Ian Vogler - Pool/Getty Images)

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    The wait for a decision on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program may be over.

    President Donald Trump is expected to end the program that protects undocumented children who were brought to the US, according to several media reports. The decision would come with a six-month delay to give Congress time to act on possible new legislation to address the plight of those young people, according to the Associated Press, but it's not clear what would happen to those who currently hold work permits under the program during that period.

    And while the deal isn’t done, the reaction is already pouring in.

    Connecticut leaders spoke out about the president’s expected decision.

    Sen. Chris Murphy (D) and Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D) are both vocal supporters of DACA and tweeted their displeasure at the expected decision.


    These young immigrants are known as dreamers – they were brought into the country illegally by their parents or guardians. Many have grown up in the US, work in the US, and have no memory of the countries they were born in

    As of July 2015, the program protects about 790,000 young immigrants from deportation.

    "Having that extra burden of having your future toyed with and argued around like it's just some sort of political move, um … it's disheartening. And I wish the president would come down and I wish other people would come down and really check our hearts to see that we're not here to do anything but work and give back to the community," said Jesus Contreras, who works as a paramedic in Texas.

    The Obama administration created the DACA program in 2012 as a stopgap way to protect some young immigrants from deportation as it continued to push for a broader immigration overhaul in Congress.

    Even some Republicans are urging President Trump to wait on the decision, which is expected Monday.



    Photo Credit: AP
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    FILE- In this Aug. 15, 2017, file photo, a woman holds up a signs in support of the Obama administration program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, during an immigration reform rally at the White House in Washington. After months of delays, President Donald Trump is expected to decide soon on the fate of so called “dreamers” who were brought into the country illegally as children as he faces a looming court deadline and is digging in on appeals to his base. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)FILE- In this Aug. 15, 2017, file photo, a woman holds up a signs in support of the Obama administration program known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, during an immigration reform rally at the White House in Washington. After months of delays, President Donald Trump is expected to decide soon on the fate of so called “dreamers” who were brought into the country illegally as children as he faces a looming court deadline and is digging in on appeals to his base. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

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    The Utah nurse who was arrested after refusing to draw blood from an unconscious patient says she has been overwhelmed by the support, and feels a "sense of urgency" when it comes to mending police relationships with the public and overall medical community.

    "I think this resonates with people all over and that’s a problem," Alex Wubbels, a nurse at University Hospital in Salt Lake City, said in an interview on the "Today" show Monday. "We have to fix this with effective communication and better dialogue between our two agencies."

    The July 26 incident captured on police body-camera video showed Salt Lake City Detective Jeff Payne dragging nurse Wubbels from the hospital and handcuffing her after she refused to allow blood to be drawn from an unconscious patient after a car-crash.

    Wubbels said Monday that she released the video, which has sparked outrage since it was made public last week, because there "needed to be accountability." She noted that her early conversations with Salt Lake Police Department were effective and they "wanted to walk down a path of positive change."

    "But I did not have that same response from the University police and the University security, so it was sort of trigger to say 'this is what you need to see, so I'll show you,'" Wubbels said.

    Since then, a criminal and internal affairs investigation was launched, prompting the police department to put Payne and another officer on paid administrative leave.

    The second officer hasn't been formally identified, but officials have said they also were reviewing the conduct of Payne's boss, a lieutenant who reportedly called for the arrest if Wubbels kept interfering.

    Wubbels said she doesn't know whether any actions would have been taken by the department had the video not been released, but she hopes this incident leads to a change in policies and procedures by the agency. 

    "I feel a sense of urgency for this conversation. We need to make this better. This can’t be happening, it shouldn’t be happening and if I have anything to say about it, it won’t happen again," Wubbels said. "I’m not here to police the police. The police need to do that if they want to regain any kind of trust by me and, I think, the public."

    In the video footage, Wubbels calmly explains to Payne that she couldn't draw blood on a badly injured patient who wasn't conscious, citing a recent change in law. A 2016 U.S. Supreme Court ruling affirmed that a blood sample cannot be taken without patient consent or a warrant.

    The dispute ended with Payne saying, "We're done, you're under arrest," and physically moving Wubbels outside while she screamed and said, "I've done nothing wrong!"

    The patient, who was not suspected of criminal wrongdoing, was a truck driver who had been burned in a head-on crash with a car that was fleeing police. An Idaho police department identified the driver as William Gray, a reserve officer in the city of Rigby, and hailed Wubbles as hero for standing up to Payne.    

    "The Rigby Police Department would like to thank the nurse involved and hospital staff for standing firm, and protecting Officer Gray’s rights as a patient and victim," the department wrote in a Facebook post. "Protecting the rights of others is truly a heroic act."

    The Salt Lake Police Department said the frustrated Payne had called his supervisor before the arrest and that several people went back and forth about the time-sensitive blood draw.

    Police spokeswoman Christina Judd acknowledged that the officer's frustration is "not an excuse."

    "It definitely doesn't forgive what happened," she said.

    In a joint statement released late Friday afternoon, Salt Lake City Police Chief Mike Brown and Mayor Jackie Biskupski announced that Payne has been placed on full administrative leave as the Unified Police Department is planning to launch a criminal investigation into the incident.

    "We cannot allow an incident like this [to] divide our community or taint the good work of SLCPD," Biskupski said in the statement. "When I learned of this unacceptable incident last night, I was outraged and will ensure it is fully and independently investigated so our community can heal."

    After taking the nurse into custody, the detective left Wubbels handcuffed and waiting in a hot police car for 20 minutes before realizing that blood had actually already been drawn as part of treatment, said her lawyer, Karra Porter. 

    "This has upended her worldview in a way. She just couldn't believe this could happen," Porter said.

    Porter, who joined Wubbles Monday on the "Today" show, said they have not ruled out a lawsuit. "Nothing is off the table," she said.

    Wubbels, a former Olympian who competed in Alpine skiing in the Winter Olympics in 1998 and 2002 under her maiden name Shaffer, was not charged, The Salt Lake Tribune reported.

    "It hurts to relive it," she told the newspaper of rewatching the footage of her arrest.

    Wubbels said she thinks the video of her arrest, released amid an ongoing national conversation about police use of force, indicates that bullying can take many forms and can happen anywhere, not just in schools or on social media.

    "This cop bullied me. He bullied me to the utmost extreme," she told The Associated Press Friday. "And nobody stood in his way."

    She said she acted as any good nurse would, following her training and protocols to protect the rights of a patient who couldn't speak for himself.

    "You can't just take blood if you don't have a legitimate concern for something to be tested," Wubbels said. "It is the most personal property I think that we can have, besides our skin and bones and organs."

    Wubbels' attorney said Payne had argued he was allowed to take the patient's blood because of "implied consent," though law on that issue was changed years ago.

    Payne is among a group of officers who are certified phlebotomists, called upon regularly when a blood sample is required for a police investigation.

    Messages for the Salt Lake Police Association union were not immediately returned. Payne could not be reached for comment.

    There is a possibility the released footage was edited from the original raw video, though no involved parties have indicated that as a concern.

    In response to the incident, police spokeswoman Judd said the department has since updated its blood draw policy to mirror what the hospital staff uses. She said officers have already received additional training but that they are still sorting out the department's response since the law changed.

    "We want to know where something went wrong, what we didn't know, and why we didn't know it," Judd said.

    The agency has met with hospital administration to ensure it does not happen again and to repair their relationship.

    "There's a strong bond between fire, police and nurses because they all work together to help save lives, and this caused an unfortunate rift that we are hoping to repair immediately," Judd said.

    The hospital said it's proud of the way Wubbels handled the situation. The nurse's union National Nurses United called the arrest an outrageous act of violence.

    The Tribune reports the patient was a reserve police officer from Idaho who was working his other job as a semi-truck driver when a car fleeing the Utah Highway Patrol crashed into him. Information on the patient's condition wasn't immediately available.



    Photo Credit: AP Photo/Rick Bowmer
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    Nurse Alex Wubbels, right, looks on during an interview while her attorney Karra Porter looks on, Friday, Sept. 1, 2017, in Salt Lake City. Wubbels followed hospital policy and advice from her bosses when she told Salt Lake City police Detective Jeff Payne that he could not get a blood sample without a warrant or consent from the patient, according to Porter. The police department is making changes after Payne dragged a screaming Wubbels out of the hospital in handcuffs when she refused to allow blood to be drawn from the unconscious patient.Nurse Alex Wubbels, right, looks on during an interview while her attorney Karra Porter looks on, Friday, Sept. 1, 2017, in Salt Lake City. Wubbels followed hospital policy and advice from her bosses when she told Salt Lake City police Detective Jeff Payne that he could not get a blood sample without a warrant or consent from the patient, according to Porter. The police department is making changes after Payne dragged a screaming Wubbels out of the hospital in handcuffs when she refused to allow blood to be drawn from the unconscious patient.

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    A New York City man has been charged with forgery after he allegedly tried to use to counterfeit bills to make purchases at a Hamden Kohl’s store, according to Hamden police.

    Police said that 38-year-old James Oliver was found in possession of 10 counterfeit $100 bills when officers responded to the store at 2380 Dixwell Avenue on Aug. 29.

    Oliver was arrested and charged with first-degree forgery and second-degree forgery. He was issued a $100,000 bond and is due in court on Sept. 12. 



    Photo Credit: Hamden Police Department

    James OliverJames Oliver

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    The “Fight for 15” took to the streets across the country and across Connecticut this Labor Day. Rallies were planned in hundreds of cities nationwide in support of the movement to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour. Dozens of people participated in the protests in Hartford, East Hartford, Manchester, New Haven and Waterbury on Monday.

    “Hold the burgers hold the fries… make our wages supersized!” A supersized crowd of cooks, cashiers and other Connecticut fast-food workers chanted as they marched outside the McDonald’s on Albany Avenue in Hartford Monday morning.

    “We hope to get the message that $10.10 an hour is not enough and we need more and we deserve more. That and union rights,” said Richard Grimes. Grimes works at a Burger King in Hartford and joined in the Labor Day strike, hoping Connecticut legislators would take notice.

    “We need more we deserve more and that's why we are out here early this morning,” said Grimes.

    Many of the groups participating in Monday’s protests are also pushing for union rights as an economic fix. Other people said they the wage increase is simply about survival.

    “To get higher wages, it's hard where we live at, so like we need money to survive,” said Kayla Foreman, an employee at McDonald’s in Bridgeport.

    “We need this $15 to survive, this $10.10 an hour is not enough,” said Nayya Malachi, a Dunkin Donuts employee in New Haven.

    Connecticut’s minimum wage bumped up to $10.10 an hour at the beginning of 2017. While not all lawmakers are in support of a minimum wage increase, Middletown Mayor Dan Drew, who is running for Connecticut Governor, stands by the supporters.

    “They have a right to organize and they should make more money. They work hard and they deserve a living wage,” said Mayor Drew.

    NBC Connecticut reached out to the Connecticut Business and Industry Association (CBIA) and the Connecticut branch of the National Federation of Independent Businesses (NFIB) on Monday morning, to see if they had a response to the protests. However, taking into consideration that Monday is Labor Day, there was not an immediate response.

    What was clear from protesters was that the wage debate is a wager they are willing to bet on.

    “This is going to win us $15 an hour,” said Grimes. 



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

    Dozens of people participated in protests demanding a $15 minimum wage in Hartford, East Hartford, Manchester, New Haven and Waterbury on Monday.Dozens of people participated in protests demanding a $15 minimum wage in Hartford, East Hartford, Manchester, New Haven and Waterbury on Monday.

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    Six thousand runners descended on downtown New Haven for the 40th Annual Faxon Law New Haven Road Race Monday, and 10,000 spectators came out to watch the race.

    “This is the best time of the day – morning! It’s gorgeous out! People don’t realize what they miss. Look at all these people!” said Rosie-Ann Tiso of Wolcott.

    Runners competed in the kid’s race, a 5K, a half-marathon, and the prestigious 20K National Championship.


    “I’m hoping to have some fun and get some good competition. There’ll be some really fast people here today and I hope to run faster,” said Rachel Bainbridge of Arlington, Mass.

    This year’s 20K race featured five past champions, five Olympians, and several up-and-coming distance stars competing for the prize of $40,000.

    Names include America's top distance runner, Galen Rupp, U.S. Olympian, Leonard Korir, Sam Chelanga, Christo Landry and New Haven's Tim Ritchie, as well as Aliphine Tuliamuk, Emily Sisson and Jordan Hasay.

    Melissa Lee of New York said the biggest prize was bringing her fellow Yale alumni and their families together.

    “We do it every year as our Yale reunion. My kids are running the race in a couple of minutes, and then I’ll do the 20K,” Lee said.

    A portion of the money raised will go to charities across the Elm City, and some will go to Hurricane Harvey relief efforts.

    “My daughter this past weekend actually was running a lemonade stand, in Cheshire, raised $300 to go to the Hurricane Harvey victims. Awesome cause,” said Martin DiCicco of Cheshire.

    Portions of Chapel Street, Whitney Avenue, Goffe Street, and streets along East Rock Park were closed for the race.

    The race started on Elm Street and ends on Temple Street.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

    A 2014 file photo of the New Haven Road RaceA 2014 file photo of the New Haven Road Race

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    Hamden police have arrested a woman accused of using a stun gun on an innocent bystander during an argument with two other people at a nail salon.

    Police said the incident began when 19-year-old Katerah Edmundson, of Hamden got into an argument with two women at “The Nail Spa” at 1869 Dixwell Ave on Friday.

    According to police, during the argument Edmundson pulled a knife and tried to stab one of the females, but an employee was able to disarm her. Witnesses said that Edmundson then took a stun gun out and accidentally used it on a bystander while trying to reach one of the women.

    The bystander was a customer and was hit in the back.

    Edmundson was charged with third-degree assault, carrying a dangerous weapon, second-degree threatening, second-degree breach of peace, and first-degree reckless endangerment. She was issued a $5,000 bond and is due in court on Sept. 15.



    Photo Credit: Hamden Police Department

    Katerah EdmundsonKaterah Edmundson

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    The New Britain Bees are hosting a Pack the Truck event Friday to collect donations for the victims of Hurricane Harvey with some help from current Houston Astros outfielder and New Britain native George Springer.

    Springer posted a message on the New Britain Bees Youtube channel requesting donations.

    The event begins at 1 p.m. Friday at New Britain Stadium, but donations will be accepted ahead of time as well. The event will be capped off when the Bees take on the Sugar Land Skeeters from Texas in a doubleheader starting at 5:35 p.m.

    The Bees, along with partners Siracusa Moving & Storage and Premier Limousine, are looking for the following items:

    ESSENTIALS

    Blankets
    Air mattresses
    Batteries
    Flash lights
    Dog/cat food

    FOOD

    Water
    Gatorade or Powerade (liquid and powder both accepted)
    Canned goods
    Peanut butter
    Granola bars
    Crackers
    Rice
    *No glass containers

    PERSONAL HYGIENE

    Tooth brushes
    Toothpaste
    Shampoo & conditioner
    Body soap
    Deodorant
    Feminine products
    Toilet paper
    Razors

    CLOTHING (All sizes)

    Sweatshirts
    Pants
    New packages of socks and underwear

    Donations will be accepted starting Tuesday at the following locations:

    New Britain Stadium
    230 John Karbonic Way
    New Britain, CT
    Drop Off Hours: 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.

    Siracusa Moving & Storage
    250 Commerce Circle
    New Britain, CT
    Drop off hours: 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.

    Premier Limousine
    76 Fuller Way
    Berlin, CT
    Drop off hours: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m.

    For more information, visit the New Britain Bees website.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut
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    Connecticut State Police are investigating an overnight burglary at a pharmacy in Killingworth.

    Police said the crime took place at Killingworth Pharmacy, located at 183 Killingworth Road (Route 81). Detectives from the major crimes division have been called in to assist.

    Details on what was stolen were not immediately available.

    This is a developing story. Check back for updates.


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    The George R. Brown Convention Center, where people are seeking shelter from the damages wrought by Hurrican Harvey, shows signs that the aftermath goes beyond what can be listed on insurance forms, NBC News reported.

    "Need to talk?" ask signs posted along walls in the airy center that is currently home to hordes of survivors. Volunteers also walk around holding the signs, stopping to speak with people when hailed.

    Those three words are a cue to the survivors, many of whom have lost all their worldly goods, that there’s trauma to unpack after a natural disaster like Harvey. It's also a signal that there are services nearby for them.

    There may be few physical scars in such a catastrophe, but emotional wounds can run deep and create a toll on victims, according to the American Psychological Association.



    Photo Credit: Joe Raedle/Getty Images, File

    In this file photo, people take shelter at the George R. Brown Convention Center after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey inundated the city on Aug. 29, 2017, in Houston, Texas.In this file photo, people take shelter at the George R. Brown Convention Center after flood waters from Hurricane Harvey inundated the city on Aug. 29, 2017, in Houston, Texas.

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    A Jewett City woman is recovering after a brutal dog attack in Plainfield on Saturday.

    Jade Santiago, 21, was walking with her boyfriend on South Walnut Street in the Wauregan section of Plainfield when she said a dog lunged from the woods.

    "It came up from behind us, right between us, and it immediately jumped at her. And she threw her hand up and I think she saved her own life by doing that because it was going for the neck," her boyfriend Nicholas Guarneri, of Griswold, said.

    Guarneri said he kicked the dog until it ran off between two houses. The couple said they just moved to Waregan a few days ago.

    Santiago said the attack was so sudden that it’s difficult to remember all of the details.

    "Terrifying. I mean I wasn’t expecting it at all," Santiago said.

    Guarneri rushed Santiago to the local hospital where she was treated and transferred to Hartford Hospital so a specialist could take a look at her face. Her arm is in a sling and her boyfriend estimated that she has about 40 stitches.

    The couple said they did not recognize the dog and it was not wearing a collar.

    They spent part of Monday canvassing the neighborhood, trying to locate the dog and its owner. Anyone with information is asked to contact the Plainfield Police Department.

    Santiago and Guarneri said while they don’t think it’s likely, they hope the animal is found so no one else gets hurt.

    "I just hope this doesn’t happen to anybody else. I know it has, and I know it will continue to, but I want it to stop. I know there’s a lot of people who have been in the same situation as me and I know how they feel and it’s not fun. It’s scary," Santiago said.

    According to police, the breed is not clear but the dog has been described as a gray “pit bull type dog” with a white spot of fur on its front paw.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    A woman was killed in an apparent domestic attack that happened in Hartford on Sunday night.

    Police responded to May Street at 7:31 p.m. for a report that said a woman was screaming.

    Upon arriving, officers found an unconscious woman suffering from an apparent assault, Hartford police said. 

    EMS transported the victim to St. Francis Hospital where she was pronounced dead at 4:06 a.m. on Monday. 

    The investigation is ongoing. While police are investigating the death as a homicide, the Office of Chief Medical Examiner (OCME) has not yet performed an autopsy. 

    No other details were immediately available. 



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    A man’s body was found on the side of the road on Pearl Street in Enfield Monday morning, and police say the death appears suspicious.

    Enfield police said the man was found on the sidewalk on Pearl Street near Route 190 between 5 and 6 a.m. He has been identified as 33-year-old Ronald Sweet of Enfield.

    Enfield police said as of Monday afternoon they were treating the death as drug related, but were awaiting an official cause of death from the medical examiner.

    The State Police Major Crimes Unit has been called in for assistance.

    No other information was immediately available.

    This is a developing story. Check back for updates.




    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut/Contributed Photo

    Police are investigating the suspicious death of a man whose body was found on the side of the road in Enfield Monday morning. The victim has been identified as 33-year old Ronald SweetPolice are investigating the suspicious death of a man whose body was found on the side of the road in Enfield Monday morning. The victim has been identified as 33-year old Ronald Sweet

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    NBC Connecticut Meteorologists have issued a First Alert ahead of thunderstorms and heavy rain Tuesday evening.

    Some of the thunderstorms could be strong to even severe. Any storm that does form could contain heavy rain, frequent lightning, gusty winds, and small hail.

    The First Alert is in effect for areas of western Connecticut where conditions are more favorable for thunderstorms and heavy rain.


    Take a look at First Alert Future Radar which shows showers and thunderstorms moving into the state between 7 and 9 p.m.



    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

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    LifeStar responded to an accident on Route 66 in Portland on Monday night.

    No other details were immediately available. 



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    A motorcyclist is dead after being struck by a car in Hamden on Monday afternoon.

    Hamden police responded to a motor vehicle accident with injuries at the intersection of Mix Avenue and East Gate Late at approximately 4 p.m.

    A preliminary investigation found that a 70-year-old Hamden woman traveling northbound on Mix Avenue made a left turn and hit the motorcycle.

    A 38-year-old New Haven man operating the motorcycle was pronounced dead by paramedics. His body was transported to the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner (OCME) in Farmington.

    The identity of the victim has not been revealed. 

    It is not clear if any charges will be filed. 

    The Hamden Police Department Traffic Division is conducting the investigation. Anyone with information is asked to contact Officer Gregg Curran at (203) 230-4036.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    Twenty dogs were welcomed to Connecticut from Texas in order to clear up some shelter space for other animals displaced by Hurricane Harvey. 

    On Monday, the CT Humane Society in Newington received 20 dogs from their shelter partner, the Houston SPCA, in Galvenston, Texas.

    "These were dogs that are already homeless or surrendered to a shelter for adoption," Barbara Naugle, the director of development at the CT Humane Society, said. "When the hurricane came, the shelter became flooded and now they are trying to clean up and make space for pets that have been separated from their owners."

    Naugle said since the NBC nationwide Clear the Shetlers event two weeks ago the shelter has been under capacity, which makes them ready for extra pets right now.

    "The pets have nowhere else to go, they have no one else to help them other than the people that are running shelters in the area that has been devastated," Naugle said.

    After a long trip, the pets are going to relax for the rest of Monday night into Tuesday morning in order to de-stress. Then they will be checked out by veterinarians to make sure they are all healthy. 

    "We don’t think we will have any trouble finding 20 great homes," Naugle said.

    For more, go to the CT Humane Society's website.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    A 48-year-old New Haven man was killed in a motorcycle accident in North Haven Monday.

    Police said the rider crashed into a utility pole in front of 196 Maple Ave. around 6:20 p.m. He was pronounced dead on scene.

    The victim has not been publicly identified.

    The crash remains under investigation.


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