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  • 11/06/18--18:14: Woman Hit by Car in Wolcott

  • A woman was seriously injured when she was hit by a car while crossing the street in Wolcott Tuesday.

    Wolcott police said the woman, who is believed to be between 30 and 40 years old, was crossing Meriden Road around 6 p.m. when she was hit by a car. The victim was taken to St. Mary’s Hospital for treatment.

    The regional accident reconstruction team is investigating. The driver did remain on scene.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    Jahana Hayes has won the race for Connecticut's 5th District in the U.S. House of Representatives.

    Hayes becomes the first African-American woman to represent Connecticut in Congress.

    She defeated Republican Manny Santos.

    She thanked her supporters during her victory speech Tuesday night.

    “People have said to me, she doesn’t have what it takes, she’s not built for this. Not only am I built for this, I’m Brass City built for this,” Hayes said.

    Hayes, a first-time candidate, is a former National Teacher of the Year from 2016 who rose to fame following her selection for the award. It led to an appearance on Ellen Degeneres’ talk show, and meetings with President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama.

    “I don’t think you realize what just happened. Yesterday marked 50 years since Shirley Chisholm was elected as the first African American woman to go to Congress,” Hayes said to supporters Tuesday night. “Today, we made history by sending me to Congress.”


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    At the start of election night, when results first started dripping in, liberal twitter started to panic: Was this 2016 all over again?

    In the end, the Democrats delivered a big win, swinging enough seats from Red to Blue to take control of the House of Representatives.

    But for a few tense hours, it seemed like deja vu.

    Writer Touré tweeted: "It’s funny, this is just about the time I started freaking out on Election Day 2016. And tonight there’s still not much to be happy about. Yet." 

    That tone was set early by MSNBC pundit and former Clinton stragetist James Carville, who gave a dour prognosis on MSNBC while analyzing results in Florida, where Democrat Andrew Gillum lost the governor's race to Ron DeSantis and Bill Nelson lost to Rick Scott. 

    The Blue Wave, Carville said, wasn't going to happen.

    Twitter's response:

    "James Carville just threw water on my parade."

    "James Carville really stomped on my Democratic hopes & dreams. Stop talking to him msnbc."

    As Republicans locked up key Senate seats, winning key races in Tennessee, North Dakota, Texas and more, the outlook appeared bleak for Democrats.

    "I’m literally about to throw up."

    But then a funny thing happened: A bunch of House races started to turn blue, just as the polls in the weeks leading up to the election predicted they would. 

    Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, 29,  elected to Congress representing New York. She's the youngest woman to be elected to the House. 

    Kansas elected Sharice Davids, the first lesbian Native American woman elected to Congress. 

    First-time candidate Donna Shalala, 77, was elected to Congress in Florida, turning the 27th Congressional district blue after decades under Republican control. 

    Kendra Horn is the first Democrat to win a Congressional seat in Oklahoma's 5th district in four decades.

    And once again, James Carville set the tone.

    "I can breathe again. James Carville is smiling."

    "My mood is totally dictated by @JamesCarville. If he’s sad I’m sad. If he’s smiling, so am I."

    See more reaction to the election results alluding to a flashback to 2016 as seen on Twitter. 



    Photo Credit: Heidi Gutman/NBC
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    James Carville, Democratic Strategist and Nicolle Wallace, Republican Strategist, on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016 in New York.James Carville, Democratic Strategist and Nicolle Wallace, Republican Strategist, on Tuesday, Nov. 8, 2016 in New York.

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    The story of the 2018 election has been full of upsets and surprises, but NBC is projecting that Democrats will take control of the House and Republicans will remain in control of the Senate.


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    One of the issues that surfaced on Election Day Tuesday was wet ballots, which led to election officials hand counting ballots all night and into Wednesday.

    "We had a few issues today with wet ballots, believe it or not," Secretary of the State Denise Merrill told NBC Connecticut Tuesday.  "They can't go through the machines so if they have to be hand counted that will create some delay."

    Merrill said people dripping rain on ballots and getting them wet is a "really weird problem to have."

    "Usually, in a rainstorm, people don't show up as much. The rain did not stop people and so the ballots got wet, they wouldn't go through the machine, so many of them had to be hand counted and that is quite a process," she said.   

    She was asked if the ballots will be able to be counted overnight before Wednesday morning.

    "We might be able to dry them out and they'll go through the machine and everything will be good," Merrill said.

    It's unclear how many ballots are impacted and what precincts they came from Tuesday.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    DES MOINES, IA - OCTOBER 08: Stickers are made available to voters who cast a ballot in the midterm elections at the Polk County Election Office on October 8, 2018 in Des Moines, Iowa. Today was the first day of early voting in the state. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)DES MOINES, IA - OCTOBER 08: Stickers are made available to voters who cast a ballot in the midterm elections at the Polk County Election Office on October 8, 2018 in Des Moines, Iowa. Today was the first day of early voting in the state. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)

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    The divisive, down-to-the-wire midterm elections dominated by President Donald Trump and his denunciation of immigrants ended with Democrats gaining control of the House for the first time since 2010, according to NBC News projections.

    Victories in hard-fought races will enable the Democrats to take charge of committees, issue subpoenas and block parts of Trump's agenda. Nancy Pelosi, a target of many Republicans during the hard-fought election season, is expected to retake the role of speaker of the House.

    Trump, under investigation for possibly conspiring with Russia to win his office, has predicted he could work with Democrats. But by Wednesday morning he had tweeted, without evidence: "If the Democrats think they are going to waste Taxpayer Money investigating us at the House level, then we will likewise be forced to consider investigating them for all of the leaks of Classified Information, and much else, at the Senate level. Two can play that game!"

    Here's a look at what could be in the Democrats' plans as they wield power against Trump.

    Investigating the Trump Administration
    Democratic leaders steered clear of talk of impeachment during the campaign, although activists such as Tom Steyer have raised it frequently, and they want to allow Special Counsel Robert Mueller to complete his investigation.

    First off could be protecting Mueller's probe, a step the House Judiciary Committee unsuccessfully tried to take in September, with a bill that would have prevented Trump from firing him without good cause.

    With control of just one chamber of Congress, Democrats likely can't protect Mueller legislatively. But with control of the House, they'll have other tools. 

    Democratic Rep. Jerry Nadler, who is on the Judiciary Committee, earlier requested hearings on Trump's use of his pardon power and his attacks on the FBI and the Justice Department. Democrats on the House Intelligence Committee issued a report separate from the Republicans' finding of no evidence of collusion in the 2016 election, and it could be used for future investigations. Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff of California has said he wants to know whether Russians were laundering money through the Trump Organization.

    And Democrats are poised to ask for Trump's tax records from the IRS through a seldom-used 1924 law, which says the treasury secretary must comply with such a request. The move would likely lead to a court battle with Trump, who has guarded his returns carefully.

    Stabilizing Obamacare and Other Health Laws?
    Even as Trump painted a grim picture of an America in danger of a caravan of asylum seekers from Central America, Democrats stayed focused on health care, which, in a turnaround, was the very issue that caused them to lose control of the House in 2010. But since then, Republicans have repeatedly failed to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, votes that Democrats used against them. Key to the debate: protection for pre-existing conditions, which last year's Republican bill weakened.

    With Senate Majority Mitch McConnell threatening to try again to dismantle Obamacare, House Minority Nancy Pelosi said in an interview with The New York Times that Democrats would focus on improving it rather than immediately work to replace it with a single-payer system. Democrats also will emphasize keeping down the price of prescription drugs, with some advocating allowing the federal government to negotiate Medicare drug prices, and increasing funding for birth control.

    Infrastructure Projects That Might Have Bipartisan Appeal
    House Democrats have proposed $1 trillion in infrastructure improvements to fix roads, modernize schools, enhance rail transportation, ports and airports, protect drinking water and expand broadband access. They say the work would create more than 16 million jobs.

    Pelosi has said the package is a top priority for Democrats and it is one they might find agreement on with Trump. The president had campaigned on rebuilding the country's infrastructure in 2016. The White House wants to spark $1.3 trillion in spending from state and local governments and the private sector with $200 billion in federal spending.

    To pay for the plan, some lawmakers back raising the federal gas tax.

    Mitigating Climate Change
    Pelosi told The New York Times that if the Democrats win the House she wants to revive a select committee on climate change, to prepare legislation on conserving energy and take other steps to combat global warming and educate the public on extreme weather. The Democrats could also investigate the administration's response to Hurricane Maria, which left Puerto Rico devastated.

    Immigration Policy Oversight
    Trump urged the U.S. Supreme Court this week to consider whether his administration can quickly end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program begun under President Barack Obama — even before challenges make their way through federal courts. Democrats have opposed discontinuing the program, which has allowed 700,000 young people who are known as Dreamers and who were under 16 when they were brought to the U.S. to remain in the country. Their control of the House would enable the lawmakers to scrutinize all immigration policy. In an op-ed on NBCNews.com, Democratic Rep. Jimmy Gomez of California argued that the Oversight Committee would be able to put a spotlight on a senior adviser, Stephen Miller, who has driven the administration's attempts to restrict immigration, from ending birthright citizenship to banning immigrants from certain Muslim countries to separating families at the U.S. Mexico border.



    Photo Credit: AP Photo/Alex Brandon

    Supporters cheer as they watch returns at an election night party for Democrat congressional candidate Jennifer Wexton, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018, in Dulles, Va.Supporters cheer as they watch returns at an election night party for Democrat congressional candidate Jennifer Wexton, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018, in Dulles, Va.

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    Marijuana proponents were elated Tuesday after major cannabis measures passed in Michigan and Missouri and Democrats took control of the House.

    The victories — for recreational cannabis in Michigan and medical marijuana in Missouri — have emboldened some leaders in the prohibition reform movement to declare that they'll push for legalization in the House, NBC News reported. Utah voters also approved the legalization of medical marijuana. 

    "We are going for the jugular on this issue," said Michael Collins, interim director of national affairs for the Drug Policy Alliance.

    Michigan's initiative will tax and regulate sales of marijuana for those 21 and older. Missouri will allow medical use for doctor-approved patients who have certain conditions.

    Pot proponents were also claiming victory in key congressional races. Longtime incumbent Rep. Pete Sessions, R-Texas, was defeated Tuesday by Democrat Colin Allred. As chairman of the House Rules Committee, Sessions repeatedly blocked pro-marijuana legislation.



    Photo Credit: Richard Vogel/AP, File

    This file photo from Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, shows a marijuana plant at SLOgrown Genetics in the coastal mountain range of San Luis Obispo, California.This file photo from Tuesday, Sept. 11, 2018, shows a marijuana plant at SLOgrown Genetics in the coastal mountain range of San Luis Obispo, California.

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    The woman charged in the Brooklyn crash that killed Broadway star Ruthie Ann Miles' young daughter and unborn child has died of an apparent suicide, a senior law enforcement official briefed on the case tells NBC 4 New York.

    Dorothy Bruns, 44, was found dead in her Staten Island home Tuesday afternoon, the senior law enforcement official said. Authorities say pills and a note were found nearby.

    Miles was walking with her friend and their two young children in Park Slope on March 5 when Bruns allegedly blew through a red light and plowed into the group, killing both children — Miles’ daughter, Abigail, and the friend's 1-year-old son, Joshua. All four were found on the pavement with various injuries.

    Miles' unborn daughter initially survived the crash, but the actress miscarried a month before she was due. The loss was related to injuries from the crash. 

    Bruns was eventually indicted in connection with the case; she was arrested at her Staten Island home May 3 on a 10-count indictment charging her with manslaughter, criminally negligent homicide, assault and other crimes. She had faced 15 years in jail. 

    Bruns told police at the time she had medical issues — and though her license had been suspended she had not been criminally charged in the case until about two months after the crash. Prosecutors said she had suffered a seizure at the time of the collision, and had been driving in direct defiance of a doctor's orders following a hospitalization less than eight weeks prior. That hospitalization stemmed from yet another car crash — that time into a parked vehicle.

    Police are investigating Bruns' death, the senior law enforcement official said. 



    Photo Credit: Charles Sykes/Invision/AP

    FILE - In this June 7, 2015 file photo, Ruthie Ann Miles accepts the award for best performance by an actress in a featured role in a musical for FILE - In this June 7, 2015 file photo, Ruthie Ann Miles accepts the award for best performance by an actress in a featured role in a musical for "The King & I" at the 69th annual Tony Awards in New York. Miles was injured and her 4-year-old daughter Abigail was killed along with a 1-year-old when a driver lost control of her vehicle and slammed into them on a Brooklyn street. Police say Miles was walking with a friend who had the infant in a stroller when the driver struck them. Police say 1-year-old Joshua Lew was also killed. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP, File)

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    Compo Road South in Westport has reopened after flooding closed part of it on Wednesday.

    According to police, steady rainfall over the last few days flooded Compo Road South at the railroad underpass.

    All traffic south of the underpass was urged to use Hillspoint Road to access Greens Farms Road and the Post Road.

    The road reopened to traffic around 8:30 a.m.


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    The surge of women running in the midterm elections, many of them Democrats spurred by antipathy toward President Donald Trump, smashed a U.S. House of Representatives record, with at least 98 winning election or re-election by Wednesday morning.

    Their victories eclipsed the current tally of 84 seats held by women in the current House session. 

    The elections got off to a promising start for breaking barriers not only in the House but also the U.S. Senate and governor's races with the first result to be recorded: the territory of Guam chose Democrat Lou Leon Guerrero as its first female governor.

    When the first flip of a House seat of Tuesday night came, from Republican to Democrat, it was in a Virginia race where state Sen. Jennifer Wexton defeated the two-term GOP incumbent, Barbara Comstock. The second Democratic gain went to a woman, too. Donna Shalala, secretary of Health and Human Services under President Bill Clinton, beat Republican Maria Elvira Salazar to replace Republican Rep. Ileana Pos-Lehtinen.

    By the end of the night, Democrats had taken control of the House.

    Other firsts among Democratic women: Sharice Davids became the first gay, Native-American congresswoman in Kansas while in New York, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez became the youngest woman elected to Congress at 29. The first Muslim-American women were elected, Rashida Tlaib in Michigan and Ilhan Omar in Minnesota. Pennsylvania went from having no women in its delegation to having four. A surprise win came in in Oklahoma where Kendra Horn won what was thought a safe House seat for Republicans. And Ayanna Pressley will become the fist black woman in Congress representing Massachusetts.

    In the governor's races, Laura Kelly beat Republican Secretary of State Kris Kobach in Kansas and Gretchen Whitmer won in Michigan. In New Mexico,  Rep. Michelle Lujan Grisham was projected to become the first Democratic Hispanic woman to be elected governor.

    Among Republicans, Rep. Marsha Blackburn, was elected Tennessee’s first woman U.S. senator. In the gubernatorial races, Republican Kay Ivey retained her seat in Alabama.

    "We’re seeing this pretty important shift in the makeup, especially on the Democratic side, in terms of the leadership and who are going to be the rising stars in that party," said Eric Schickler, the Jeffrey & Ashley McDermott Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. "I do think that is one of the noteworthy shifts. Whenever there’s an open seat or a potential vulnerable Republican, female candidates did really well, probably mobilized in part by anger over Trump. And I expect to see that continue."

    But some incumbents suffered losses. Senators Heidi Heitkamp in North Dakota and Claire McCaskill in Missouri, Democrats serving in red states, came up short.

    Challenger Amy McGrath, who became the first woman Marine to pilot an F-18 in combat, lost in Kentucky for a House seat.

    A record number of women ran for office this year: 237 women for the House, up from 167 four years ago, and 23 women for the Senate, beating 2012’s record of 18, according to The Center for American Women and Politics, a division of the Eagleton Institute of Politics at Rutgers University. Sixteen women ran for governor.

    Democrats led in nominations: 77 percent of women in the House, Senate and governor’s races.

    Among progressive Democratic women, the 2016 presidential election appeared to have been a catalyst, said Kelly Dittmar, the center’s Gender Watch 2018 project director.

    “Even if they were already engaged in politics in other ways, their sense of urgency for making their voice heard in politics was even greater after the 2016 election,” she said. “Because — not just Donald Trump specifically, I think he’s often given credit in this — but more generally that it was going to be a Republican controlled government.”

    They competed to preserve health care, preserve environmental regulations and push back against other parts of the Republican agenda, she said. Many were first time candidates who worried less than women before them about having all of the right experience and credentials. Trump’s success, against Hillary Clinton, a candidate with more government qualifications, may have convinced them to dive in, Dittmar said.

    Early results from the NBC News Exit Poll showed a divide between the parties on the importance of electing more women to public office. Some 46 percent of voters said it was very important for more women to be elected; among them a large majority of Democrats, but just 18 percent of Republicans and 41 percent of independents.

    Another window into voters’ positions was their view of the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh, accused on sexual misconduct, to the U.S. Supreme Court. Voters were more likely to oppose than support his appointment, 48 percent to 43 percent, and women even more so, 53 percent to 37 percent in support. Men on the other hand supported it 50 percent to 44 percent against.

    Sierra Jackson contributed to this story.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images; AP Images
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    From top-left, clockwise: Donna Shalala, projected winner of Florida's 27th congressional district; Rashida Tlaib, projected winner of Michigan's 13th district; Marsha Blackburn, projected winner for Tennessee senator; Ilhan Omar, projected winner of Minnesota's 5th district; Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, projected winner of New York's 14th district; Sharice Davids, projected winner of Kansas's 3rd district; Jennifer Wexton, projected winner of Virginia's 10th district; Kendra Horn, projected winner of Oklahoma's 5th district.From top-left, clockwise: Donna Shalala, projected winner of Florida's 27th congressional district; Rashida Tlaib, projected winner of Michigan's 13th district; Marsha Blackburn, projected winner for Tennessee senator; Ilhan Omar, projected winner of Minnesota's 5th district; Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, projected winner of New York's 14th district; Sharice Davids, projected winner of Kansas's 3rd district; Jennifer Wexton, projected winner of Virginia's 10th district; Kendra Horn, projected winner of Oklahoma's 5th district.

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    New London Police arrested a teenager who they said used a BB gun during an armed robbery on Tuesday.

    Officers were called to a report of an armed robbery on Governor Winthrop Boulevard around 3:09 p.m.

    Police said they learned the suspect displayed a gun and threatened the victims. Officers were also given a description of the suspect.

    Officers quickly located the suspect, a 15-year-old boy, and a police K-9 was able to locate the gun used, later identified as a BB gun.

    The 15-year-old was arrested and is facing charges including carrying a dangerous weapon, threatening, reckless endangerment and breach of peace.

    The investigation is ongoing.

    If you have information about the incident, you're encouraged to call New London Police at (860) 447-5269 ext. 0. Anonymous information can also be submitted through the New London Tips 411 system by texting "NLPDTip" plus the information to Tip411 (847411).



    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

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    Voter turnout for the 2018 midterm election was around 65.5 percent, according to the Secretary of the State's website. The results are based on 704 out of 744 precincts reporting.

    "We all expected there to be somewhat of a larger turnout. This was really stunning," Secretary of the State Denise Merrill said Wednesday morning. "It surpassed recent memory in terms of a midterm election. Usually, they are between 55 and 65 percent. It looks like when we get the final number in it will be well past that, 

    Merrill said voter turnout traditionally is lower for midterm elections than when there is a vote for president. 

    "Generally in Connecticut, we'll get between a 55 and a 65 percent turnout in a midterm election, so 20 percent by mid-morning -- maybe people are beating the rain, you can't tell -- but it's high," Merrill said Tuesday.

    Voter turnout for presidential elections is around 75 or 80 percent in Connecticut, according to Merrill.

    The results posted online Wednesday morning said voter turnout was 65.5 percent.

    The Secretary of the State says the state has the highest voter registration ever, at about 2.165 million registered and thousands of same-day voter registrations.

    “Many of them young, new voters, so we have a big surge in 18- to 24-year-olds,” she said, adding that many of the registrations are coming through the Department of Motor Vehicles now. 

    Merrill said there was a big surge in voter registration with more than 300,000 since 2016, including 90,000 18- to 24-year-olds even before same-day registration.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut
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    Police have arrested a man who is accused of intentionally setting a fire at a motel in Newington earlier this year.

    Officers served an active arrest warrant on 27-year-old Guillermo Serrano, of Manchester, on Tuesday.

    A detective from the Hartford Police Fugitive Task Force identified Serrano sitting in the passenger seat of a vehicle in Hartford. After a short foot pursuit, officers said Serrano was taken into custody and turned over to the Newington Police Department.

    Serrano is accused of forcing entry into a room at the Grantmoor Motor Lodge on the Berlin Turnpike and setting a fire while guests were in other rooms at the motel on February 13.

    Serrano is facing charges including burglary, arson, criminal mischief and reckless endangerment.

    He was held on $1 million bond and was in court on Wednesday.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    Most congressional and gubernatorial races for the 2018 midterm elections have been called, but a few elections are still awaiting decisions. In two toss-up Senate elections, Republicans have narrow leads. Republicans also have narrow leads in some gubernatorial races. Democrats are leading in half of the House races that have not yet been called. 

    Here’s where the results stand for some of the key contests as of Wednesday morning:

    Mississippi Senate Special Election Goes to Runoff
    A GOP favored Senate race in Mississippi between incumbent Republican Sen. Cindy Hyde-Smith and Democrat Michael Epsy, a former U.S. secretary of agriculture, resulted in a run-off because neither candidate garnered 50 percent of the vote, NBC News reported. Hyde-Smith notched 41.5 percent of the vote and Espy 40.6 percent, with 99 percent of precincts reporting. Another Republican, Chris McDaniel, had 16.5 percent. The special election was held to fill a seat by retired Sen. Thad Cochran. Hyde-Smith and Epsy next compete in a runoff on Tuesday, Nov. 27, NBC News reported. 

    Arizona Senate Too Close to Call Before Historic Outcome
    In the U.S. Senate race to represent Arizona, Republican Rep. Martha McSally has a 0.9 percentage point lead over Democratic Rep. Kyrsten Sinema, the pair separated by nearly 16,000 votes with 75 percent of results in. McSally, a former combat pilot, competed against Sinema, a former Green party activist who campaigned as a pragmatist for the seat held by outgoing GOP Sen. Jeff Flake. Whoever wins will become Arizona's first female senator. It could take days before the victor is determined, the Arizona Republic reported. "There are a lot of outstanding ballots – especially those mailed-in – and a lot of reasons to feel good!" Sinema tweeted Wednesday. The Maricopa County recorder’s office had 472,000 ballots left to count, according to KPNX reporter Brahm Resnik.   

    Florida Senate Expected to Go to Recount
    In the Florida race for U.S. Senate, Republican Gov. Rick Scott has a .4 percentage point lead over three-term Democrat incumbent Sen. Bill Nelson, with 99 percent of the vote in. State law requires a recount when candidates are within one-half a point of each other. Nelson’s chief of staff said that the candidate has no intentions to concede the race, a move that Scott's campaign slammed after having declared victory. “This race is over. It’s a sad way for Bill Nelson to end his career," spokesman Chris Hartline told NBC. "He is desperately trying to hold on to something that no longer exists." Florida officials will not order a recount until the first set of official returns are due on Saturday, The Associated Press reported.  

    Will Stacey Abrams Force a Runoff in Georgia?
    Georgia’s much-watched election for governor between Republican two-term Secretary of State Brian Kemp and Democrat Stacey Abrams, a lawyer, former state legislative leader and romance novelist, is also still too close to call. Kemp has a 1.7 percentage point lead with 99 percent of the votes in for the race, for a lead of 66,316 votes. Kemp said that even with absentee, mail-in and provisional ballots left to count the "math is on our side." Abrams' campaign countered that there are at least 87,000 early votes and mail-in ballots left to count that could help them trigger a runoff, The Associated Press reported. Abrams campaign estimates it needs to notch nearly 25,000 votes to do so. She would become the nation's first black female governor, if elected.      

    14 House Races Yet to Be Decided
    There are also 14 House races that still have no apparent winner, six of them in California. Democrats currently lead in seven races: three in California and one each in Maine, Washington, Georgia and Utah. Republican candidates lead in seven: three in California and one each in Georgia, Minnesota, North Carolina and New Jersey. 

    Among the candidates still fighting to stay ahead of their opponents is Democrat Gil Cisneros for California’s 2nd District. Cisneros is a former Navy veteran and lottery winner.
    Republican incumbent Rep. Dana Rohrabacher in California’s 48th District is also struggling to get ahead of his challenger. Rohrabacher has cast himself as a maverick, but his Russia-friendly behavior became a weapon for the Democrats trying defeat him.
    Republican incumbent Rep. Mia Love is also facing the possibility of a narrow loss for Utah’s 4th District. Love famously refused to vote for President Trump as the Republican candidate for president in 2016. At a press conference Wednesday, Trump commented on the race by saying, “Mia Love gave me no love. And she lost.”

    Among the candidates still fighting to stay ahead of their opponents is Democrat Gil Cisneros for California’s 2nd District. Cisneros is a former Navy veteran and lottery winner.

    Republican incumbent Rep. Dana Rohrabacher in California’s 48th District is also struggling to get ahead of his challenger. Rohrabacher has cast himself as a maverick, but his Russia-friendly behavior became a weapon for the Democrats trying defeat him.

    Republican incumbent Rep. Mia Love is also facing the possibility of a narrow loss for Utah’s 4th District. Love famously refused to vote for President Trump as the Republican candidate for president in 2016. At a press conference Wednesday, Trump commented on the race by saying, “Mia Love gave me no love. And she lost.”

    —Daniel Macht and The Associated Press contributed to this report.  



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    A file photo of a ballot.A file photo of a ballot.

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    William Tong has claimed victory in the race for Connecticut’s attorney general to succeed George Jepsen, who announced that he would not seek a third term.

    “I’m ready to protect and defend Connecticut families and to be your fireball and I could not be more grateful for your confidence and support,” he said during his victory speech.

    Tong, a Democrat, was in a race against Republican Sue Hatfield and led 52 percent to 47 percent with 93 percent of precincts reporting. 

    Tong credited Hatfield with running a “tremendous campaign” and said she called him around 9 a.m. Wednesday to congratulate him.

    “I look forward to working with her going forward,” Tong said.

    SEE THE FULL ELECTION RESULTS HERE.

    “We worked hard, and made many friends along the way, but we fell just short. It was an amazing effort, and we should be proud of the enthusiasm we generated and the broad support of people across the political spectrum that rallied to our cause,” Hatfield wrote in a Facebook post.

    During a news conference Wednesday, Tong talked about issues including consumer protection, investigations into the opioid crisis, prescription drug price fixing, privacy and the crumbling foundations crisis.

    He said he is grateful to the people of the state for giving his family a “chance as immigrants to make it in this state and to succeed in a historic candidacy to be the first Asian-American attorney general, the first Asian-American constitutional officer in the history of our state and only the second elected Asian-American attorney general in the history of our great nation.”


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    A Vernon man accused of kidnapping his 21-month-old son in Canada 31 years ago has been charged with making false statements to hide his identity and receive federal benefits in the U.S.

    Allan Mann, Jr. is accused of kidnapping his son, Jermaine, in June 1987 during a court-ordered visit in Toronto.

    Authorities believe Mann took Jermaine and made his way into the U.S. He changed his name to Hailee Randolph DeSouza, changed his son's name, and got them both fake birth certificates, according to federal prosecutors.

    Using a fake birth certificate, Mann applied for a Social Security Number in 1990, authorities said. Mann used his fake identity to take advantage of benefits including Section 8 housing and Connecticut Medicaid. During the application process for HUD's Section 8 program, Mann, a citizen of both Canada and Ghana, provided a birth certificate that stated he was born in Houston, Texas in 1957. The State of Texas determined the birth certificate was counterfeit, according to prosecutors.

    Mann was found living in Section 8 subsidized housing in Vernon.

    Authorities said HUD has paid tens of thousands of dollars in housing assistance payments for Mann over the years. Medicaid has also paid tens of thousands of dollars on Mann's behalf.

    A seven-count indictment charges Mann with four counts of making a false statement, and three counts of making a false statement in a healthcare matter. Each charge carries a maximum term of imprisonment of five years.

    Mann has been in custody since Oct. 26, 2018.

    After being tried on the U.S. charges, Mann will be extradited to Canada to face prosecution for the alleged kidnapping.

    Jermaine and his mother, Lyneth Mann-Lewis, were reunited last month after 31 years apart. The family has asked for privacy.


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    Attorney General Jeff Sessions has resigned "at the request" of President Donald Trump, according to a letter he submitted to the White House, released Wednesday. 

    Here is the complete text of that undated letter.  



    Photo Credit: Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images
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    Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks at a press conference about the apprehension of a suspect in the recent spate of mail bombings at the Department of Justice on Oct. 26, 2018, in Washington, D.C.Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks at a press conference about the apprehension of a suspect in the recent spate of mail bombings at the Department of Justice on Oct. 26, 2018, in Washington, D.C.

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    Paul Manafort's former son-in-law was arrested for allegedly engaging in wire fraud and identity theft in a high-end real estate scam in Los Angeles, NBC News reported.

    Jeffrey Yohai had already pleaded guilty to different real estate-related financial crimes and was out on bond when he engaged in activities "strikingly like" what he had earlier admitted, federal prosecutors alleged in a criminal complaint unsealed Wednesday.

    Yohai, who divorced Jessica Manafort in August 2017, did deals with Paul Manafort, which special counsel Robert Mueller and federal prosecutors have examined. The complaint alleges he made false statements to investors during a lunch to the effect that "he 'turned state's evidence' on … Manafort" and "that he had to go to 'D.C.'" to meet with staff from Mueller's office or "downtown" to meet with "the feds."

    Yoahi was expected to make an initial appearance on the new charges Wednesday afternoon.



    Photo Credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Images, File

    This June 15, 2018, file photo shows former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort arrive at the E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Courthouse in Washington, D.C., for a hearing.This June 15, 2018, file photo shows former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort arrive at the E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Courthouse in Washington, D.C., for a hearing.

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    Former Mayor Rudy Giuliani spent nearly $900,000 since April, including around $12,000 on cigars and $7,100 on pens, his wife claimed at a divorce proceeding.

    Judith Giuliani and her husband of 15 years appeared in court Wednesday in New York City in the wake of their divorce filings.

    Court papers claim Rudy Giuliani, 74, spent nearly $900,000 since April, including $286,532 to support his alleged mistress, Maria Rosa Ryan, $447,938 “for his own enjoyment” and $165,165 for travel expenses.

    His wife’s counsel, meanwhile, claimed her husband spent $12,012 on cigars and $7,131 on pens since April, while simultaneously cutting her off from their credit cards.

    In response to his wife’s claims, Giuliani claimed he was dealing with a diminished income.

    His wife’s attorney, however, maintained he shouldn’t have agreed to work for President Donald Trump “for free.”

    Giuliani previously called the situation between him and his wife “amicable.”

    “In these divorce situations, you cannot place blame, it is 50/50, there are problems on both sides, Giuliani told the Post back in April.

    Toward the end of their court appearance, Judge Michael Katz urged the two to work through their issues privately with their lawyers before seeking third-party discovery.

    “It is beyond me why this is done publicly… throwing out all [your] dirty laundry for consumption,” Judge Katz said.

    The two married in 2003 in what was the third marriage for both of them.

    Giuliani was mayor of New York from 1994 to 2001.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images/File

    Rudy Giuliani and his wife Judith in 2016.Rudy Giuliani and his wife Judith in 2016.

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