Are you the publisher? Claim or contact us about this channel


Embed this content in your HTML

Search

Report adult content:

click to rate:

Account: (login)

More Channels


Showcase


Channel Catalog


Channel Description:

News Top Stories

older | 1 | .... | 891 | 892 | (Page 893) | 894 | 895 | .... | 2519 | newer

    0 0


    A special grand jury will examine whether a Fairfax County, Virginia, police officer should be criminally charged for fatally shooting an unarmed man in 2013.

    Commonwealth's Attorney Ray Morrogh said he has been given permission from the chief judge of Fairfax County Circuit to convene the grand jury, which will likely begin work by mid-summer. The work may take several weeks.

    John Geer was shot by Fairfax County Police Officer Adam Torres Aug. 29, 2013, after officers responded to a domestic dispute. Tuesday, the county agreed to settle a wrongful-death lawsuit brought by the Geer family for $2.95 million.

    The shooting led to protests against Fairfax County police. It also led to the creation of a county commission to review police department policies and the release of information to the public.

    Torres told investigators he had seen Geer's hands go toward his waist, as if reaching for a weapon. However, Geer's father and other police officers said Geer's hands were held up.

    Police initially refused to release information about the shooting and refused to turn over records to Commonwealth's Attorney Ray Morrogh. For more than a year, police would not say which officer had shot Geer.

    The officer's name was only released after Maura Harrington filed a suit, initially seeking $12 million. Harrington lived with Geer and their two children.

    "It was a tragedy that should not have happened," said Sharon Bulova, chairman of the Fairfax County Board of Supervisors. "It was tragic for John Geer, his loved ones and his family, and, frankly, tragic for Fairfax County."

    The shooting "remains under a police administrative review process and criminal investigation at both the federal and state levels," Fairfax County officials said in a statement.



    Photo Credit: NBCWashington.com

    On Jan. 8, 2015, demonstrators protested the police shooting of John Geer.On Jan. 8, 2015, demonstrators protested the police shooting of John Geer.

    0 0


    A 24-year-old Bridgeport man is facing charges after driving dangerously, narrowly avoiding a crash and pointing a pistol at another driver during a road rage incident on Route 8 southbound Wednesday morning, according to police.

    Police said Michael Perez, of Bridgeport, was weaving in and out of traffic in his white Honda Accord, speeding and nearly collided with another vehicle near exit 12 on Route 8 south. At one point, he pulled out a black pistol and pointed it at another driver.

    Perez got off the highway via exit 2 in Bridgeport. Police said a state trooper spotted him on Lewis Avenue and pulled him over. A search of the car turned up drug paraphernalia, marijuana and a pistol with a valid permit.

    Perez was charged with second-degree threatening, breach of peace, second-degree reckless endangerment, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of less than half an ounce of cannabis.

    His bond was set at $2,500. Perez is due in court May 11.



    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

    0 0


    More than 1,600 homes lost power in North Haven on Wednesday evening and traffic lights went off after strong winds brought down wires, possibly affecting a transformer, according to the police department.

    Police said crews are working to repair traffic lights on State State Street near Route 22. It's not clear how far the outages extend. In the meantime, police will direct traffic and put up temporary signs.

    Crews from United Illuminating have been working to restore power, and have reduced the number of outages in town from more than 1,600 to less than 100, according to the outage map.

    Outages have also been reported in other parts of the state, including hundreds in Hartford, Newington and Andover. Earlier Wednesday evening, 31 percent of Haddam and 19 percent of Killingworth were without power.


    0 0


    Gusty winds and torrential rain moving east across the state brought down trees and wires Wednesday evening, causing thousands of power outages statewide.

    Rumbles of thunder and wind gusts of up to nearly 40 mph were also reported in parts of the state, along with small hail in the evening hours.

    More than 1,600 homes lost power in North Haven at the height of the storm. Traffic lights were also affected, and police directed traffic and set up temporary signs.

    Eversource Energy reported thousands of outages in its coverage area as well. At one point, 31 percent of Haddam and 19 percent of Killingworth were without power, along with hundreds of residences in Newington, Hartford and Andover.

    Strong winds brought down trees on Route 10 in Southington, Middlebury Road in Middlebury, Avery Street in South Windsor, Route 147 in Middlefield.

    Wires came down on Fenn Road near King Arthur Highway in Newington, prompting a large power outage that affected a condo complex. Power lines also fell on Holmes Road and South Main Street in Newington, according to police.

    The heaviest rain is moving out to the east, but we could continue to see some scattered showers throughout the evening before skies clear around midnight.

    Flood warnings remain in effect through tomorrow for Hartford and Middlesex counties along the Connecticut River.

    If you take weather photos, send them to us at shareit@nbcconnecticut.com.



    Photo Credit: Lauren R.
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story on our mobile site.

    Strong winds brought down this tree in West Hartford on Wednesday.Strong winds brought down this tree in West Hartford on Wednesday.

    0 0


    The staff at Urban Miners in Hamden plans to use poplar and other old wood to make sheds for Connecticut Land Trust, or to sell as architectural salvage.

    "There are things that are not replaceable," said Joe DeRisi, of Urban Miners. "They have historic and cultural value."

    DeRisi said the "slow-growth lumber" he's harvesting is "more stable" than the lumber grown rapidly today.

    "It pains me to see so many good materials thrown away when we can be making small buildings and furniture," said his demolition supervisor, Christian Kling.

    Not demolition, but deconstruction is DeRisi's preferred word. He runs Urban Miners, hoping to help build a "more sustainable economy."

    "If we throw out entire buildings or materials from a renovation basically that goes into a landfill or incinerator and it increases our carbon footprint," he said.


    0 0


    An Indiana woman undergoing surgery in Los Angeles to remove a tumor experienced a twist worthy of a sci-fi plot when doctors discovered an embryonic twin in her brain.

    Yamini Karanam, 26, was unaware of what was happening in her head until she underwent a procedure designed to reach deep into the brain to extract the tumor. After waking up from the surgery, Karanam was surprised to learn of the "teratoma" -- her embryonic twin, a rarity in modern medicine, complete with bone, hair and teeth.

    Karanam realized last September that something wasn't registering in her mind. The Indiana University Ph.D. student was experiencing trouble comprehending things she read.

    "Problems with reading comprehension, listening comprehension. If a couple people were talking in a room, I wouldn't understand what was happening," Karanam said.

    What became more frustrating for Karanam was that her doctors would contradict each other regarding the source of the problem.

    "The neurologist would say the neurosurgeon is not being practical in your case," Karanam said. "And the neurosurgeon would say the neurologist is not being optimistic in your case. And I'm like, could someone be educated about this?"

    That's when her own research led her to Dr. Hrayr Shahinian at the Skullbase Institute in Los Angeles. Shahinian developed a minimally-invasive way of reaching deep into the brain to extract tumors.

    "Unlike traditional brain surgery where you open the skull and use metal retractors and you bring a microscope to see in the depths of the brain, what we're doing is keyhole surgery," he said.

    The method uses fiber-optic technology with digital imagery. A half-inch incision into the brain allows for an endoscope to reach in and slowly and very delicately chisel away at the tumor.

    Karanam awoke to learn what was causing her all that trouble in Indiana. She lightheartedly called the tumor her "evil twin sister who's been torturing me for the past 26 years."

    "This is my second one, and I've probably taken out 7,000 or 8,000 brain tumors,” Shahinian said.

    Shahinian said his fear was that tumor may be cancerous. Pathologists, though, determined that not to be the case and Karanam is expected to make a full recovery in only three weeks.

    Karanam said her biggest frustration was that so many other brain surgeons had no idea Shahinian's technique was available.

    "It's really unfair that people don't know about it," she said. "This has to be mainstream. This is the first thing that they should get you. When they know you have a pineal tumor, they should tell you, ‘You know what? There's a minimally invasive approach in which they won't kill you, they won't leave you with a disability. There's a way in which you can live your life just the way you want to.’”

    Shahinian said before he invented his technique, the only option to remove this type of tumor would have been surgery that included removing half of the skull. He says because the brain is such a sensitive organ, the less it's disturbed, the better.

    "We want to be in and out without the brain knowing we were there, and I think that's the beauty of this technique," Shahinian said. 



    Photo Credit: KNBC

    Yamini Karanam, 26, pictured on Tuesday, April 20, 2015, underwent brain surgery in Los Angeles to have a tumor removed. But doctors discovered that the object was not a tumor, but instead her embryonic twin.Yamini Karanam, 26, pictured on Tuesday, April 20, 2015, underwent brain surgery in Los Angeles to have a tumor removed. But doctors discovered that the object was not a tumor, but instead her embryonic twin.

    0 0
  • 04/22/15--18:33: Travel Agent Stole $80K: DA

  • A Queens travel agency owner has been indicted on charges of stealing more than $80,000 in payments for trips that were never booked and using customers’ credit card information to pay for other customers’ trips, prosecutors say.

    Adriana Olivar-Munoz, who owns Expertravel Travel Agency in Jackson Heights, is named in a 20-count indictment that includes charges of grand larceny, identity theft, falsifying business records, scheming to defraud and petit larceny, according to the Queens district attorney’s office. It was not immediately known if she had an attorney.

    Prosecutors say the 46-year-old business owner would print out itinerary confirmations and give them to customers who later discovered at the airport that their tickets had not been paid for and canceled. In some cases, victims of Olivar-Munoz’s scheme would fly to their travel destinations before realizing a return ticket had never been purchased, according to prosecutors.

    The indictment lists ten or more victims, including two wholesale travel agencies, for the scheme that allegedly took place between December 2012 and December 2014, according to the DA.

    Prosecutors say the scam was discovered when Olivar-Munoz was arrested last September for defrauding two customers who had purchased tickets to Colombia and later realized they had been charged $1,311.40 for airline tickets for other passengers. Investigators later received complaints from several more customers who said they had also been defrauded.

    Anyone who believes they may have been a victim to this travel agency fraud scheme is asked to call the Queens District Attorney’s Economic Crimes Bureau at 718-286-6673. 



    Photo Credit: AP

    0 0


    East Windsor is considering welcoming a new casino.

    With state legislators looking for ways to keep gamblers – and their money – in Connecticut instead of losing them to Massachusetts, the lawmakers are exploring the possibility of a new casino along the I-91 corridor.

    East Windsor selectmen have voted to explore the pros and cons of having a casino in their town.

    First Selectman Denise Menard said they've got plenty of room: an old movie theater, a former Wal-Mart and an empty banquet hall, all just off the highway.

    Menard said she's been researching the idea for weeks, talking to police, the superintendent of schools and many others who would be impacted by such a development, and most of her findings have been positive.

    But any decision to open a casino in East Windsor, Menard said, would ultimately go to the voters who, at this point, she believes are split 50-50 on the idea.

    And, long before it would go to vote in East Windsor, the building of a new casino would first have to be approved by the legislature – and the odds may be against it.



    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

    0 0


    A Bloomfield police officer has been placed on paid administrative leave after he was arrested for allegedly driving drunk over the weekend, according to Capt. Steven Hajdasz.

    State police arrested Officer Adrian Loignon, 30, early Saturday morning near his home in Burlington. He was not on duty at the time.

    According to state police, a resident spotted Loignon driving erratically and told dispatchers he struck a guardrail at the intersection of Route 4 and Vineyard Road.

    Loignon was charged with driving while intoxicated, reckless driving, evading a motor vehicle accident and following too close, according to state police.

    Hajdasz said the department is investigating Loignon's conduct.

    According to information from the town of Bloomfield, Loignon completed his field training program in June 2013 and began work as a full-time police officer that summer.

    Loignan posted $1,000 bond and is due in Bristol Superior Court the morning of April 27.

    He could not be reached for comment Wednesday evening.


    0 0


    A man suspected of firing a gun inside a bar has died in a police-involved shooting in the Jamaica section of Queens Wednesday, police confirmed. 

    Officers were responding to a report of shots fired after 9 p.m. at a bar in the area of 168th Street and Hillside Avenue when they encountered the suspect running out of the bar, police said. 

    Police chased the suspect, and he fired shots at the officers, according to police. When the suspect turned a corner, he turned around and pointed his gun again at officers, and that's when police shot him. 

    The unidentified suspect was taken to Jamaia Hospital where he died, police said. 

    One witness who did not want to be named said he saw a police officer running from the bar toward Hillside Avenue with his gun drawn, "telling everyone to get out of the way."

    "By the time he went around the corner, there were four shots that I heard," the witness said. 

    Witnesses said they saw officers administering CPR on the suspect before he was taken to Jamiaca Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. 

    No officers were injured. A loaded Glock 9mm was recovered on the scene.


    0 0


    Four models of Shark vacuum cleaners are being recalled due to a shock hazard, the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) announced Wednesday.

    The CPSC said the aluminum wand can disconnect from the vacuum's handle, posing a risk of electric shock. More than 62 reports have been received about the wand disconnecting from the vacuum, but no injuries have been reported.

    The recall involves four models of Shark Rotator Powered Lift-Away upright vacuum cleaners, either maroon or purple, with a clear plastic middle section. "Shark" and "Rotator" are printed on the front of the vacuum cleaners. They are about 45 inches tall by 12 inches wide.

    Recalled model numbers include NV650W, NV651, NV652 and NV660. The model number is printed on a silver sticker on the upper right corner on the back of the vacuum, the CPSC said. More descriptive information and photos are available at the CPSC's website.

    About 142,000 vacuums in the United States and about 650 in Canada are included in the recall.

    Customers should immediately stop using the recalled models and contact Euro-Pro for a free replacement wand.

    You can call Euro-Pro at 877-593-5140 between 7 and 11 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays, or between 9 a.m. and 8 p.m. on Sundays, or go to www.sharkrecall.com, or click "Recall" at www.sharkclean.com or www.europro.com.



    Photo Credit: CPSC

    0 0


    A Manchester family narrowly avoided injury after strong winds toppled a tree on the property on Wednesday evening, severing the trunk and sending it smashing through a second-story room.

    Footage from the scene shows a gaping hole in the roof of the two-story home at 71 Delmont Street. The homeowner said children usually play in the damaged room, but in a move that saved their lives, they decided to stay downstairs and play video games.

    "Normally my nephew would be up in that room and he was downstairs, so we're just so thankful for that," said homeowner Wendy Silver. "All that matters is everyone is just fine."

    Firefighters were called to the property around 5:15 p.m. and crews cordoned off the home, which is uninhabitable.

    The tree is one of several to come down during the storm Wednesday evening, cutting power to thousands of homes around the state.



    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

    0 0


    New Haven city leaders are launching a new nonprofit today to improve the quality of life in the city.

    The New Haven Police Foundation will partner the police force with residents and the business community to help meet public safety goals and improve initiatives that engage the city's youth. Part of the goal is to work with the community to help obtain resources that are not yet available from the city, including equipment, new technology and training.

    The announcement comes after several violent crimes in New Haven this month.

    On April 6, Sanjay Patel, 39, was shot more than five times during a robbery at the Pay Rite Food Store at the Citgo station on Forbes Avenue and died at Yale-New Haven Hospital an hour later.

    On April 19, Jericho Scott, a 16-year-old baseball star, was shot and killed in front of his home.

    On April 20, Lyndell Moore, 29, of New Haven, was shot on Townsend Street and continued to drive until losing control of his vehicle and crashing. He was then rushed to the hospital, where he died.

    A news conference to roll out the foundation will be held at 11:30 a.m. this morning at police headquarters.



    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

    0 0


    A Connecticut-bound SkyWest flight went into a sudden nose dive Wednesday, dropping 20,000 feet in minutes and terrifying dozens on board, when three passengers lost consciousness in what the crew initially feared may have been a sudden loss of cabin pressure.

    The plane, which had been en route from Chicago to Bradley International in Hartford, was forced to make an emergency landing in Buffalo, the airline said.

    A registered nurse on board said the crew enlisted her help when the first passenger grew faint just an hour into the flight from Chicago's O'Hare International Airport to Bradley International Airport in Hartford.

    "They told me someone was passed out. The passenger was lethargic. Pretty much, she was responding, but her coloring was awful; she didn't look good. We got her some oxygen and she was much more alert after getting oxygen," said Niantic resident Mary Cunningham, a registered nurse. "I went back to my seat after she was feeling better, and all of a sudden, the woman sitting behind her passed out unresponsive."

    It wasn't long before Cunningham, too, began to feel lightheaded and short of breath.

    "I felt very nervous. I realized something was very wrong, and it was really scary," said Cunningham. "That was terrifying."

    It's not clear what caused the passengers to fall ill. An aviation source said earlier that the main cabin door may have opened mid-air due to a mechanical issue, causing rapid decompression.

    Officials from SkyWest later told NBC News there was no problem with the cabin door, but before the pilot knew, he descended to 10,000 feet, where the air is breathable. According to NBC News, the plane dropped more than 20,000 feet in a matter of minutes.

    "One of the flight attendants was kind of in a panic. She ran up front, talked to the captain about something," said another passenger, Dave Barkley, of South Bend, Indiana. "They had a couple passengers not feeling well; one passed out, and so they took a rapid descent because the captain had said all the symptoms led him to believe it was a lack of cabin pressure."

    Passengers called it a nose dive and said they could hear the engines rattling.

    "It was scary," said Larry Johnson, of Fort Myers, Florida. "There was a lot of people with their heads down, praying."

    The crew declared an emergency. The Embraer 170 landed safely at Buffalo International Airport at 11:40 a.m., according to the Federal Aviation Authority. The passengers were ushered off the aircraft and checked by medical personnel on the ground, and none was hspitalized, the airline said.

    "After examination by maintenance personnel and local authorities, there have been no indications of a pressurization problem or other issues with the aircraft," the airline said in a statement, adding that it was still investigating.

    Chicopee, Massachusetts, resident Steven Marcil said he was one of about 30 passengers to receive oxygen on the ground before boarding a second plane.

    "It was very traumatizing, very scary when you're actually in your seat and the seat goes into a nose dive. It was a close call, really a close call," Marcil said.

    Passengers said they were asked to get off the second aircraft after boarding in Buffalo so law enforcement dogs could sniff them and sweep the plane.

    "When we were in Buffalo, they had a dog go through everybody when we were sitting in the terminal, like they were looking for something, but that might have been standard procedure," said Barkley. "Fire department and dogs and policemen went onto that second plane."

    Despite the fear and uncertainty, passengers commended the pilot and crew members for their quick thinking and immediate action.

    "I'm grateful that they care enough about safety and security," Barkley said. "I'd rather have that than trouble otherwise."

    The plane left Buffalo around 5 p.m. and arrived in Connecticut shortly after 6 p.m.

    Officials with the FAA said they plan to investigate.



    Photo Credit: NBC Newschannel

    A United Express flight being operated by Sky West from Chicago to Hartford had to make an emergency landing in Buffalo on Wednesday.A United Express flight being operated by Sky West from Chicago to Hartford had to make an emergency landing in Buffalo on Wednesday.

    0 0


    Residents across part of Connecticut are cleaning up after gusty winds and torrential rain caused damage last night, brought a tree down onto a house in Manchester and caused thousands of power outages statewide.

    A tree came crashing down on the home at 71 Delmont Street and the homeowner said children usually play in the damaged room, but in a move that saved their lives, they decided to stay downstairs and play video games.

    Wind gusts of up to nearly 40 mph were reported in parts of the state and more than 1,600 homes lost power in North Haven at the height of the storm. Traffic lights were also affected, and police directed traffic and set up temporary signs.

    Small hail was also reported in the evening hours.

    Eversource Energy reported thousands of outages in its coverage area as well. At one point, 31 percent of Haddam and 19 percent of Killingworth were without power, along with hundreds of residences in Newington, Hartford and Andover.

    As of Thursday morning, power was back on for all but three customers.

    Strong winds brought down trees on Route 10 in Southington, Middlebury Road in Middlebury, Avery Street in South Windsor, Route 147 in Middlefield.

    Wires came down on Fenn Road near King Arthur Highway in Newington, prompting a large power outage that affected a condo complex. Power lines also fell on Holmes Road and South Main Street in Newington, according to police.

    Flood warnings remain in effect through tomorrow for Hartford and Middlesex counties along the Connecticut River.

    If you take weather photos, send them to us at shareit@nbcconnecticut.com.


    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story on our mobile site.

    0 0


    Dr. Warren Weinstein, of Maryland, and Italian Giovanni Lo Porto, hostages held by al Qaeda, were killed inadvertently during a U.S. drone strike in January. President Barack Obama apologized to the aid workers' families and said that in the fog of war sometimes "deadly mistakes" are made.

    Other Americans citizens have been killed in strikes in Pakistan and Yemen, most accused of plotting against the United States.

    The most notorious was Anwar al Awlaki, a radical Muslim cleric whom the American government targeted in a drone attack in September 2011 in Yemen. Born in New Mexico, he was considered a potential successor to Osama bin Laden.

    Killed with al Awlaki was Samir Khan, accused of editing the magazine "Inspire," published by al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula. The government said that the magazine inspired Boston Marathon bombers, Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. Khan was born in Saudi Arabia and raised in Queens, New York. The United States was unaware that he was with al Awlaki.

    Al Awlaki’s 16-year-old son, Abdulrahman, who was born in Denver, was killed two weeks later while eating dinner at an outdoor restaurant in Yemen.

    A fourth, Jude Kenan Mohammad, was killed in a strike in Pakistan in 2011. He had been indicted in North Carolina on charges of conspiracy to murder and provide support to terrorists.

    Attorney General Eric Holder acknowledged that United States had killed the four in a 2013 letter to the then chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, Sen. Patrick Leahy.

    The American Civil Liberties Union and the Center of Constitutional Rights filed a lawsuit in 2012 challenging the constitutionality of the killings. The lawsuit was dismissed in April.

    The deaths of two other Americans accused of being terrorists were acknowledged by President Obama on Thursday.

    Ahmed Farouq was killed with the two hostages on Jan. 14, in a strike in the Hindu Kush region along the Afghan/Pakistan border. Little is know about Farouq. Evan Kohlmann of Flash Intelligence told NBC News that he was a deputy commander of al Qaeda in Pakistan.

    Adam Gadahn, a 36-year-old born in California and an alleged al Qaeda translator and key propagandist, was killed in a strike five days later in the same area. He had been indicted in California on charges of treason and providing material support for terrorism.

    In a statement Thursday, the ACLU said the killings raised troubling questions about the reliability the United States was relying on to justify the drone attacks.

    "In each of the operations acknowledged today, the U.S. quite literally didn't know who it was killing," the statement said.



    Photo Credit: AP
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story on our mobile site.

    Aid worker Dr. Warren Weinstein was killed inadvertently with a fellow hostage being held by al Qaeda in a U.S. drone strike along the Afghan/Pakistan border, President Obama announced on Thursday, April 23, 2015.Aid worker Dr. Warren Weinstein was killed inadvertently with a fellow hostage being held by al Qaeda in a U.S. drone strike along the Afghan/Pakistan border, President Obama announced on Thursday, April 23, 2015.

    0 0


    Police said a man pulled a gun on the customer behind him at a Branford Taco Bell drive-thru on Wednesday night because the other customer beeped at him.

    The altercation happened at the drive-thru of Taco Bell, at 960 West Main Street, around 10:30 p.m., according to a news release from police.

    The victim told authorities that he was in line at the drive-thru when a man approached him, pointed a handgun at him and fled in a vehicle.

    With help from the victim, Branford Police Officer Matthew Clerkin found the vehicle a short distance away, with the gun inside.

    Police arrested the passenger, Joaquim Silva, 24, of East Haven, after determining that he pulled the gun because the victim beeped his horn while Silva was waiting in line, police said.

    Silva was charged with threatening in the first degree, breach of peace, reckless endangerment in the first degree and criminal use of a firearm.

    Police said the woman who drove the car had a valid permit to carry a firearm, but Silva did not, so he was charged with criminal possession of a firearm, according to police.

    Silva was held on a $100,000 bond and arraigned in New Haven Court. It's not clear if he has an attorney.
     



    Photo Credit: Branford Police

    Joaquim Silva is accused of pulling a gun on the customer who beeped at him in line at a Taco Bell drive-thru.Joaquim Silva is accused of pulling a gun on the customer who beeped at him in line at a Taco Bell drive-thru.

    0 0


    Police have arrested a man accused of exposing himself to an employee at a Gap store in Milford last month.

    Police received a complaint on March 12 about a man exposing his genitalia to an employee of the Gap store 1201 Boston Post Road. The man was identified as Jeremy Wilson, 25.

    Wilson was charged with public indecency and breach of peace in the second degree.

    Bond was set at $2,500. Wilson is due in court on May 19.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    0 0


    Police have arrested a man accused of taking money to renovate a kitchen in a Milford home, then not following through on it.

    Police said they received a complaint from a resident of Hauser Street in Milford who reported signing a contract with Timothy Kovalsky, 35, of Shelton, in December and giving him a partial payment of $2,886.87, but he never finished the work.

    Kovalsky went by the company name ”Exquisite Remodeling,” according to police, and the victims tried to get their money back when he failed to do the work, but they were not able to.

    When police checked with the department of Consumer Protection, they found Kovalsky’s home improvement contractor’s certificate expired in 2012 and there was no record of a certificate for the business name.

    Kovalsky was arrested and charged with performing home improvement without a valid certificate, failure to refund home improvement payment and larceny in the third degree.

    While he was in police custody, a computer check revealed that Kovalsky had an outstanding warrant for an arrest from state police, which accuses him of failing to appear in court for motor vehicle offenses in December 2014, so he was also charged with second-degree failure to appear in court.
    Bond was set at $1,000 and he is due in court on May 19.
     


    0 0


    A man suspected of slashing his estranged wife’s throat in Milford, Connecticut on Sunday night, then stabbing the elderly man she had been hired to care for is still missing and could be in Connecticut, New Jersey or Pennsylvania, police said.

    Police have been looking for Amado Rodriguez, 48, since responding to a home on Washington Street just after 7:30 p.m. on Sunday and found his estranged wife with a bad cut on her neck.

    The female victim, and Rodriguez's estranged wife, is the live-in caretaker for an elderly Milford man, who was also injured in the attack. Rodriguez is believed to have stabbed both victims. 

    Police said he went into the house without permission, went into the woman’s bedroom and cut her throat with a knife while she was sleeping.

    Then he attacked the elderly male, who has vision impairment, stole the man’s car and fled, police said. Both victims have since been released from the hospital.

    Rodriguez, who has ties to New Britain; Bradley Beach and Neptune Township, New Jersey; and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; is still on the loose.

    Police have obtained a warrant charging him with assault in the first degree, first-degree assault on an elderly person, home invasion, first-degree burglary, larceny in the second degree and criminal violation of a restraining order.

    Rodriguez is 5-foot-11, weighs 280 pounds and has a clean-shaven face and head. He is believed to be driving a gray 2011 Hyundai Tucson with Connecticut plates 826YTB.

    He is considered armed and dangerous and should not be approached.

    If you have information on his whereabouts, call Milford Det. Jeffrey Cortes at 203-877-1465 or email him at jcortes@ci.milford.ct.us.



    Photo Credit: Milford Police

    Amado Rodriguez is believed to armed and dangerous. He is suspected of stabbing his estranged wife and the man she was a caretaker for.Amado Rodriguez is believed to armed and dangerous. He is suspected of stabbing his estranged wife and the man she was a caretaker for.

older | 1 | .... | 891 | 892 | (Page 893) | 894 | 895 | .... | 2519 | newer