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    A watchdog group on Monday is expected to file a legal complaint with the Federal Trade Commission against Google over a new program that links customers' web activity to in-store purchases.

    The Electronic Privacy Information Center is asking for a full investigation into the tech giant's Store Sales Measurement program, which aims to show advertisers that clicks online do lead to purchases at brick-and-mortor stores.

    According to EPIC's complaint, Google’s consumer profiling technology can allegedly track 70 percent of all credit and debt card transactions in the U.S. without revealing how they got the information.

    The group alleges Google is also putting shoppers' personal information — including product searches, location searches and payment information — at risk of hacks by not revelaing what encryption it's using to protect the data from breaches.

    Critics worry that the personal information could end up in the wrong hands. But Google argues that the program helps prove the effectiveness of online ads. The Mountain View-based company adds that it does not share or give a third party company access to customers' information and that customers can opt out of the program.

    The complaint accuses Google of failing to provide customers with a reasonable way to opt out, calling the process "burdensome, opaque and misleading."




    Photo Credit: Getty Images

    File imageFile image

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    A Farmington police officer is recovering after being struck by a dump truck while directing traffic on Route 4 Monday morning.

    Police said the officer was on Route 4 near High Street directing traffic around construction when the accident occurred around 11:30 a.m. The injuries were not life-threatening.

    The driver of the dump truck was cited and the truck is being inspected by Department of Motor Vehicle inspectors.

    No other details were immediately available.


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    Robbie, a 9-year-old boy with autism from upstate New York, loves rainbows -- and when his parents died weeks apart -- his aunt, now his legal guardian, asked the world for help making him smile.

    The world responded. 

    Crystal Skawinski has been Robbie's legal guardian since May 25, a day after his father died of an overdose and 23 days after his mother lost a long battle with a gasteoparisis and cystic fibrosis. Skawinski says Robbie has been told his parents went over the rainbow bridge -- and he looks for them eagerly. So on July 24, Skawinski put a post on Facebook soliciting rainbow photos from around the world. 

    As of Friday, she had gotten nearly 6,000. And Skawinski says she has been floored by the touching responses. 

    "I'm speechless. This doesn't happen to regular people," she wrote on Facebook early Sunday. "Thanks big sis for making your son a part of the world and to touch thousands of hearts. We miss you guys SO much. Hope you are enjoying Heaven!" 

    Skawinski also pledged to make her sister and brother-in-law proud as a parent to their little boy.



    Photo Credit: Crystal Skawinski

    Robbie lost his parents just weeks apart a few months ago. He's only 9 years old.Robbie lost his parents just weeks apart a few months ago. He's only 9 years old.

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    A study from job site CareerBuilder finds that overall 61 percent of American workers think the idea of a work day that starts at 9 a.m. and ends at 5 p.m. is an outdated one.

    The poll’s research indicated the city that’s most likely to advocate for change in the work day is the nation’s capital of Washington, D.C. where 73 percent of workers want to do away with the standard work day. By contrast, the cities of Philadelphia and Miami each at 55 percent are most likely to agree with the average work day being relevant.

    The study not only indicated which cities are most and least likely to support the eight-hour work day; age and industry were accounted for among the results of nearly 3,700 full-time workers.

    Three-quarters of workers who hold positions in the leisure and hospitality industry are most likely to believe the traditional work day is irrelevant, as the demands of those in that industry frequently have non-routine hours.

    Possibly the most result of this online research conducted by Harris Poll from May-June of this year is the age breakdown when it comes to the traditional work day. Those in the 45-54 age demographic are most likely to believe the 9-5 work day needs to be revitalized as more than 2/3 find that idea to be outdated.

    Conversely millennials are most likely to hold the belief the traditional work day being commonplace as more workers between the ages of 18 and 24 agree with the poll’s question, indicating maybe the 9-to-5 work day is relevant for future generations.

    The demands of the industry are certainly changing, as Rosemary Haefner, the Chief Human Resources Officer for CareerBuilder indicates, “between new technology and global workplace dynamics, companies are being tasked to implement flexible work arrangements for everyone, across cities, generations and industries.”

    Haefner adds there are certain tools companies can possess which can make employees have more productive experiences at work saying, “Many companies fear that without a set schedule, employees will be distracted, not as engaged and less productive, but the opposite is often true. A trusting work environment breeds more-loyal employees and increases efficiency as long as there's structure around it."

    The survey adds time management strategies to help workers which they believe would make experiences at their job more enjoyable, such as being aware of the rules of the workplace, getting into a rhythm, and being on time.

    You can view the results of the survey here.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

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    A 79-year-old Torrington woman has died of injuries sustained when she was hit by a minivan in Torrington Saturday evening.

    The accident happened on Main Street near the McDonald's around 6:00 p.m.

    The victim, identified as Nellie Crowston, was first transported to Charlotte Hungerford Hospital but was later flown by Lifestar medical helicopter to Hartford Hospital, police said. On Sunday she died of her injuries.

    The driver of the minivan remained on scene.

    Main Street was closed in the area of McDermott Avenue for hours. The Torrington Accident Investigation team has now taken over the investigation.

    No charges have been filed at this time.

    Anyone who may have witnessed the accident is asked to contact the Torrington Police Department at 860-489-2000.

    (CORRECTION: 7/31/17 2:15 p.m.): Police initially indicated that Crowston was 89. Police later corrected that information and said she was 79. The story above has been corrected.



    Photo Credit: Josie Albertson-Grove, Republican-American

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    Dallas police officers responding to a noise complaint ended up being "guests of honor" at a wedding party, as seen in viral cellphone video.

    Telemundo 39 reports officers responded to a call Saturday night about a wedding party that got too loud.

    In the video, the officers can be seen dancing with attendants and helping the newly married couple, Gloria and Mario Hernandez, celebrate.

    "It is a pleasure that we are united in this world. We are all equal before the eyes of God. Bravo for these policemen, they pulled a 100," Rosa Hernandez wrote on social media.

    The hosts said the officers stayed, took pictures and even had some cake.

    The video, shared on Facebook by Ana Gomez, has been viewed more than 200,000 times after being shared more than 1,400 times.

    Dallas police told NBC 5 Monday that what took place at the Hernandez's wedding is not that unusual of an occurrance.

    "Dallas police officers are having positive interactions like this one with the community every day and it’s always great when these moments are captured on video and shared for everyone to see," a department spokesperson said. "Our department takes pride in the strong relationship we have with our community and this moment exemplifies the positive impact of community policing."



    Photo Credit: Ana Gomez

    Dallas police officers pose with Gloria and Mario Hernandez after responding to a noise complaint at their wedding party.Dallas police officers pose with Gloria and Mario Hernandez after responding to a noise complaint at their wedding party.

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    Orange police are searching for a suspect accused of robbing the Webster Bank on Boston Post Road Monday.

    Police said that just before 11 a.m. Monday the suspect entered the bank at 247 Boston Post Road and demanded money from a teller. He did not imply or show a weapon, police said.

    The suspect made off with an undetermined amount of money and fled toward Firelight plaza.

    The suspect was wearing jeans, a baseball cap and light colored shirt.

    Anyone with information on this crime is asked to contact Detective Sean Murphy at 203.891.2138 or via email at smurphy@orange-ct.gov.



    Photo Credit: Orange Police Department

    Orange police say the suspect pictured above robbed the Webster Bank at 247 Boston Post Road Monday morning.Orange police say the suspect pictured above robbed the Webster Bank at 247 Boston Post Road Monday morning.

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    Anthony Scaramucci's short tenure has given Twitter plenty to talk about.

    The former White House communications director’s sudden departure after his short stint in the position has left journalists, politicians and meme-enthusiasts looking for a way to respond. From his profanity-laced tirade in an interview with The New Yorker to his air kiss after his first press briefing, the Mooch made his mark in the public eye.

    As the news broke, the internet blew up with commentary.




    Photo Credit: AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais
    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

    In this Tuesday, July 25, 2017, photo, White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci speaks to members of the media at the White House in Washington.In this Tuesday, July 25, 2017, photo, White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci speaks to members of the media at the White House in Washington.

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    Most people won't consider eating five bacon double cheeseburgers from Burger King, but that's the calorie equivalent of one Buffalo Wild Wings Cheese Curd Bacon Burger with fries.

    That's just one of the "nutritional nightmares" the nonprofit Center for Science in the Public Interest has called out in its latest Xtreme Eating Awards.

    The annual awards "dishonors" chain restaurant meals that exceed the recommended daily allowances of calories (2,000), sodium (2,300 mg), saturated fats (20 g) and added sugar (50 g).

    "These meals are extreme, but even the typical dishes served at restaurants are a threat to Americans' health because they increase the risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and more," CSPI Senior Nutritionist Lindsay Moyer said in a statement.

    The 2010 Affordable Care Act included provisions requiring calorie counts on the menus and menu boards of chains with 20 or more outlets. The Food and Drug Administration had scheduled the rules to go into effect on May 5 of this year. But less than a week before that deadline, lobbyists for pizza chains, supermarkets, and convenience stores convinced the Trump administration to delay the implementation date.

    The decision prompted the CSPI to confer its first-ever Xtreme Putting Profits Before Public Health Award to Domino’s Pizza — the loudest industry voice opposing calorie labeling.

    "Who cares about the obesity and diabetes epidemics, as long as the cash keeps rolling in to one of the nation’s premier purveyors of white flour and cheese?" the group said in a news release.

    From the belt-busting Carnivore Pizzadilla to the caloric Flying Gorilla cocktail milkshake, here are some of the worst offenders of 2017.

    Worst Cheese in a Leading Role: Buffalo Wild Wings' Cheese Curd Bacon Burger

    A regular burger with deep fried cheese curds, bacon, American cheese, and something called “cool heat sauce,” Buffalo Wild Wings’ cheese curd bacon burger comes with a side of fries and contains 53 g of saturated fat and 1,950 calories, according to CSPI.

    Worst Visceral Effects: Chili’s Ultimate Smokehouse Combo

    A sort of create-your-own-adventure meal, Chili’s Ultimate Smokehouse Combo contains a little bit of everything. Diners choose three meat from a list that includes BBQ chicken breast, jalapeño-cheddar smoked sausage, battered Chicken Crispers, or a half rack of baby back ribs, plus four sides.  That's 2,440 calories, 41 g of saturated fat and a ridiculous 7,610 mg of sodium. While CSPI notes that this meal contains enough sodium for nearly four days, it is also possible that the sheer quantity of this meal could last for the same amount of time. 

    Least Original Breakfast: IHOP Cheeseburger Omelette With Pankcakes

    IHOP’s cheeseburger omelette is loaded with chunks of ground beef, hash browns, tomatoes, onions, American cheese, and topped with ketchup, mustard and pickles and comes with a stack of buttermilk pancakes on the side. The meal contains just about an entire day's worth of calories (1,900) and added sugar (44 g), plus double the amount of saturated fat (45 g) and sodium (4,580 mg), and a whopping three-days worth of cholesterol (1,005 mg). As CSPI notes, “it’s the equivalent of eating four McDonald’s Sausage Egg McMuffins drizzled with two tablespoons of syrup.”

    In a statement, an IHOP spokesperson said that while it applauds the CSPI's efforts, "it's misleading to single out the highest meal combinations without informing people of the wide range of choices offered at our restaurants that meet a variety of dietary needs. Our commitment is to offer guests flavorful, inventive all-day breakfast dishes that can be enjoyed as they see fit - whether it's every day or occasionally depending on how they choose to live a balanced lifestyle."

    Worst Adapted Pasta: The Cheesecake Factory Pasta Napoletana

    The Cheesecake Factory, which has appeared on the list every year since it began in 2007, is on the list this time twice: for worst cocktail for its Flying Gorilla, and worst pasta dish for the Pasta Napoletana.

    How do you turn a meat lover’s pizza into a pasta? Start with a mountain of spaghetti, then heap it with Italian sausage, pepperoni, meatballs, bacon, butter and cream, of course. The Cheesecake Factory's Pasta Napoletana is like eating a Pizza Hut Meat Lover's Personal Pan Pizza, but with an additional cup of pasta and a cup of heavy cream,  the CSPI says.

    "With more than 250 menu items, The Cheesecake Factory has always been about choices," said spokeswoman Aletha Rowe, in a statement to NBC. "Many of our guests come in and want to celebrate and not be concerned with calories. Others want to share their dish - and we love it when guests share - that's a great sign that our portions are generous - and a large percentage of our guests take home leftovers for lunch the next day."

    "For our calorie conscious guests we have our award-winning SkinnyLicious menu featuring nearly 50 delicious choices with 590 calories or less - which is actually larger than many restaurants entire menus," Rowe added.

    Worst Original Appetizer: Dave & Buster’s Carnivore Pizzadilla

    What’s the most calorie-dense portmanteau of a food item imaginable? The award goes to Dave & Buster’s Carnivore Pizzadilla. The 12-inch pizza quesadilla hybrid with cheese, pepperoni, and Italian sausage. The dish packs 67 grams of saturated fat and 4,700 mg of sodium, the equivalent of 100 slices of pepperoni layered atop two Taco Bell Cheese Quesadillas or half a stick of butter melted over three McDonald’s Quarter Pounders with Cheese, the CSPI said.

    Most Damage From Supporting Vegetable: Texas Roadhouse Prime Rib, Loaded Sweet Potato, Ceasar Salad

    The Texas Roadhouse’s Loaded Sweet Potato was voted worst side at (770) and comes covered in marshmallows and caramel sauce. It's one of two sides diners can get with the 16 oz prime rib (1,570). Add a Caesar salad as your second side, and it’s like eating two of the chain’s 12 oz. New York strip steak dinners, according to the CSPI.

    "We are proud of our made-from-scratch food and the vast menu options that we offer our guests," a Texas Roadhouse spokesperson said in a statement to NBC. "We also list calories on our menu and online, which allows our guests to choose what they feel is best for them."

    Most Ridiculous Ending: Uno Pizzeria & Grill Ridiculously Awesome, Insanely Large Chocolate Cake

    Truly both awesome in the literal sense of the word and insane in the colloquial one, a slice of Uno Pizzeria’s “Ridiculously Awesome, Insanely Large Chocolate Cake” weighs over a pound and contains an estimated 168g of sugar and 1,740 calories, according to CSPI. And while it may be appealing to hard core chocolate lovers, this confection is not for the faint of heart, literally.

    NBC's Danielle Abreu contributed to this story.



    Photo Credit: Courtesy Chilli's

    hili’s Ultimate Smokehouse Combo is hili’s Ultimate Smokehouse Combo is "More flavor than can fit on a plate.” The dish earned the Center for Science in the Public Interest award for Worst Visceral Effects of 2017.

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    NBC Connecticut Meteorologists are forecasting temperatures to climb to near 90 degrees tomorrow. 

    High temperatures on Monday reached the upper 80s for much of the state.

    Take a look at forecasted high temperatures for tomorrow. The warmest location will be the Hartford area where we're forecasting a high of 89 degrees. Temperatures will be cooler along the shoreline and especially in southern New London county with a wind off of the water. 

    The warm weather will continue again on Wednesday with many inland areas reaching 90 degrees.

    Comfortable air will be in place for Tuesday but expect the humidity to increase by Wednesday with oppressive humidity moving in for Friday.


    This story uses functionality that may not work in our app. Click here to open the story in your web browser.

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    A car hit the outside of a liquor store in Newington on Monday.

    The crash happened at the Liquor Locker on Kelsey Street around 4:30 p.m.

    It appears the sedan jumped the curb and hit the exterior part of the building. Inside, a clerk was next to the window at the register. 

    The windows and brick facade were damaged. 

    No injuries were reported. 

    The crash is under investigation. 



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    A Cheshire man was shocked when he found out a bobcat had eaten one of his chickens. 

    "I was attempting to catch a raccoon," George Fletcher Jr. said. "To my surprise, a bobcat ended up being the culprit."

    Fletcher, who lives on Plank Road, set up a trap cage to catch the presumed raccoon that ate one of his chickens.

    But, to Fletcher's surprised, he walked out to find a bobcat in his cage. 

    "I didn't want to open the cage!" Fletcher said.

    A conservation officer from the state's Department of Energy & Environmental Protection (DEEP) came to the house and told Fletcher they don't relocate the animals, so they just let it go. 

    "It was a beautiful animal," Fletcher said. "Even if it ate a chicken."

    Fletcher said he has reinforced his chickens' cage. 



    Photo Credit: George Fletcher Jr.

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    The death of a Hartford woman who lost both legs after being hit by an SUV full of teenagers on July 18 has been ruled a homicide, the Office of Chief Medical Examiner (OCME).

    On Sunday, a teenager, Deykevious Russaw was charged in the crash with first-degree assault, second-degree larceny, evading responsibility, reckless driving and operating without a license. More charges are pending. 

    Family members said 56-year-old Rosella Shuler died Saturday night. Shuler lost both of her legs when she was hit by Toyota Highlander full of teenagers while she was standing on the sidewalk on Ashley Street in Hartford. A man who was standing on the sidewalk was also hurt.

    Police believe six teens were in the Toyota, which was stolen out of West Hartford, but they all fled the scene of the crash. Through surveillance video, police identified the person behind the wheel as 18-year-old Russaw.

    Russaw was already behind bars on an unrelated case and because he was juvenile at the time, police will not release the circumstances surrounding that arrest.

    But sources close to the investigation said the teenager was one of two teens arrested for the shooting death of 63-year-old Jeffrey Worrel, of Hartford, on July 16 in the Westland Street area. He faces a murder charge in that case, according to the sources. 

    The OCMe found that Shuler sustained blunt injuries to the trunk and lower extremities. 



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

    Two people were hurt after an SUV came barreling onto the sidewalk on Ashley Street in Hartford on July 18.Two people were hurt after an SUV came barreling onto the sidewalk on Ashley Street in Hartford on July 18.

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    Like many people who have grown up near the shoreline in Milford, Annette Petrus remembers venturing out on the sandbar at Silver Sands State Park.

    “We made it out to the island,” Petrus said. “Came back and halfway back the sandbar was covered and I had to swim part of the way. I was very frightened, but I made it.”

    Ten days ago, 28-year-old George Swaby from Bridgeport did not make it back to the beach after Milford Police said a strong current swept him off the sandbar.

    “It just makes you sick when you hear it and this was just the straw that broke the camel’s back, really,” Milford State Rep. Kim Rose said.

    Rose told NBC Connecticut she wants the language strengthened and to see the warning signs potentially translated into other languages.

    In the last two years, there have been 29 open water rescues by the sandbar, Rose said after she checked in with Milford Police.

    “Especially for a non-swimmer,” Rose said. “They can get sucked right into that tide.”

    Both Rose and Mayor Ben Blake told NBC Connecticut they would prefer lifeguards on duty seven days a week instead of the Department of Environmental Protection’s (DEEP) proposed ten million dollar renovation project.

    No lifeguard was on duty the day Swaby drowned.

    “DEEP’s statement was even if there were lifeguards they don’t enforce anything there because it’s a no swim zone,” Rose said. “That doesn’t make any sense to me.”

    Sarah Mastrone and her family from Trumbull visit Silver Sands a couple times in the summer.

    “I just think everyone has to be careful and be aware of what’s happening,” she said. “And not lose track of the time to make sure they can get back in time, but it’s scary.”

    Based on her experience when she was younger, Petrus has advice for beachgoers.

    “You just need to have common sense, know your tides,” she said. “Know what you’re doing, don’t walk out if you don’t know what you’re walking into.”

    Rose, the mayor and Milford first responders plan to meet with DEEP officials to address the dangers of the sandbar on August 8.

    “This sand bar does pose dangers to people who walk out in it,” DEEP Communications Director Dennis Schain said in an email. "As a result, we have several signs in that area with strong language warning of these dangers. We believe this to be the most practical approach to addressing this situation - but we are certainly eager to listen to and consider other ideas that Rep. Rose and others may have.”



    Photo Credit: NBCConnecticut.com

    A search is underway for a man missing in the water at Silver Sands in Milford.A search is underway for a man missing in the water at Silver Sands in Milford.

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    Earlier this summer, the state testing lab was backlogged for weeks because of the number tick submissions.

    Amy Guertin, of Norwich, knows she hasn’t finished a walk at Bluff Point State Park without checking her dog for ticks.

    “I would find five to 10 every time we went for a walk if it was woodsy. Crawling on (my dog),” Guertin said.

    Despite having the vaccination, her dog had Lyme disease last year and she’s seen even more ticks this year.

    “I don’t notice them as much in the heat,” Guertin said.

    State Entomologist Kirby Stafford said via email that the tick season is winding down as nymphal numbers decline. But it’s been a whirlwind of a spring and summer. The tick testing lab was backed up from early April to late June, Stafford said, adding they normally receive around 3,000 ticks each year. The total for this year will probably double that, he added.

    The infection rate was slightly higher this year in comparison to the average of the last decade, according to Stafford.

    That’s why Brianna Dunn, of New London, checks her daughter every time she’s outside and lathers her in bug spray.

    “She likes to run around a lot and you never know. So we just check her before we put her in the bath before we get home,” Dunn said.

    “I saw a child who had part of a classic Lyme rash extending below the ear,” Dr. Joseph Newell, of Gold Star Pediatrics in Groton, said.

    But that’s really the only Lyme disease-related case he’s seen this year. Newell said he and his colleagues have seen maybe 20 percent more tick-related cases last year compared to this year. He attributes that to better awareness.

    Russell Melmed, an epidemiologist with Ledge Light Health District, said he can confirm they’ve seen cases of three different tick-borne diseases. But he has to wait for the tick season to end before they can get a final tally and compare it to last year’s numbers.


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    Big changes are coming to Hartford Public Libraries this fall.

    At a public meeting Monday night, the library leadership explained that flat or decreasing revenue that they've received over the years has forced them to continue to scale back.

    Some branches used to be open late on weeknights and opened on Saturday. Now, none have late nights and none are opened on the weekends. According to a graph at the meeting - Hartford's public libraries currently receive 74 percent of its funding from Hartford, when back in 2010 it received 91 percent.

    To remain sustainable for the long-term, HPL's board of directors decided to close three of its ten branches, which includes Goodwin and Blue Hills. The Mark Twain location will become a mobile library.

    Along with that, the Ropkins branch will have its hours of operation cut nearly in half.

    "It's going to be missed in the community," said Hartford resident Shonta Browdy.

    Browdy came to the Ropkins location as a child and now she comes with her own children to enjoy the resources the library offers. She said the change in hours will certainly limit the amount of time they can come.

    Hartford Public Library Board President Gregory Davis said they simply have no choice and that locations must close. To make the decision, they looked at several factors including a location's proximity to other branches and its usage.

    As part of the larger plan, they're also increasing hours of operation to the six other locations. Davis said they are rated one of the top urban libraries in the country and that they plan to stay that way.

    "We actually believe the community at large will benefit from our new service plan, but we're just not able to afford to run ten branches the way we have the last couple of years," said Davis.

    The board said that they will not be losing any staff.

    Some community activists suggested raising more money from regional donors to save the libraries slated to close. The board said they're already raising a lot of money to sustain service they do have but just can't match the loss of revenue from the city.

    Davis said unless a miracle takes place and they're able to get $2 million, the changes begin Sept. 5. He said they're hoping to turn the closed libraries into community centers.

    Down the road, the plan is to expand the Camp Field and Albany branches. They're also looking to build a larger library between the Ropkins and Barbour branches. Once it's complete, Davis said they would look to close the Ropkins and Barbour locations. The planning for that is expected to take a couple years.

    There are three other public meetings taking place this week regarding the consolidation and changes:

    BLUE HILLS
    649 Blue Hills Avenue
    Tuesday, August 1, 6 p.m.

    GOODWIN
    460 New Britain Avenue
    Wednesday, August 2, 6 p.m.

    MARK TWAIN
    927 Asylum Avenue
    Thursday, August 3, 6 p.m.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    About one in three Americans used prescription opioid painkillers like OxyContin or Vicodin in 2015, according to a survey released by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, NBC News reported.

    The NIDA study calculated 91.8 million Americans used prescription opioids, with nearly five percent of adults surveyed saying they took them without their doctor’s permission.

    “The most commonly reported sources were friends and relatives for free,” the study reported. “Or a physician.”

    Also Monday, a presidential opioid commission chaired by New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie released an interim report that said the U.S. "is enduring a death toll equal to September 11th every three weeks." The report urged President Donald Trump to "declare a national emergency."

    The commission suggested expanding treatment facilities across the country, educating doctors about the proper way to prescribe pain medication, equipping all police officers with the anti-overdose remedy naloxone, developing new fentanyl detection sensors, and improving data-sharing among law enforcement agencies.



    Photo Credit: Getty Images

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    Big changes are coming to Hartford Public Libraries this fall.

    At a public meeting Monday night, the library leadership explained that flat or decreasing revenue that they've received over the years has forced them to continue to scale back.

    Some branches used to be open late on weeknights and opened on Saturday. Now, none have late nights and none are opened on the weekends. According to a graph at the meeting - Hartford's public libraries currently receive 74 percent of its funding from Hartford, when back in 2010 it received 91 percent.

    To remain sustainable for the long-term, HPL's board of directors decided to close three of its ten branches, which includes Goodwin and Blue Hills. The Mark Twain location will become a mobile library.

    Along with that, the Ropkins branch will have its hours of operation cut nearly in half.

    "It's going to be missed in the community," said Hartford resident Shonta Browdy.

    Browdy came to the Ropkins location as a child and now she comes with her own children to enjoy the resources the library offers. She said the change in hours will certainly limit the amount of time they can come.

    Hartford Public Library Board President Gregory Davis said they simply have no choice and that locations must close. To make the decision, they looked at several factors including a location's proximity to other branches and its usage.

    As part of the larger plan, they're also increasing hours of operation to the six other locations. Davis said they are rated one of the top urban libraries in the country and that they plan to stay that way.

    "We actually believe the community at large will benefit from our new service plan, but we're just not able to afford to run ten branches the way we have the last couple of years," said Davis.

    The board said that they will not be losing any staff.

    Some community activists suggested raising more money from regional donors to save the libraries slated to close. The board said they're already raising a lot of money to sustain service they do have but just can't match the loss of revenue from the city.

    Davis said unless a miracle takes place and they're able to get $2 million, the changes begin Sept. 5. He said they're hoping to turn the closed libraries into community centers.

    Down the road, the plan is to expand the Camp Field and Albany branches. They're also looking to build a larger library between the Ropkins and Barbour branches. Once it's complete, Davis said they would look to close the Ropkins and Barbour locations. The planning for that is expected to take a couple years.

    There are three other public meetings taking place this week regarding the consolidation and changes:

    BLUE HILLS
    649 Blue Hills Avenue
    Tuesday, August 1, 6 p.m.

    GOODWIN
    460 New Britain Avenue
    Wednesday, August 2, 6 p.m.

    MARK TWAIN
    927 Asylum Avenue
    Thursday, August 3, 6 p.m.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    An unmarked Stratford Police detective vehicle was involved in a two car accident that caused the vehicle to rollover and land in front of Pickle Barrel Deli.

    Police said the detective was responding to a non-emergency call around 12:30 a.m. this Tuesday morning and was heading southbound on Main Street when the vehicle was hit by a Honda traveling westbound on Stratford Avenue.

    Stratford Police are investigating what happened and the intersection is expected to be blocked until 8:00 a.m.

    Police said the detective was taken to Bridgeport Hospital and had been released.

    The female driver of the Honda was also taken to the Bridgeport Hospital and is recovering with non-life threatening injuries.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

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    Members of the state’s congressional delegation asked U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to rethink the order requiring Joel Colindres of New Fairfield to leave the country by August 17. 

    “Unbelievable people out there doing this for us,” Joel Colindres of New Fairfield, said.

    Senators Richard Blumenthal and Chris Murphy, along with Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty, wrote in part:

    “ICE has confirmed that Mr. Colindres has committed no crime, contributes to his community, is employed, pays taxes, and is raising a family.”

    “It gave us some hope. It gave us a little bit of hope,” Samantha Colindres, Joel’s wife, said.

    Last week dozens rallied in support of the father of two who has been in the country for 13 years.

    This followed ICE’s order Colindres return to Guatemala.

    The couple just bought the airline ticket.

    “It was hard. We weren’t ready to hit that click button yet for it. But we are hopeful we might not have to even use it is what we want to hold on to,” Samantha Colindres said.

    The 33-year-old hopes ICE takes a second look at his case.

    Recently he was ordered to leave despite previously being granted stays of deportation as he works through a snafu slowing his citizenship application.

    “It’s an amazing country. I want to be here. I want to be part of this country,” Joel Colindres said.

    We reached out to ICE for comment but have not yet heard back.

    Previously they told us they weren’t taking Colindres into custody and were instead place a GPS monitoring bracelet on him.



    Photo Credit: NBC Connecticut

    Joel Colindres and his wife Samantha.Joel Colindres and his wife Samantha.

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